H. Dechaud

Université de Montpellier 1, Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France

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Publications (165)401.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study intended to compare frozen embryo transfer (FET) outcomes at blastocyst stage according to freezing methods, slow freezing versus vitrification and according to the type of endometrial preparation. A total of 172 FET at blastocyst stage (day 5 or 6) were included retrospectively from April, 2007 to December, 2012. The FET outcomes from slow freezing (group 1, n=86) were compared with those from vitrification (group 2, n=86). More particularly, the survival rate after thawing, as well as implantation and pregnancy rates (clinical and ongoing pregnancy rates) were compared respectively between these two groups, after matching on women's age at freezing day, embryo number and embryo development stage for transfer. Furthermore, for each freezing method, FET outcomes were compared according to the type of endometrial preparation, i.e. natural cycle (group N) versus stimulated cycle (group S). The survival rate as well as implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were significantly higher for FET after vitrification compared to FET after slow freezing (97% vs 85%, P<0.0001; 32% vs 20%, P=0.02; 43% vs 28%, P=0.04, respectively). By taking into account the number of transferred embryos for each group, the multiple pregnancy rate was three-fold higher in the group of FET after vitrification compared to the group of FET after slow freezing but not significantly (27.3% vs 8.3%, NS). However, FET outcomes were not affected significantly by the type of endometrial preparation whatever freezing methods. Nevertheless, the early spontaneous abortion (ESA) rate was lower in the case of embryos that were frozen by vitrification and transferred in natural cycle (group N2 vs group S2: 20% vs 47%, NS). Our study confirms that the survival rate after thawing at blastocyst stage (day 5 or 6) is significantly improved after freezing by vitrification compared to slow freezing method. Likewise, implantation and clinical pregnancy rates are significantly increased in the case of FET at blastocyst stage when these embryos were frozen by vitrification. The results obtained by vitrification are very satisfactory but are also associated with an increased multiple pregnancy rate. Moreover, FET associated with natural or stimulated cycle does not modify significantly the outcomes of attempts, whatever the freezing method. However, the risk of ESA is reduced in the case of FET with natural cycle and after embryo vitrification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.
    Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité 02/2015; 43(3). DOI:10.1016/j.gyobfe.2015.01.012 · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Female fertility preservation in the context of cancer management is crucial for patient's health care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oncofertility practice at our university hospital of Montpellier since 2011. Patients and methods The evaluation of management of young patients referred to Montpellier University Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 for oncofertility counselling before cancer treatment. Results Seventy-one patients were referred to a specialized oncofertility center. Forty-two patients (59.1%) were included in the oncofertility program. Twenty-two patients (31%) were proposed for oocyte vitrification after COS protocol, eight patients (11.3%) for ovarian tissue cryoconservation, seven patients (9.9%) for GnRH injections, three patients (4.2%) ovarian transposition and two patients (2.8%) for embryo cryopreservation. Among the 42 indications of fertility preservation, only 18 will have finally taken place. Conclusion Oncofertility counselling for young patients should now be part of the cancer management. It involves multidisciplinary teams. Further information of both oncologists and patients is needed to improve this new approach in the field of cancer treatments.
  • Fertility and Sterility 09/2014; 102(3):e295. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2014.07.1004 · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of a premature elevation of serum progesterone level, the day of hCG administration in patients under controlled ovarian stimulation during IVF procedure, on human endometrial receptivity is still debated. In the present study, we investigated the endometrial gene expression profile shifts during the prereceptive and receptive secretory stage in patients with normal and elevated serum progesterone level on the day of hCG administration in fifteen patients under stimulated cycles. Then, specific biomarkers of endometrial receptivity in these two groups of patients were tested. Endometrial biopsies were performed on oocyte retrieval day and on day 3 of embryo transfer, respectively, for each patient. Samples were analysed using DNA microarrays and qRT-PCR. The endometrial gene expression shift from the prereceptive to the receptive stage was altered in patients with high serum progesterone level (>1.5 ng/mL) on hCG day, suggesting accelerated endometrial maturation during the periovulation period. This was confirmed by the functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes as it showed downregulation of cell cycle-related genes. Conversely, the profile of endometrial receptivity was comparable in both groups. Premature progesterone rise alters the endometrial gene expression shift between the prereceptive and the receptive stage but does not affect endometrial receptivity.
    BioMed Research International 04/2014; 2014:951937. DOI:10.1155/2014/951937 · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apoptotic cell death has been reported in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos under in vivo and in vitro conditions. BCL-2 family proteins comprise both anti- and pro-apoptotic members, which are likely to play a key role in controlling oocyte and early embryo survival. However, very limited data are available on their expression kinetics during human early embryonic development. Using our DNA microarray data, we analyzed the expression pattern of 21 BCL-2 family genes in human mature MII oocytes, day 3 embryos and day 5/6 blastocysts from patients who underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF). Selected genes were further validated by qRT-PCR and their subcellular localization analyzed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Our results suggest a switch from oocyte-inherited BCL-2 family transcripts, such as BCL2L10, to embryo-produced transcripts after embryonic genome activation, including BIK, BCL2L11 and NOXA. Moreover, the pro-apoptotic gene BCL2L13 was constitutively expressed throughout human early embryonic development. Remarkably, day 3 embryos expressed more BCL-2 pro-apoptotic genes than mature MII oocytes and day 5/6 blastocysts, suggesting that embryos at this stage are more prone to apoptosis. This is further supported by an absence of cleaved Caspase-3 in the oocyte and its presence in the embryo. Using a drug that induces apoptosis (gambogic acid), we were able to show activated Caspase-3 in the oocyte in addition to an alteration of BCL2L13 protein localization. Similarly BCL2L13 localization was altered in degenerated oocytes. This study opens new perspectives for understanding the molecular regulation of human oocyte and pre-implantation embryo survival and death.
    Current Medicinal Chemistry 09/2013; 21(11). DOI:10.2174/09298673113206660278 · 3.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In in vitro fertilization cycles, both HP-hMG and rFSH gonadotropin treatments are widely used to control human follicle development. The objectives of this study are (i) to characterize and compare gene expression profiles in cumulus cells (CCs) of periovulatory follicles obtained from patients stimulated with HP-hMG or rFSH in a GnRH antagonist cycle and (ii) to examine their relationship with in vitro embryo development, using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Genes that were upregulated in HP-hMG-treated CCs are involved in lipid metabolism (GM2A) and cell-to-cell interactions (GJA5). Conversely, genes upregulated in rFSH-treated CCs are implicated in cell assembly and organization (COL1A1 and COL3A1). Interestingly, some genes specific to each gonadotropin treatment (NPY1R and GM2A for HP-hMG; GREM1 and OSBPL6 for rFSH) were associated with day 3 embryo quality and blastocyst grade at day 5, while others (STC2 and PTX3) were related to in vitro embryo quality in both gonadotropin treatments. These genes may prove valuable as biomarkers of in vitro embryo quality.
    09/2013; 2013:354582. DOI:10.1155/2013/354582
  • Fertility and Sterility 09/2013; 100(3):S388. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.07.702 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • T. Al Edani · S. Assou · A. Gala · O. Ait-Ahmed · H. Dechaud · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2013; 100(3):S147. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.07.1548 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • D. Haouzi · S. Assou · C. Vincens · S. Bringer · H. Dechaud · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2013; 100(3):S471. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.07.449 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • C. Brunet · M. Picandet · N. Molinari · T. Anahory · A. Gala · H. Dechaud
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2013; 100(3):S264-S265. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.07.1109 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • Annales d Endocrinologie 09/2013; 74(4):318. DOI:10.1016/j.ando.2013.07.259 · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: What is the expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs) in human cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs)? Several miRNAs are enriched in cumulus cells (CCs) or oocytes, and are predicted to target genes involved in biological functions of the COC. The transcriptional profiles of human MII oocytes and the surrounding CCs are known. However, very limited data are available about post-transcriptional regulators, such as miRNAs. This is the first study focussing on the identification and quantification of small RNAs, including miRNAs, in human oocytes and CCs using a deep-sequencing approach. MII oocytes and CCs were collected from women who underwent IVF. Using the Illumina/deep-sequencing technology, we analyzed the small RNAome of pooled MII oocytes (n = 24) and CC samples (n = 20). The mRNA targets of CC and MII oocyte miRNAs were identified using in silico prediction algorithms. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, genome-wide gene expression was studied in oocytes (10 pools of 19 ± 3 oocytes/each) and 10 individual CC samples. TaqMan miRNA assays were used to confirm the sequencing results in independent pools of MII oocytes (3 pools of 8 ± 3 oocytes/each) and CC samples (3 pools of 7 ± 3 CCs/each). The functional role of one miRNA, MIR23a, was assessed in primary cultures of human CCs. Deep sequencing of small RNAs yielded more than 1 million raw reads. By mapping reads with a single location to the human genome, known miRNAs that were abundant in MII oocytes (MIR184, MIR100 and MIR10A) or CCs (MIR29a, MIR30d, MIR21, MIR93, MIR320a, MIR125a and the LET7 family) were identified. Predicted target genes of the oocyte miRNAs were associated with the regulation of transcription and cell cycle, whereas genes targeted by CC miRNAs were involved in extracellular matrix and apoptosis. Comparison of the predicted miRNA target genes and mRNA microarray data resulted in a list of 224 target genes that were differentially expressed in MII oocytes and CCs, including PTGS2, CTGF and BMPR1B that are important for cumulus-oocyte communication. Functional analysis using primary CC cultures revealed that BCL2 and CYP19A1 mRNA levels were decreased upon MIR23a overexpression. Only known miRNAs were investigated in the present study on COCs. Moreover, the source of the material is MII oocytes that failed to fertilize. The present findings suggest that miRNA could play a role in the regulation of the oocyte and CC crosstalk. This work was partially supported by a grant from Ferring Pharmaceuticals. The authors of the study have no conflict of interest to report. Not applicable.
