Joong-Won Park

National Cancer Center Korea, Kōyō, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea

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Publications (72)295.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) in patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 53 patients with inoperable HCC underwent SIB-IMRT using two dose-fractionation schemes, depending on the proximity of gastrointestinal structures. The 41 patients in the low dose-fractionation (LD) group, with internal target volume (ITV) < 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 55 and 44 Gy in 22 fractions to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 2 (PTV2), respectively. The 12 patients in the high dose-fractionation (HD) group, with ITV ≥ 1 cm from gastrointestinal structures, received total doses of 66 and 55 Gy in 22 fractions to the PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no grade > 3 toxicity. The LD group had larger sized tumors (median: 6 vs. 3.4 cm) and greater frequencies of vascular invasion (80.6 vs. 16.7 %) than patients in the HD group (p < 0.05 each). The median overall survival (OS) was 25.1 mKonzept ist machbar und sicheronths and the actuarial 2-year local progression-free survival (LPFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and OS rates were 67.3, 14.7, and 54.7 %, respectively. The HD group tended to show better tumor response (100 vs. 62.2 %, p = 0.039) and 2-year LPFS (85.7 vs. 59 %, p = 0.119), RFS (38.1 vs. 7.3 %, p = 0.063), and OS (83.3 vs. 44.3 %, p = 0.037) rates than the LD group. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor response was significantly associated with OS. SIB-IMRT is feasible and safe for patients with inoperable HCC.
    Strahlentherapie und Onkologie 03/2014; · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of proton beam therapy (PBT) in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Twenty-seven HCC patients with PVTT underwent PBT, including 22 patients with modified International Union Against Cancer (mUICC) stage IVA,five patients with stage IVB primary tumors, and 16 with main PVTT. A median dose of 55 GyE (range, 50-66 GyE) in 20-22 fractions was delivered to a target volume encompassing both the PVTT and primary tumor. Overall, treatment was well tolerated, with no toxicity of grade ≥ 3. Median overall survival (OS) times in all patients and in stage IVA patients were 13.2 months and 16 months, respectively. Assessments of PVTT response showed complete response in 0 of 27 (0 %) patients, partial response in 15 (55.6 %), stable disease in 10 (37 %), and progressive disease in 2 (7.4 %) patients, with an objective response rate of 55.6 %. PVTT responders showed significantly higher actuarial 1-year local progression-free survival (LPFS; 85.6 % vs. 51.3 %), relapse-free survival (RFS; 20 % vs. 0 %) and OS (80 % vs. 25 %) rates than nonresponders (p < 0.05 each). Multivariate analysis showed that PVTT response and mUICC stage were independent prognostic factors for OS. Our data suggest that PBT could improve LPFS, RFS, and OS in advanced HCC patients with PVTT and it is feasible and safe for these patients.
    Strahlentherapie und Onkologie 03/2014; · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • Hwi Young Kim, Joong-Won Park
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    ABSTRACT: Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that targets angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become a standard treatment for advanced-stage HCC and has shown survival benefits in recent clinical trials. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and sorafenib are currently standard treatments for intermediate and advanced-stage HCC, respectively. Combined locoregional therapy, including TACE and molecular targeted therapies such as sorafenib, is an issue under active investigation in an attempt to improve the outcomes of patients with unresectable HCC. Various clinical trials of these combined strategies have been conducted; however, the designs of these studies are diverse in terms of treatment modalities and schedules; comparisons with controls, baseline tumor stages, and hepatic functional reserves; and outcome measures. This article reviews heterogeneity in the design of recent clinical trials of combined locoregional and molecular targeted therapies and briefly addresses future study directions.
    Liver cancer. 03/2014; 3(1):9-17.
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    Journal of Hepatology 01/2014; · 9.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A standard treatment for unresectable advanced-stage intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) has not yet been established. Although neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and liver transplantation are associated with long-term survival in select patients, the outcomes of CCRT for advanced-stage unresectable IHCC remain unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcomes of CCRT in patients with unresectable advanced-stage IHCC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients with unresectable advanced stage (stage IVa or IVb) IHCC who were pathologically diagnosed and treated at National Cancer Center, Korea, from June 2001 to March 2012. Of the total of 92 patients, 25 (27.1%) received capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) chemotherapy with external radiotherapy (RT) (XP-CCRT group) and 67 (72.8%) received XP chemotherapy alone (XP group). The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the 2 groups were compared. The 92 patients comprised 72 male and 20 female patients, with a median age of 58 years (range 26-78 years). The baseline clinical characteristics of the 2 groups were similar. Patients in the XP-CCRT group received a mean 44.7 Gy of RT and a mean 5.6 cycles of XP chemotherapy, whereas patients in the XP group received a mean 4.0 cycles. The disease control rate was higher in the XP-CCRT group than in the XP group, but the difference was not statistically significant (56.0% vs. 41.5%, p = 0.217). Although neutropenia was significantly more frequent in the XP-CCRT than in the XP group (48% vs. 9%, p < 0.001), the rates of other toxicities and > grade 3 toxicities did not differ. At a median follow-up of 5.3 months, PFS (4.3 vs. 1.9 months, p = 0.001) and OS (9.3 vs. 6.2 months, p = 0.048) were significantly longer in the XP-CCRT than in the XP group. XP-CCRT was well tolerated and was associated with longer PFS and OS than XP chemotherapy alone in patients with unresectable advanced IHCC. Controlled randomized trials are required to determine whether XP-CCRT is a primary treatment option for patients with unresectable advanced IHCC.
    Radiation Oncology 12/2013; 8(1):292. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and compare the findings with that of a previous cohort. Overall, 1972 HCC patients diagnosed and treated at the National Cancer Center, Korea between 2004 and 2009 were enrolled. The data of this cohort were compared with those of a previous cohort (2000-2003) from the same institution. In all (mean age, 56.4 years; 1642 men), 74.6% was hepatitis B virus (HBV) positive, 81.6% were Child-Pugh (CP) class A, and 64.4% was Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage C. The modified Union for International Cancer Control (mUICC) stage I, II, III, IVa, and IVb was found in 8.9%, 29.6%, 24.8%, 23.1%, and 13.6% patients, respectively. The most common initial treatment was transarterial chemotherapy (58.3%), followed by resection (18.6%). The 5-year survival rate of BCLC stage 0, A, B, and C were 79.6%, 67.2%, 33.9%, and 17.1%, respectively. The performance status, BCLC stage, mUICC stage, CP class, model for end-stage liver disease score, tumor characteristics, portal vein tumor invasion, and serum alpha-fetoprotein level proved to be independent prognostic variables. Overall survival in the present cohort was better than that in the previous cohort (hazard ratio, 0.829; 95% confidence interval, 0.754-0.912), especially for advanced HCC patients with HBV-positive status. This cohort study provides valuable insights into the characteristics of HCC in Korean patients. Our findings may help develop clinical trials, treatment strategies, and prognosis systems for HCC patients in HBV-endemic areas.
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 12/2013; · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective. Radiation-induced hemorrhagic gastroduodenal vascular ectasia (GDVE) is rare but difficult to manage. Argon plasma coagulation (APC) has not yet been evaluated in the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic GDVE. The efficacy of APC in patients with radiation-induced hemorrhagic GDVE has been investigated in this article. Material and methods. Eighteen patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by radiation-induced GDVE, including 13 with hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 with pancreatic cancer, and 2 with cholangiocarcinoma, were treated with APC. The efficacy of APC was retrospectively evaluated, based on cessation of macroscopic GI bleeding, resolution or stabilization of anemia and transfusion dependence, endoscopic ablation of almost all vascular lesions, complications, and recurrence. Results. Mean patient age was 59 years (range 42-80 years). The median time from radiation to GDVE diagnosis was 4.6 months (range 3.3-21.5 months). The median number of APC sessions per patient was 2.4 (range 1-4). All 18 patients showed an endoscopic response to APC treatment, with sustained increases in mean hemoglobin level, from 6.6 g/dL (range 2.9-9.5g/dL) to 9.7 g/dL (range 7.1-12.7 g/dL) (p < 0.001), and decreased dependence on transfusion, from 9.1 (range 0-30) to 4.1 (range 0-15) units of packed red blood cells per patient (p = 0.038) after last endoscopic eradication by APC treatment. There were no major procedure-related adverse events or deaths. At a median follow up of 4.7 months (range 0.6-24.5 months), none of the patients experienced recurrence of GDVE. Conclusions. APC showed short-term effectiveness and safety in the treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic GDVE.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 11/2013; · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Open-label, phase III trial evaluating whether sunitinib was superior or equivalent to sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer. Patients were stratified and randomly assigned to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg once per day or sorafenib 400 mg twice per day. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Early trial termination occurred for futility and safety reasons. A total of 1,074 patients were randomly assigned to the study (sunitinib arm, n = 530; sorafenib arm, n = 544). For sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, median OS was 7.9 versus 10.2 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; one-sided P = .9990; two-sided P = .0014); median progression-free survival (PFS; 3.6 v 3.0 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8785; two-sided P = .2286) and time to progression (TTP; 4.1 v 3.8 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8312; two-sided P = .3082) were comparable. Median OS was similar among Asian (7.7 v 8.8 months; HR, 1.21; one-sided P = .9829) and hepatitis B-infected patients (7.6 v 8.0 months; HR, 1.10; one-sided P = .8286), but was shorter with sunitinib in hepatitis C-infected patients (9.2 v 17.6 months; HR, 1.52; one-sided P = .9835). Sunitinib was associated with more frequent and severe adverse events (AEs) than sorafenib. Common grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (29.7%) and neutropenia (25.7%) for sunitinib; hand-foot syndrome (21.2%) for sorafenib. Discontinuations owing to AEs were similar (sunitinib, 13.3%; sorafenib, 12.7%). OS with sunitinib was not superior or equivalent but was significantly inferior to sorafenib. OS was comparable in Asian and hepatitis B-infected patients. OS was superior in hepatitis C-infected patients who received sorafenib. Sunitinib-treated patients reported more frequent and severe toxicity.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually receive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or systemic therapies with intermediate and advanced-stage disease. However, intermediate-stage HCC patients often have unsatisfactory clinical outcomes with repeated TACE and there is considerable uncertainty surrounding the criteria for repeating or stopping TACE treatment. In July 2012, an Expert Panel Opinion on Interventions in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (EPOIHCC) was re-convened in Shanghai in an attempt to provide a consensus on the practice of TACE, particularly in regard to evaluating TACE 'failure'. To that end, current clinical practice throughout Asia was reviewed in detail including safety and efficacy data on TACE alone as well as in combination with targeted systemic therapies for intermediate HCC. This review summarizes the evidence discussed at the meeting and provides expert recommendations regarding the use of TACE for unresectable intermediate-stage HCC. A key consensus of the Expert Panel was that the current definitions of TACE failure are not useful in differentiating between situations where TACE is no longer effective in controlling disease locally vs. systemically. By redefining these concepts, it may be possible to provide a clearer indication of when TACE should be repeated and more importantly, when TACE should be discontinued.
    Liver international: official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver 09/2013; · 3.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brivanib is a dual inhibitor of vascular-endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor receptors that are implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our multinational, randomized, double-blind, phase III trial compared brivanib with sorafenib as first-line treatment for HCC. Advanced HCC patients who had no prior systemic therapy were randomly assigned (ratio, 1:1) to receive sorafenib 400 mg twice daily orally (n = 578) or brivanib 800 mg once daily orally (n = 577). Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included time to progression (TTP), objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST), and safety. The primary end point of OS noninferiority for brivanib versus sorafenib in the per-protocol population (n = 1,150) was not met (hazard ratio [HR], 1.06; 95.8% CI, 0.93 to 1.22), based on the prespecified margin (upper CI limit for HR ≤ 1.08). Median OS was 9.9 months for sorafenib and 9.5 months for brivanib. TTP, ORR, and DCR were similar between the study arms. Most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events for sorafenib and brivanib were hyponatremia (9% and 23%, respectively), AST elevation (17% and 14%), fatigue (7% and 15%), hand-foot-skin reaction (15% and 2%), and hypertension (5% and 13%). Discontinuation as a result of adverse events was 33% for sorafenib and 43% for brivanib; rates for dose reduction were 50% and 49%, respectively. Our study did not meet its primary end point of OS noninferiority for brivanib versus sorafenib. However, both agents had similar antitumor activity, based on secondary efficacy end points. Brivanib had an acceptable safety profile, but was less well-tolerated than sorafenib.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brivanib is a selective dual inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor receptors implicated in tumorigenesis and angiogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An unmet medical need persists for patients with HCC whose tumors do not respond to sorafenib or who cannot tolerate it. This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessed brivanib in patients with HCC who had been treated with sorafenib. In all, 395 patients with advanced HCC who progressed on/after or were intolerant to sorafenib were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive brivanib 800 mg orally once per day plus best supportive care (BSC) or placebo plus BSC. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included time to progression (TTP), objective response rate (ORR), and disease control rate based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) and safety. Median OS was 9.4 months for brivanib and 8.2 months for placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95.8% CI, 0.69 to 1.15; P = .3307). Adjusting treatment effect for baseline prognostic factors yielded an OS HR of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.63 to 1.04; P = .1044). Exploratory analyses showed a median time to progression of 4.2 months for brivanib and 2.7 months for placebo (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.76; P < .001), and an mRECIST ORR of 10% for brivanib and 2% for placebo (odds ratio, 5.72). Study discontinuation due to treatment-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in 61 brivanib patients (23%) and nine placebo patients (7%). The most frequent treatment-related grade 3 to 4 AEs for brivanib included hypertension (17%), fatigue (13%), hyponatremia (11%), and decreased appetite (10%). In patients with HCC who had been treated with sorafenib, brivanib did not significantly improve OS. The observed benefit in the secondary outcomes of TTP and ORR warrants further investigation.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 08/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although capecitabine has theoretical advantages in the pharmacokinetics, such as higher intratumoral and lower systemic concentration, relative to bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), outcomes of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with capecitabine or bolus 5-FU have not been directly compared in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we retrospectively compared the outcomes, including toxicity, tumor response, and overall survival, of oral capecitabine plus radiotherapy (RT) with bolus 5-FU plus RT, in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Between August 2006 and January 2012, 98 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer received CRT, with 52 receiving concurrent oral capecitabine and 46 receiving bolus injection of 5-FU. Primary tumor and overall response after CRT were evaluated radiologically, and toxicity, tumor response, and overall survival (OS) were compared in the two groups. Baseline clinical parameters of the two groups were similar. The rates of >= Grade 3 hematologic (0% vs. 8.7%, p = 0.045) and non-hematologic (0% vs. 8.7%, p = 0.045) toxicities were significantly lower in the capecitabine group than in the 5-FU group. Primary tumor (30.7% vs. 28.2%, p = 0.658) and overall (13.7% vs. 15.2%, p = 0.273) response rates and median OS time (12.5 months vs. 11.6 months, p = 0.655) were similar in the two groups. Capecitabine plus RT maybe a safe and feasible regimen for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with similar efficacy and low rates of toxicities compared with bolus 5-FU plus RT.
    Radiation Oncology 07/2013; 8(1):160. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The outcomes of sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) and impaired liver function remain unresolved. Although Child-Pugh(CP) classification is widely used for patient categorization, heterogeneity within a given CP class makes the assessment of outcomes less predictable. The aim was to investigate the prognostic significance of CP score components on the outcome of sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC and impaired liver function. Of 1385 consecutive patients with advanced HCC in our center between January 2007 and December 2010, we reviewed the medical records of 325 patients who received sorafenib monotherapy. Median duration of sorafenib was 2.0 months(range, 0.4-24.2), and median follow-up was 4.9 months(range, 0.5-43.4). Disease control rates were significantly higher in CP class A(CPA) than in CP class B(CPB) patients. Median overall survival(OS) was 5.8 months. Subgroups based on CP score showed significantly different OS (months): CPA5, 8.4; CPA6, 5.1; CPB7, 3.5; CPB8-9, 2.6; P<0.001. The presence of ascites was a significant prognostic factor in CPB7 patients(hazard ratio, 2.262; P=0.016). OS of CPB7 patients without ascites was similar to that of CPA6(4.6 months), and was significantly longer than that of CPB7 patients with ascites(2.5 months; P=0.027). OS of CPB7 patients with ascites was similar to that of CPB8-9 patients. CP score was more important than CP class in predicting the outcome of sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced HCC. Among the CP score components, presence of ascites was a significant prognostic factor, especially in CPB7 patients.
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 06/2013; · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) presents with a high burden of disease in East Asian countries. Intermediate-stage HCC as defined by the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system poses a clinical challenge as it includes a heterogeneous population of patients that can vary widely in terms of tumour burden, liver function and disease aetiology. Intermediate HCC patients often have unsatisfactory clinical outcomes with repeated transarterial chemoembolization (TACE, due to non-response of the target tumour or the development of further metastasis indicating progressive disease. In September 2011, an Expert Panel Opinion on Interventions in Hepatocellular Carcinoma (EPOIHCC) was convened in HK in an attempt to provide a consensus on the practice of TACE. To that end, current clinical practice throughout Asia was reviewed in detail including safety and efficacy data on TACE alone as well as in combination with targeted systemic therapies. This review summarises the evidence discussed at the meeting and provides expert recommendation regarding the available therapeutic options for unresectable intermediate stage HCC. A key consensus of the Expert Panel was that in order to improve patient outcomes and long-term survival, the possibility of using TACE in combination with targeted agents given systemically should be explored. While the currently available clinical data is promising, the expected completion of several pivotal phase II and III RCTs will provide further evidence in support of the rationale for combination therapy regimens.
    Liver international: official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver 11/2012; · 3.87 Impact Factor
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    Joong-Won Park, Hyun Beom Kim, In Joon Lee
    Journal of Hepatology 10/2012; · 9.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Palliative chemotherapy is currently the primary therapeutic approach in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of capecitabine plus cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced BTC and to analyze the relationship between the level of CA19-9 and clinical outcome. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who had unresectable, metastatic or recurrent BTC who were treated with capecitabine plus cisplatin. Capecitabine was administered orally at a dose of 1,000 mg/m(2) twice a day for 14 days, followed by a 1-week rest period. Cisplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8 at a dose of 30 mg/m(2) for 60 min every 3 weeks. A total of 176 patients were enrolled. Among the 143 assessable patients, 24 (17%) had a partial response. A complete response was radiologically confirmed in 1 patient who had gallbladder cancer. Sixty-two patients (43%) had stable disease and 56 patients (39%) had progressive disease. With a median follow-up of 5.7 months, the median time-to-progression (TTP) was 3.7 months (95% CI 3.1-4.3) and the median overall survival (OS) was 7.4 months (95% CI 6.1-8.7). There was a significant positive correlation between CA19-9 response and TTP (r = 0.66, p = 0.01). CA19-9 response was also significantly correlated with OS (r = 0.57, p < 0.01). The most common grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea/vomiting [12 patients (6.8%)]. Our results indicate that the capecitabine/cisplatin regimen is well tolerated and has moderate activity against advanced BTC. The CA19-9 response may be a suitable surrogate marker for patients with BTC who are treated with capecitabine/cisplatin.
    Chemotherapy 07/2012; 58(3):225-32. · 2.07 Impact Factor
  • Pancreas 05/2012; 41(4):648-9. · 2.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is determined by the extent of the tumor and the underlying liver function. We aimed to develop a survival model for HCC based on objective parameters including the Model for Endstage Liver Disease (MELD) as a gauge of liver dysfunction. This analysis is based on 477 patients with HCC seen at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1994 and 2008 (derivation cohort) and 904 patients at the Korean National Cancer Center between 2000 and 2003 (validation cohort). Multivariate proportional hazards models and corresponding risk score were created based on baseline demographic, clinical, and tumor characteristics. Internal and external validation of the model was performed. Discrimination and calibration of this new model were compared against existing models including Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC), Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP), and Japan Integrated Staging (JIS) scores. The majority of the patients had viral hepatitis as the underlying liver disease (100% in the derivation cohort and 85% in the validation cohort). The survival model incorporated MELD, age, number of tumor nodules, size of the largest nodule, vascular invasion, metastasis, serum albumin, and alpha-fetoprotein. In cross-validation, the coefficients remained largely unchanged between iterations. Observed survival in the validation cohort matched closely with what was predicted by the model. The concordance (c)-statistic for this model (0.77) was superior to that for BCLC (0.71), CLIP (0.70), or JIS (0.70). The score was able to further classify patient survival within each stage of the BCLC classification. CONCLUSION: A new model to predict survival of HCC patients based on objective parameters provides refined prognostication and supplements the BCLC classification.
    Hepatology 02/2012; 56(2):614-21. · 12.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is an important palliative treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but TACE-induced ischemic injury can upregulate angiogenic factors and is associated with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of concurrent conventional TACE and sorafenib in patients with unresectable HCC. The primary objectives of this prospective, single-arm, phase II study were to evaluate safety and time to progression (TTP). Sorafenib was given 3 days after TACE and was administered for up to 24 weeks. Repeated TACE was performed on demand. Tumor response was assessed every 8 weeks. Fifty patients were treated and followed from July 2009 to May 2011. All patients were in Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage B (82%) or C (18%). The median time of follow-up was 14.9 months and a median of 1 TACE session was given (range, 1-4). The median dose intensity of sorafenib was 68.7% (range, 37.3-100) of 800 mg daily. The most common reasons for dose reduction were hand-foot syndrome and thrombocytopenia. Thirty patients completed the study and 17 patients discontinued sorafenib due to disease progression. The overall median TTP was 7.1 months (95% confidence interval (CI), 4.8-7.5 months): 7.3 months in BCLC stage B; 5.0 months in BCLC stage C. The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 52% (95% CI, 37.3-66.1). Concurrent treatment of unresectable HCC with conventional TACE and sorafenib demonstrates a manageable safety profile and a possibility of promising efficacy.
    Journal of Hepatology 02/2012; 56(6):1336-42. · 9.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brivanib, a selective dual inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor and VEGF signaling, has recently been shown to have activity as first-line treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This phase II open-label study assessed brivanib as second-line therapy in patients with advanced HCC who had failed prior antiangiogenic treatment. Brivanib was administered orally at a dose of 800 mg once daily. The primary objectives were tumor response rate, time to response, duration of response, progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), disease control rate, time to progression (TTP), and safety and tolerability. Forty-six patients were treated. Best responses to treatment with brivanib (N = 46 patients) using modified World Health Organization criteria were partial responses for two patients (4.3%), stable disease for 19 patients (41.3%), and progressive disease for 19 patients (41.3%). The tumor response rate was 4.3%; the disease control rate was 45.7%. Median OS was 9.79 months. Median TTP as assessed by study investigators following second-line treatment with brivanib was 2.7 months. The most common adverse events were fatigue, decreased appetite, nausea, diarrhea, and hypertension. Brivanib had a manageable safety profile and is one of the first agents to show promising antitumor activity in advanced HCC patients treated with prior sorafenib.
    Clinical Cancer Research 01/2012; 18(7):2090-8. · 7.84 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

801 Citations
295.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • National Cancer Center Korea
      • Colorectal Cancer Branch
      Kōyō, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
  • 2013
    • National Taiwan University Hospital
      T’ai-pei, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 2012
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Angeles, California, United States
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
      Scottsdale, AZ, United States
  • 2011
    • Yonsei University Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Korea Medical Research Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea