Ari Kikuta

National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Are you Ari Kikuta?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)139.24 Total impact

  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) libraries consisting of 172,000 clones were constructed from a two-row malting barley cultivar (Hordeum vulgare 'Haruna Nijo') under normal and stressed conditions. After sequencing the clones from both ends and clustering the sequences, a total of 24,783 complete sequences were produced. By removing duplicates between these and publicly available sequences, 22,651 representative sequences were obtained: 17,773 were novel barley FLcDNAs, and 1,699 were barley specific. Highly conserved genes were found in the barley FLcDNA sequences for 721 of 881 rice (Oryza sativa) trait genes with 50% or greater identity. These FLcDNA resources from our Haruna Nijo cDNA libraries and the full-length sequences of representative clones will improve our understanding of the biological functions of genes in barley, which is the cereal crop with the fourth highest production in the world, and will provide a powerful tool for annotating the barley genome sequences that will become available in the near future.
    Plant physiology 03/2011; 156(1):20-8. · 6.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Here we present the genomic sequence of the African cultivated rice, Oryza glaberrima, and compare these data with the genome sequence of Asian cultivated rice, Oryza sativa. We obtained gene-enriched sequences of O. glaberrima that correspond to about 25% of the gene regions of the O. sativa (japonica) genome by methylation filtration and subtractive hybridization of repetitive sequences. While patterns of amino acid changes did not differ between the two species in terms of the biochemical properties, genes of O. glaberrima generally showed a larger synonymous-nonsynonymous substitution ratio, suggesting that O. glaberrima has undergone a genome-wide relaxation of purifying selection. We further investigated nucleotide substitutions around splice sites and found that eight genes of O. sativa experienced changes at splice sites after the divergence from O. glaberrima. These changes produced novel introns that partially truncated functional domains, suggesting that these newly emerged introns affect gene function. We also identified 2451 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from the genomes of O. glaberrima and O. sativa. Although tri-nucleotide repeats were most common among the SSRs and were overrepresented in the protein-coding sequences, we found that selection against indels of tri-nucleotide repeats was relatively weak in both African and Asian rice. Our genome-wide sequencing of O. glaberrima and in-depth analyses provide rice researchers not only with useful genomic resources for future breeding but also with new insights into the genomic evolution of the African and Asian rice species.
    The Plant Journal 02/2011; 66(5):796-805. · 6.58 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Centromeres are sites for assembly of the chromosomal structures that mediate faithful segregation at mitosis and meiosis. This function is conserved across species, but the DNA components that are involved in kinetochore formation differ greatly, even between closely related species. To shed light on the nature, evolutionary timing and evolutionary dynamics of rice centromeres, we decoded a 2.25-Mb DNA sequence covering the centromeric region of chromosome 8 of an indica rice variety, 'Kasalath' (Kas-Cen8). Analysis of repetitive sequences in Kas-Cen8 led to the identification of 222 long terminal repeat (LTR)-retrotransposon elements and 584 CentO satellite monomers, which account for 59.2% of the region. A comparison of the Kas-Cen8 sequence with that of japonica rice 'Nipponbare' (Nip-Cen8) revealed that about 66.8% of the Kas-Cen8 sequence was collinear with that of Nip-Cen8. Although the 27 putative genes are conserved between the two subspecies, only 55.4% of the total LTR-retrotransposon elements in 'Kasalath' had orthologs in 'Nipponbare', thus reflecting recent proliferation of a considerable number of LTR-retrotransposons since the divergence of two rice subspecies of indica and japonica within Oryza sativa. Comparative analysis of the subfamilies, time of insertion, and organization patterns of inserted LTR-retrotransposons between the two Cen8 regions revealed variations between 'Kasalath' and 'Nipponbare' in the preferential accumulation of CRR elements, and the expansion of CentO satellite repeats within the core domain of Cen8. Together, the results provide insights into the recent proliferation of LTR-retrotransposons, and the rapid expansion of CentO satellite repeats, underlying the dynamic variation and plasticity of plant centromeres.
    The Plant Journal 09/2009; 60(5):805-19. · 6.58 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a model organism for the functional genomics of monocotyledonous plants since the genome size is considerably smaller than those of other monocotyledonous plants. Although highly accurate genome sequences of indica and japonica rice are available, additional resources such as full-length complementary DNA (FL-cDNA) sequences are also indispensable for comprehensive analyses of gene structure and function. We cross-referenced 28.5K individual loci in the rice genome defined by mapping of 578K FL-cDNA clones with the 56K loci predicted in the TIGR genome assembly. Based on the annotation status and the presence of corresponding cDNA clones, genes were classified into 23K annotated expressed (AE) genes, 33K annotated non-expressed (ANE) genes, and 5.5K non-annotated expressed (NAE) genes. We developed a 60mer oligo-array for analysis of gene expression from each locus. Analysis of gene structures and expression levels revealed that the general features of gene structure and expression of NAE and ANE genes were considerably different from those of AE genes. The results also suggested that the cloning efficiency of rice FL-cDNA is associated with the transcription activity of the corresponding genetic locus, although other factors may also have an effect. Comparison of the coverage of FL-cDNA among gene families suggested that FL-cDNA from genes encoding rice- or eukaryote-specific domains, and those involved in regulatory functions were difficult to produce in bacterial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that rice genes can be divided into distinct groups based on transcription activity and gene structure, and that the coverage bias of FL-cDNA clones exists due to the incompatibility of certain eukaryotic genes in bacteria.
    PLoS ONE 02/2007; 2(11):e1235. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rice, one of the world's most important food plants, has important syntenic relationships with the other cereal species and is a model plant for the grasses. Here we present a map-based, finished quality sequence that covers 95% of the 389 Mb genome, including virtually all of the euchromatin and two complete centromeres. A total of 37,544 non-transposable-element-related protein-coding genes were identified, of which 71% had a putative homologue in Arabidopsis. In a reciprocal analysis, 90% of the Arabidopsis proteins had a putative homologue in the predicted rice proteome. Twenty-nine per cent of the 37,544 predicted genes appear in clustered gene families. The number and classes of transposable elements found in the rice genome are consistent with the expansion of syntenic regions in the maize and sorghum genomes. We find evidence for widespread and recurrent gene transfer from the organelles to the nuclear chromosomes. The map-based sequence has proven useful for the identification of genes underlying agronomic traits. The additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeats identified in our study should accelerate improvements in rice production.
    Nature 01/2005; 436(7052):793-800. · 38.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rice, one of the world's most important food plants, has important syntenic relationships with the other cereal species and is a model plant for the grasses. Here we present a map-based, finished quality sequence that covers 95% of the 389 Mb genome, including virtually all of the euchromatin and two complete centromeres. A total of 37,544 non-transposable-element-related protein-coding genes were identified, of which 71% had a putative homologue in Arabidopsis. In a reciprocal analysis, 90% of the Arabidopsis proteins had a putative homologue in the predicted rice proteome. Twenty-nine per cent of the 37,544 predicted genes appear in clustered gene families. The number and classes of transposable elements found in the rice genome are consistent with the expansion of syntenic regions in the maize and sorghum genomes. We find evidence for widespread and recurrent gene transfer from the organelles to the nuclear chromosomes. The map-based sequence has proven useful for the identification of genes underlying agronomic traits. The additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms and simple sequence repeats identified in our study should accelerate improvements in rice production.
    Nature 01/2005; 436(7052):793-800. · 38.60 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The rice species
    Nature 11/2002; 420(6913):312-316. · 38.60 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

454 Citations
26 Downloads
562 Views
139.24 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2002
    • National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan