Kazuya Uchino

Hyogo Cancer Center, Akasi, Hyōgo, Japan

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Publications (26)62.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The histological subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a significant factor when selecting treatment strategies. However, cases are occasionally encountered that are diagnosed as 'not otherwise specified' (NOS) prior to surgery, due to an uncertain histological subtype. The present study investigated the prognostic significance of the NOS subtype for patients with resectable NSCLC. Between 2001 and 2011, 1,913 patients were diagnosed with NSCLC using transbronchial biopsy and underwent surgical resection at two facilities in Japan. Of these patients, 151 (7.9%) were pre-operatively diagnosed with NSCLC-NOS (NOS group) and the remainder had confirmed histological subtypes (confirmed group). The present study compared the clinicopathological features and prognoses of these groups. Analyses of resected specimens revealed that pleomorphic cell carcinoma, large cell neuroendocrine cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma were significantly more common in the NOS group than in the confirmed group (P<0.001, P=0.002, P=0.019 and P=0.014, respectively). The five-year survival rate was significantly poorer in the NOS group (60.5 vs. 67.1%; P=0.010), particularly for stage I disease (70.8 vs. 80.7%; P=0.007). The results of a multivariate analysis of overall survival indicated that NOS was a significant independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.86; P=0.041). These results indicated that pre-operative NOS was significantly associated with poorer survival, including for stage I disease. In conjunction with other clinicopathological parameters, NOS can be a useful prognostic factor when deciding on a treatment strategy for NSCLC.
    Oncology letters 09/2014; 8(3):1017-1024. · 0.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is a rare high-grade malignant tumor. Because large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare, the optimal treatment, including perioperative chemotherapy, has not been defined. We retrospectively analyzed the correlation among the effectiveness of perioperative chemotherapy in treating large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, pathologic stage, and immunoreactivity to neuroendocrine markers. METHODS: A total of 63 patients with pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma undergoing surgical resection from 2001 to 2009 were included. The resected tumors were immunohistochemically stained with the 3 neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and neural cell adhesion molecule. We categorized patients who were positive for all 3 markers as the triple-positive group and those who were negative for 1 or 2 markers as the non-triple-positive group. RESULTS: Perioperative chemotherapy resulted in better overall survival than surgery alone (P = .042). Multivariate analysis of survival revealed that perioperative chemotherapy was a significant independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 0.323; 95% confidence interval, 0.112-0.934; P = .0371). Among the patients who received perioperative chemotherapy, the non-triple-positive group had a significantly greater 5-year survival rate than the triple-positive group (P = .0216). Moreover, among the non-triple-positive group, a significantly greater 5-year survival rate was observed for the patients who underwent surgery with chemotherapy than for those who underwent surgery without chemotherapy (P = .0081). In contrast, no difference was found in 5-year survival between patients with chemotherapy and those without chemotherapy when the tumors were triple positive. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that perioperative chemotherapy might benefit the survival of patients with pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, in particular when the tumors are not immunoreactive to all 3 neuroendocrine markers.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 04/2012; · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We focused on OGG1 Ser326Cys, MUTYH Gln324His, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC3 Thr241Met and examined the relationship between the different genotypes and survival of Japanese lung cancer patients. A total of 99 Japanese lung cancer patients were recruited into our study. Clinical data were collected, and genotypes of the target genes were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Survival analysis to verify the impact of these gene polymorphisms on the clinical outcome of lung cancer showed that lung squamous cell carcinoma patients with the Thr/Met genotype at XRCC3 had a significantly shorter survival time than those with the Thr/Thr genotype (13 months versus 48 months; log-rank test, p < 0.0001). Cox regression analysis showed that the carriers of XRCC3 genotypes were at a significantly higher risk [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 9.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.52-34.68, p = 0.001; adjusted HR = 9.05, 95% CI = 1.89-44.39, p = 0.006]. Our results suggest that XRCC3 Thr241Met may act as a favorable prognostic indicator for lung squamous cell carcinoma patients.
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences 01/2012; 13(12):16658-67. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiosarcoma is a rare neoplasm, accounting for only 1%-2% of all sarcomas. It occurs most frequently in the skin and soft tissue and rarely in the thoracic region. To our knowledge, a mediastinal angiosarcoma is extremely rare. We report on the surgical resection of a rare case of giant epithelioid angiosarcoma originating in the anterior mediastinum, followed by six courses of adjuvant chemotherapy (doxorubicin + ifosfamide). The patient is alive and asymptomatic 1 year after surgery. As the prognosis for unresectable cases is generally dismal, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy can be an option for mediastinal angiosarcoma.
    General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 07/2011; 59(7):503-6.
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    ABSTRACT: The significance and handling of microscopic invasion of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) into hilar peribronchovascular soft tissue (SHEATH+) have not been defined in the TNM classification by AJCC/UICC; nevertheless, SHEATH+ may be equivalent to spread into the mediastinum. Also, assessment of the margin of peribronchial resection is challenging because of the technical difficulty of inking, and intraoperative and postoperative artifacts. Records of 592 consecutive Asian patients with primary NSCLC (excluding adenocarcinoma in situ) who had, without any preoperative therapy, undergone lobectomy, sleeve lobectomy and pneumonectomy were examined. SHEATH+, simply defined as invasion of hilar peribronchovascular soft tissue, without categorizing any invasive patterns, and its significance were statistically analyzed. Forty-four SHEATH+ cases demonstrated significantly advanced TNM stages, and were statistically associated with central occurrence, pN1-3, and vascular invasion, as assessed by logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant differences were observed between TNM stage-adjusted frequency of recurrence and recurrence-free intervals. Kaplan-Meier's estimates of the rate of overall and recurrence-free survival after surgery showed no statistically significant differences between SHEATH+ and SHEATH-. Cox's multivariate analysis suggested SHEATH was not a statistically independent prognostic factor under the TNM classification by AJCC/UICC (7th edition). SHEATH+ in NSCLC was simply associated with central occurrence and advanced TNM stages. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the significance of SHEATH+ in NSCLC.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 12/2010; 73(1):89-95. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A simple screening method for quantitatively analyzing asbestos bodies that can be carried out even in community hospitals, is needed in order for laborers and neighborhoods in the vicinity of asbestos factories to apply for compensation for asbestos-related injury. Eighty-eight consecutive cases of surgically resected primary lung cancer were analyzed for asbestos bodies using two methods, and the correlation between them was statistically examined. The first was the conventional technique using lung tissue digestion and phase-contrast scanning, and the second was the authors' method using light microscopy to scan the sediment of formalin-injected lung specimens. The overall correlation coefficient of the concentration of asbestos bodies between the authors' method (C(AB/SED)) and the conventional method (C(AB/DLT)) was 0.4576, a weak statistically significant correlation; in patients with occupational asbestos exposure, however, the correlation coefficient was 0.7341. Despite the cost, it may be prudent to use the conventional method under the present law for patients with C(AB/SED)>or=3.5/mL. C(AB/DLT) >3000/g dry lung tissue when C(AB/SED) is >or=3.5/mL suggests the potential for the accumulation of asbestos absorption by lung tissue.
    Pathology International 02/2010; 60(2):78-86. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We reported on 34 patients with superior sulcus non-small-cell lung cancer and clinical outcome. It is necessary to select the most appropriate approach from preoperative examination and the degree of infiltration at the chest wall. Recently, various approach and preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection is effective for the treatment of superior sulcus tumor (SST), we should keep challenging for radical resection in mind.
    Kyobu geka. The Japanese journal of thoracic surgery 01/2010; 63(1):18-22.
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    ABSTRACT: DNA repair enzymes play an important role in the development of various kinds of cancer. We here analyzed associations of XPD Lys751Gln, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms in DNA repair pathways in relation to the risk of lung cancer using PCR-RFLP. The study involved 104 lung cancer patients and 120 non-cancer controls divided into non-smokers and smokers. We found a statistically significant interaction between APEX1 Asp148Glu and the risk for lung cancer (adjusted OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.58-4.90, p=0.0004), of both adenocarcinoma (adjusted OR 2.24, 95%CI 1.18-4.25, p=0.014) and squamous cell carcinoma (adjusted OR 4.75, 95%CI 1.79-12.6, p=0.002) types. XRCC1 Arg399Gln showed a borderline significant association with adenocarcinoma (adjusted OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.00-3.57, p=0.051). The combined effect of smoking and presence of the APEX1 Asp148Glu demonstrated a significant association with risk of lung cancer (adjusted OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.74-7.50, p=0.001). The XPD Lys751Gln and XRCC3 Thr241Met genotypes displayed no statistically significant risk. Our findings suggest that the APEX1 Asp148Glu is associated with increased risk for primary lung cancer in Japanese individuals partaking in smoking.
    Asian Pacific journal of cancer prevention: APJCP 01/2010; 11(5):1181-6. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Haigan 01/2009; 49(3):313-316.
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    ABSTRACT: A 15-year-old boy was admitted with a pneumothorax of the left lung. Computed tomographic scans demonstrated a tumor 20 mm in diameter situated on the left main to upper lobar bronchus that eventually was proved to be a typical carcinoid tumor by transbronchial biopsy. We performed bronchial resection with atypical bronchoplasty, which preserves lung parenchyma in cases of s-T1N0M0 disease. The patient has had no evidence of recurrence 7 years after surgery.
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 09/2006; 54(8):345-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Reduced expression of connexins (Cxs), gap junction proteins, is frequently reported in malignant cell lines and tumors, whereas recent studies suggested that C x 26, a subtype of Cxs, might help tumor cells acquire malignant phenotypes. To examine this suggestion in the clinical setting, 50 lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were stained with the anti-C x 26 antibody. No C x 26-specific signals were detectable in 34 tumors (group I; 68%), whereas the remaining 16 were judged positive for C x 26 (group II; 32%). In 14 tumors of group II, C x 26-specific signals were detected not in all SCC cells but in SCC cells facing the tumor stroma or capsule, in which the signals were localized on the plasma membrane. Involved lymph nodes of group-II patients often contained metastatic foci consisting of all C x 26-positive cells. The proportion of C x 26-positive to C x 26-negative SCC cells in the metastatic nodes was larger than that in the corresponding primary tumors. C x 26-positive SCC cells seemed to be more invasive and metastatic than negative ones. Consistently, the 5-year cancer-specific survival rate of group-II patients was significantly lower than that of group-I patients (12.5 vs 38.9%; P=0.0391). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that C x 26 expression (P=0.0448) as well as pathological stage (P=0.0338) and vascular invasion (P=0.0191) were independent, significant prognostic predictors. These results suggest that C x 26 may represent an essential effector for controlling the biological aggressiveness of lung SCC tumor.
    Cancer Letters 04/2006; 234(2):239-48. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As a result of increasing discovery of small-sized lung cancer in clinical practice, tumor size has come to be considered an important variable affecting planning of treatment. Nevertheless, there have been no reports including large numbers of patients and focusing on tumor size, and controversy remains concerning the surgical management of small-sized tumors. Therefore, we investigated the relationships between tumor dimension and clinical and follow-up data, as well as surgical procedure in particular. We reviewed the records of 1272 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection for non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. Fifty patients had tumors of 10 mm or less, 273 had tumors of 11 to 20 mm, 368 had tumors of 21 to 30 mm, and 581 had tumors of greater than 30 mm in diameter. The cancer-specific 5-year survivals of patients in these 4 groups were 100%, 83.5%, 76.5%, and 57.9%, respectively. For patients with pathologic stage I disease, they were 100%, 92.6%, 84.1%, and 76.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that male sex, older age, larger tumor, and advanced pathologic stage adversely affected survival. Lesser resection was performed in 167 (52%) of 323 patients with a tumor of 20 mm or less in diameter but in 156 (16%) of 949 patients with a tumor of greater than 20 mm in diameter. The percentages of lesser resection among all procedures performed were 79%, 56%, 30%, and 15% in patients with pathologic stage I disease with a tumor of 10 mm or less, 11 to 20 mm, 21 to 30 mm, and greater than 30 mm in diameter, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survivals of patients with pathologic stage I disease with tumors of 20 mm or less and 21 to 30 mm in diameter were 92.4% and 87.4% after lobectomy, 96.7% and 84.6% after segmentectomy, and 85.7% and 39.4% after wedge resection, respectively. On the other hand, with a tumor of greater than 30 mm in diameter, survivals were 81.3% after lobectomy, 62.9% after segmentectomy, and 0% after wedge resection, respectively. Tumor size is an independent and significant prognostic factor and important for planning of surgical treatment. Although lobectomy should be chosen for patients with a tumor of greater than 30 mm in diameter, further investigation is required for tumors of 21 to 30 mm in diameter. Segmentectomy should, as a lesser anatomic resection, be distinguished from wedge resection and might be acceptable for patients with a tumor of 20 mm or less in diameter without nodal involvement.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 02/2005; 129(1):87-93. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of The Japanese Association for Chest Surgery. 01/2005; 19(4):576-580.
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    ABSTRACT: Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has all of the properties desired for a biologic measure to be used as a prognostic indicator in the clinical evaluation of lung cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen value appears to be related to tumor histologic type and patients' smoking status, which has yet to be intensively analyzed as reports available thus far have consisted of a limited number of patients. This study was undertaken to determine whether the prognostic value of CEA differs according to histologic type in a large group of patients with clinical early-stage lung cancer, and how smoking influences its value. Two series of 694 and 260 consecutive patients who underwent resection for clinical stage I lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively, were evaluated. We measured serum CEA before and after surgery, and analyzed its prognostic significance in relation to histologic type and its correlation with smoking status. We found significantly higher CEA levels in patients with adenocarcinomas than in those with squamous cell carcinomas (7.8 versus 5.5 ng/mL; p = 0.0018), but a higher percentage of CEA-positive patients among those with squamous cell carcinoma (109 of 260, 41.9%) than those with adenocarcinoma (245 of 694, 35.3%). Clinical stage I patients with a high preoperative CEA level had a poor prognosis, and for pathologically confirmed stage I patients with a high postoperative CEA level the prognosis was worse. The prognostic value of serum CEA level was thus significantly greater for adenocarcinoma than for squamous cell carcinoma. This was probably because of a much higher proportion of smokers among patients with squamous cell carcinoma. In adenocarcinoma, the growth of which was generally less influenced by smoking, the proportion of CEA-positive smokers (49.3%, 170 of 345) was greater than that of CEA-positive nonsmokers (21.5%, 75 of 349, p < 0.0001). Additionally, in patients with adenocarcinoma, survival of nonsmokers was more greatly influenced by CEA level than that of smokers. Although serum CEA values measured before and after surgery are important in identifying patients at high risk of poor survival, its specificity is higher for adenocarcinoma than for squamous cell carcinoma. When serum CEA levels are checked, smoking status of patients, particularly of those with squamous cell carcinoma, should be taken into account.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 10/2004; 78(3):1004-9; discussion 1009-10. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although sleeve segmentectomy for centrally located lung cancers was originally designed for patients unable to tolerate lobectomy, we have tried it in patients with noncompromised function as well. We evaluated the efficiency of this atypical type of bronchoplasty. Of 202 patients for whom we performed bronchoplasty for primary non-small cell lung carcinoma, 16 underwent sleeve segmentectomy. Sixteen patients were classified into 4 groups according to the mode of bronchial reconstruction: type A, anastomosis between the right intermediate or left main and basal segmental bronchi with removal of the superior segment of the lower lobe (S6; n = 7); type B, anastomosis between the left main and lingular bronchi with removal of the upper division of the left upper lobe (S1+2+3; n = 3); type C, anastomosis between the left main and upper division bronchi with removal of the lingular segments (S4+5; n = 4); and type D, others (n = 2). Nine patients had pulmonary function sufficient to tolerate lobectomy. The tumors were completely resected in all patients. Combined performance of pulmonary angioplasty was carried out in 2 patients. Bronchial reconstruction was successful in all patients, with neither bronchial complications nor local recurrences. Ten patients had stage IA disease, and 6 had more advanced disease. All patients were alive, except 1 who died as a result of distant metastasis and 2 who died of noncancerous causes. Overall 3-year and 5-year survivals were 93.3% and 68.1%, respectively. Sleeve segmentectomy, which is technically demanding, should be considered in patients with centrally located and possibly curable early non-small cell lung cancer because the prevalence of small-sized or multiple lung tumors has been increasing and because our findings suggest that this lung-saving operation is safe and useful.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 10/2004; 128(3):420-4. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We prospectively evaluated the efficacy of water seal in the management of air leak after pulmonary resection. Eighty-seven patients who underwent lobectomy were enrolled. Air leak was qualitatively described on each postoperative day using a six-grade scale. All chest tubes were continuously suctioned at a negative pressure of 12 cm H2O until the morning of postoperative day (POD) 1. Switch was made to water seal if the air leak was graded as "minor at expiration" or lower. This procedure is referred to as "the water seal challenge". On POD 1, 58 patients had air leaks. The water seal challenge was attempted on POD 1.6+/-1.0. While 45 patients (78%) continued to receive the water seal, the remaining 13 patients were switched to suctioning at -5 cm H2O followed by the successful second water seal challenge within 3 days from the first challenge. The air leak stopped 3.1+/-3.0 days after the application of the water seal in the 58 patients. None of the following correlated with the duration of air leak: preoperative pulmonary function tests, type of lobectomy, age, and gender. Only the leak grade on POD 0 correlated significantly with the duration of air leaks (p<0.0001). These results show that water seal is a safe and effective management option for air leak during the early postoperative period.
    The Japanese Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 07/2004; 52(6):292-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The prognostic implication of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has yet to be comprehensively analyzed since the reports available so far have comprised small patient populations. We evaluated perioperative CEA values with regard to surgical results in a large number of patients to clarify its merit. We measured serum CEA levels before and after surgery in 1,000 consecutive patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer who underwent resection of tumor. High CEA value was greater than 5.0 ng/mL. Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (36.8%) had high preoperative CEA levels. The CEA levels after surgery were normalized in 242 patients (24.2%) and persistently elevated in 126 patients (12.6%). High CEA levels were seen more frequently in patients with older age, male gender, larger size of tumor, incomplete resection, and advanced pathologic stage. Patients with a high preoperative CEA level had a poor survival. Among these patients, even worse survival was seen for those with a high postoperative CEA level. These prognostic trends were still observed for patients with pathologic stage I disease. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that both preoperative and postoperative CEA levels were independent prognostic determinants (p = 0.0243 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Perioperative measurement of serum CEA concentrations yields information valuable for detecting patients at high risk of poor survival. Normalization of CEA levels after surgery was a significant favorable prognostic sign in patients with an elevated CEA level before surgery. Even after apparently successful surgical therapy, patients with a high CEA level should be carefully followed up, and might represent a suitable target for neoadjuvant clinical trials.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 07/2004; 78(1):216-21. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer is still the most common cause of death due to cancer. Although the 5-year survival rate of patients with lung cancer is reported to be increasing, whether the surgical results have actually been improving or not is controversial. We reviewed our experience to evaluate time trends of surgical outcomes in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer. We reviewed the clinical records of 1465 consecutive patients with proven primary nonsmall cell carcinoma who underwent complete removal of the primary tumor together with hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes from 1985 to 1995 (early era) and from 1996 to 2002 (late era). The clinical characteristics, surgical outcome, and overall survival of the patients were analyzed, and data from the two eras were compared. There were 694 patients in the early era and 771 in the late era. As for their characteristics, elder age, female sex, adenocarcinoma, earlier stage of disease and smaller size of tumor were more frequently encountered in the late era. Lobectomy was the most common procedure performed during both periods, and in the late era, the rate of segmentectomy was doubled (11% to 25%) whereas that of pneumonectomy was much less (6% to 1%). Although the frequency of operative deaths in the two eras did not differ (0.3%), that of in-hospital deaths and of postoperative complications decreased significantly in the late era (2% to 0.5% and 28% to 12%, respectively). A significant improvement in survival probability was observed in patients with pathologic stage IA (p < 0.0001), IB (p = 0.0477), and III disease (p = 0.00120) but not in those with pathologic stage II disease (p = 0.5353). Also, the multivariate analysis of patients with pathologic stage I or III demonstrated that age, sex, and size of the tumor were significant prognostic determinants, and confirmed that the recent prolonged survivals remained significant even after simultaneous adjustment for other factors. These data indicate a significant recent improvement in surgical outcomes after stratification of various prognostic variables although careful consideration should be given to the retrospective nature of this study.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 06/2004; 77(6):1926-30; discussion 1931. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Differentiation of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma from other subtypes of lung adenocarcinomas is important in the preoperative assessment of patients. We examined the biologic aggressiveness of small-sized adenocarcinomas according to the pathologically defined bronchioloalveolar carcinoma degree and its correlation with computed tomography findings. In addition, we attempted to predict which patients were suitable for a lesser resection. Of 424 consecutive patients who underwent operation for primary lung cancer in the last 3 years, 114 with a histopathologically proven adenocarcinoma 3 cm or less in diameter underwent complete removal of the primary tumor. We examined the characteristics of patients classified into 3 groups based on the proportion of the bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component: 0% to 20% (n = 40), 21% to 50% (n = 38), and 51% to 100% (n = 36). We also investigated the correlation of the bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component with computed tomography findings such as ground-glass opacity (defined as a hazy increase on the lung window) and tumor shadow disappearance rate (defined as the ratio of the tumor area of the mediastinal window to that of the lung window). Male gender (P =.0001), advanced pathologic stage (P =.001), larger size of the tumor (P =.004), nodal involvement (P =.04), pleural invasion (P =.0003), lymphatic invasion (P =.002), and vascular invasion (P =.0002) were observed more often among patients with a smaller proportion of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. A positive and significant correlation was found between the rate of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component and ground-glass opacity (R(2) = 0.488, P <.0001) and tumor shadow disappearance rate (R(2) = 0.727, P <.0001). As an independent predictor of nodal status, tumor shadow disappearance rate (P =.015) and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component (P =.015), as well as tumor size, were significantly valuable, although ground-glass opacity proportion (P =.086) was marginally informative. Small-sized adenocarcinomas with a greater ratio of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component showed less aggressive behavior. Both tumor shadow disappearance rate and ground-glass opacity ratios, which are obtained preoperatively, were well associated with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma ratios, which are determined postoperatively. Furthermore, tumor shadow disappearance rate had a stronger impact as a predictor of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component. Preoperative assessment of tumor shadow disappearance rate may be useful to identify patients requiring a less extensive pulmonary resection.
    Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 03/2004; 127(3):857-61. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There have been no proven preoperative indicators for postoperative survival of patients with an adenocarcinoma, the incidence of which has been increasing lately. Of 952 consecutive patients operated on for primary lung cancer between 1995 and 2002, 167 patients with a proven adenocarcinoma 3 cm or less in diameter underwent complete removal of the primary tumor. We examined their computed tomographic scans to estimate tumor shadow disappearance rate (TDR), which was defined as the ratio of the tumor area of the mediastinal window to that of the lung window, reviewed the clinical records, and evaluated their relation to prognosis. On univariate analyses, size of the tumor (p = 0.0380), TDR (p = 0.0018), carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.0001) pathologic stage (p < 0.0001), nodal involvement (p < 0.0001), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.0001), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0017) were significantly associated with prognosis. Also, the outcomes of multivariate analyses for preoperative factors indicated that TDR (p = 0.0340) and carcinoembryonic antigen (p = 0.0047) are significant independent prognostic determinants. The 5-year survival was 48% in cases with a TDR of 0% to 25%, 87% in those with a TDR of 26% to 50%, 97% in those with a TDR of 51% to 75%, and 100% in those with a TDR of 76% to 100%. The incidence of lymphatic, vascular invasion, and nodal metastases was lower in patients with a higher TDR. Small-sized adenocarcinomas with a higher TDR showed less lymphatic, vascular vessel invasion, or nodal involvement, and demonstrated longer survival, suggesting that TDR was associated with clinical-pathologic characteristics and tumor aggressiveness. Preoperative assessment of TDR may be useful to identify an appropriate candidate for a lesser pulmonary resection.
    The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 01/2004; 76(6):1828-32; discussion 1832. · 3.45 Impact Factor