    Human Reproduction 07/2013; 28(11). DOI:10.1093/humrep/det321 · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • D Haouzi · S Assou · C Monzo · C Vincens · H Dechaud · S Hamamah
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    ABSTRACT: STUDY QUESTION: Oocyte developmental competence is altered in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); is gene expression in cumulus cells (CCs) from mature metaphase II oocytes of patients with PCOS altered as well? SUMMARY ANSWER: Compared with CCs from non-PCOS patients, the gene expression profile of CCs isolated from mature oocytes of patients with PCOS present alterations that could explain the abnormal folliculogenesis and reduced oocyte competence in such patients. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Abnormal mRNA expression of several members of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family in CCs from PCOS patients was previously reported. Moreover, the whole transcriptome has been investigated in cultured CCs from PCOS patients. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION: This retrospective study included six PCOS patients diagnosed following the Rotterdam Criteria and six non-PCOS patients who all underwent ICSI for male infertility in the assisted reproduction technique (ART) Department of Montpellier University Hospital, between 2009 and 2011. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTINGAND METHODS: CCs from PCOS and non-PCOS patients who underwent controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) were isolated mechanically before ICSI. Gene expression profiles were analysed using the microarray technology and the Significance Analysis of Microarray was applied to compare the expression profiles of CCs from PCOS and non-PCOS patients. MAIN RESULTS: The gene expression profile of CCs from patients with PCOS was significantly different from that of CCs from non-PCOS patients. Specifically, CCs from women with PCOS were characterized by abnormal expression of many growth factors, including members of the epidermal growth factor-like (EGFR, EREG and AREG) and IGF-like families (IGF1R, IGF2R, IGF2BP2 and IGFBP2), that are known to play a role in oocyte competence. In addition, mRNA transcripts of factors involved in steroid metabolism, such as CYP11A1, CYP1B1, CYP19A1 and CYP2B7P1, were deregulated in PCOS CCs, and this could explain the abnormal steroidogenesis observed in these women. Functional annotation of the differentially expressed genes suggests that defects in the transforming growth factor β and estrogen receptors signalling cascades may contribute to the reduced oocyte developmental competence in patients with PCOS. LIMITATIONS AND REASONS FOR CAUTION: Owing to the strict selection criteria (similar age, weight and reasons for ART), this study included a small sample size (six cases and six controls), and thus, further investigations using a large cohort of patients are needed to confirm these results. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: This study opens a new perspective for understanding the pathogenesis of PCOS. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: This work was partially supported by a grant from the Ferring Pharmaceutical. The authors of the study have no competing interests to report. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Not applicable.
    Human Reproduction 09/2012; 27(12). DOI:10.1093/humrep/des325 · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S154-S155. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.571 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • I. Boumela · S. Assou · D. Haouzi · H. Dechaud · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S165. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.608 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • D. Haouzi · C. Hirtz · H. Dechaud · L. Tiers · S. Lehmann · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S226. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.822 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • S. Assou · E. Pourret · D. Haouzi · C. Vincent · H. Dechaud · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S21. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.078 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • C. Monzo · D. Haouzi · S. Assou · C. Vincens · H. Dechaud · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S226. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.821 · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • H. Dechaud · D. Haouzi · S. Assou · C. Monzo · S. Hamamah
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2012; 98(3):S209. DOI:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.757 · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives To evaluate if internal version with ruptured membranes is a risk factor of cesarean section for the second twin.Patients and methodsTwo hundred and fifty-nine twins vaginal deliveries after 33 weeks of gestation from 1997 to 2009 in a level 3 maternity. A retrospective case–control study comparing two groups: cases of cesarean section on second twin and five twins vaginal deliveries following the case. Active management of the second twin delivery was performed with a short intertwin delivery.ResultsEleven cesarean sections on the second twin were performed (4.2%). The main indication was failure of internal version. The risk of cesarean section was significantly greater when the internal version was performed with ruptured membranes (OR: 25.4 IC 95% [2.3–275.7] P < 0.003) and when intertwin time delivery interval was increased (8.1 ± 5.1 vs 16.7 ± 6.3, P < 0.001).Discussion and conclusionThe rupture of amniotic membranes before or during the internal podalic version is associated with a risk of failure and cesarean for the second twin. We recommend to perform the internal podalic version with unruptured membranes according to the French recommendations.
    Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité 07/2012; 40(s 7–8):402–405. DOI:10.1016/j.gyobfe.2012.02.023 · 0.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
401.94 Total Impact Points


  • 2000–2014
    • Université de Montpellier 1
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2010–2012
    • Institut de Recherche en Cancerologie de Montpellier
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 1997–2010
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier
      • • Département de médecine interne
      • • Département de biologie de la reproduction
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2007
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2005
    • Institut de Génétique Humaine
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2003
    • Hôpital Universitaire Necker
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • University Hospital Estaing of Clermont-Ferrand
      Clermont, Auvergne, France
  • 2000–2002
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • 2001
    • College of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Leon
      Léon, Aquitaine, France