E J Swift

University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, United States

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Publications (157)187.14 Total impact

  • Dirk Wiechmann, Dan Grauer, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 03/2014; · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Post and core systems are commonly used to restore endodontically treated teeth. A durable bond between fiber posts and dentin contributes to the success of the restorative treatment. Different irrigants are used during post space preparation and various studies have investigated the effects of these chemical agents on bond strength and dentin morphology.
    American journal of dentistry. 02/2014; 27(1):3-6.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effect of several dentin surface treatments on fracture resistance of root filled teeth containing bonded fibre posts. The roots of 84 single-canal premolars were instrumented, filled with gutta-percha and randomly divided into seven groups. The coronal 9 mm of gutta-percha was removed to create a post space. In the experimental groups, canals were irrigated with distilled water, 37% phosphoric acid, 5% sodium hypochlorite, 17% EDTA, 5% sodium hypochlorite followed by 17% EDTA or 5% sodium hypochlorite followed by 10% ascorbic acid. Fibre posts were cemented using Panavia F2.0 resin cement, and the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin blocks. Following 1-week storage in an incubator, specimens were thermocycled and their fracture resistance was determined using a universal testing machine. Data were analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Mean fracture resistance values ranged from 465.8 N in specimens treated with sodium hypochlorite and ascorbic acid to 739.1 N for those treated with sodium hypochlorite only. However, differences in fracture resistance were not statistically significant (P = 0.114). None of the surface treatments improved vertical fracture resistance of root filled teeth containing bonded fibre posts.
    Dental Traumatology 11/2013; · 1.00 Impact Factor
  • Article: Abstracts.
    Jorge Perdigão, Edward J Swift
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    ABSTRACT: Sales of self-etch adhesive systems have grown considerably over the last 10 to 12 years. One of the most important factors contributing to this growth is the perception that self-etch adhesives cause less postoperative sensitivity than etch-and-rinse adhesives. Certainly, there is much anecdotal evidence supporting this perception. But what does the science say? This Critical Appraisal presents evidence from several clinical trials of postoperative sensitivity in posterior composite restorations.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 08/2013; 25(4):284-8. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Jorge Perdigao, Swift EJ
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sales of self-etch adhesive systems have grown considerably over the last 10 to 12 years. One of the most important factors contributing to this growth is the perception that self-etch adhesives cause less postoperative sensitivity than etch-and-rinse adhesives. Certainly, there is much anecdotal evidence supporting this perception. But what does the science say? This Critical Appraisal presents evidence from several clinical trials of postoperative sensitivity in posterior composite restorations.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 06/2013; · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the effect of peroxide-based bleaching agents on teeth stained with AH26 sealer (Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany), using digital images and computer analysis. METHODOLOGY: Thirty-five maxillary central incisors were root filled, and the internal walls of the access cavity were coated with AH26 sealer. Internal bleaching commenced 4 months after the root fillings. In three experimental groups (n = 10), the teeth were bleached for 21 days using 45% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel, 45% sodium perborate + carbamide peroxide (SP + CP) or sodium perborate + distilled water (SP + W). No bleaching was undertaken in the control group. Digital images of each specimen were made before treatment, 4 months after endodontic treatment and 2 weeks after bleaching. Colour differences (∆E) were calculated by determining L*a*b* values using digital images and imaging software. Differences between the original colour and sealer-stained teeth, between sealer-stained and bleached teeth and between original colour and bleached teeth were calculated. Data were analysed using one-way anova and Duncan tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Colour differences between baseline and sealer staining were in the range of 8.1-9.9, but differences between the groups were not significant. After bleaching, the degree of lightening was essentially identical for the carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate + carbamide peroxide groups, but was significantly greater (P < 0.05) in these two groups than in the sodium perborate + water group. CONCLUSION: For bleaching AH26 sealer-stained teeth, carbamide peroxide gel and carbamide peroxide gel mixed with sodium perborate were equally effective and significantly better than sodium perborate mixed with water.
    International Endodontic Journal 04/2013; · 2.05 Impact Factor
  • Frederick A Rueggeberg, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 04/2013; 25(2):82-84. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 12/2012; 24(6):365-6. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Ayesha Swarn, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 10/2012; 24(5):296-8. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Ayesha Swarn, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 08/2012; 24(4):233-5. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 08/2012; 24(4):287-91. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Dan Grauer, Gavin C Heymann, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 06/2012; 24(3):155-9. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Edward J Swift
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A recent Medline search revealed 214 publications related to the search term "self-adhesive resin cements." The Journal published a Critical Appraisal on these materials by Burgess and colleagues in late 2010 (J Esthet Restor Dent 2010;22:412-9). One hundred fifty-eight of those were published in 2009 or later, so the knowledge base on this subject is growing rapidly. With that in mind, we thought it would be helpful to provide an update. The update will be presented in two parts. Here in Part I, the specific topics addressed are bonding to tooth structure, bonding to zirconia ceramics, and effects of curing mode.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 06/2012; 24(3):221-5. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Gavin C Heymann, Dan Grauer, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 04/2012; 24(2):83-7. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated contact angle and shear bond strength of three commercial zirconia primers and compared them to a recently developed fluorination pre-treatment. Earlier investigations reported that plasma fluorinated zirconia modifies the chemical bonding structure creating a more reactive surface. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (LAVA, 3M ESPE) plates were highly polished using 3μm diamond paste (R(a) ∼200nm) prior to pretreatments. After primer and fluorination treatment, contact angles were measured to quantify surface hydrophobicity before and after ethanol clean. Additionally, simple shear bond tests were performed to measure the adhesion strength to a composite resin. Plasma fluorination produced the lowest contact angle (7.8°) and the highest shear bond strength (37.3MPa) suggesting this pretreatment facilitates a more "chemically" active surface for adhesive bonding. It is hypothesized that plasma fluorination increase hydroxylation at the surface, making it more reactive, thus allowing for covalent bonding between zirconia surface and resin cement. A strong correlation was observed between contact angle and adhesion strength for all specimens; a relationship which may help understand the frequency and modes of failures, clinically. It is also believed that this surface treatment can increase long-term viability of zirconia restorations over other adhesive techniques.
    Dental materials: official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials 02/2012; 28(6):604-8. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 02/2012; 24(1):3-9. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • JEFFREY R. PIASCIK, EDWARD J. SWIFT
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    ABSTRACT: The use of zirconia for dental applications has increased substantially over the past decade. This is evident from the wide variety of commercial products available on today's market and the wealth of information in the scientific literature. Its uses range from single‐unit crowns and fixed‐partial dentures to entire dental implant systems and nanoparticle fillers in composite resins. Zirconia, sometimes described as “ceramic steel,” possesses the ideal properties for dental use: superior strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance, excellent wear properties, and biocompatibility. However, the nonreactive surface of zirconia presents a consistent issue of poor adhesion to other materials (synthetic or tissue). Here, we look at several research manuscripts that describe approaches and pretreatments to increase zirconia surface reactivity for enhanced adhesion with resin cements.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 01/2012; 24(6). · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: statement of problem:  Self-etch adhesives typically are mildly acidic and therefore less effective than etch-and-rinse adhesives for bonding to enamel.   The purpose of this study was to evaluate the enamel and dentin shear bond strengths of a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, OptiBond XTR (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA, USA).   The labial surfaces of 80 bovine teeth were ground to create flat, 600-grit enamel or dentin surfaces. Composite was bonded to enamel or dentin using the new two-step self-etch system or a three-step etch-and-rinse (OptiBond FL, Kerr), two-step self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray America, Houston, TX, USA), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno IV, Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA). Following storage in water for 24 hours, shear bond strengths were determined using a universal testing machine. The enamel and dentin data sets were subjected to separate analysis of variance and Tukey's tests. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the effects of each system on enamel.   Mean shear bond strengths to enamel ranged from 18.1 MPa for Xeno IV to 41.0 MPa for OptiBond FL. On dentin, the means ranged from 33.3 MPa for OptiBond FL to 47.1 MPa for Clearfil SE Bond. OptiBond XTR performed as well as Clearfil SE Bond on dentin and as well as OptiBond FL on enamel. Field emission scanning electron microscope revealed that OptiBond XTR produced an enamel etch pattern that was less defined than that of OptiBond FL (37.5% phosphoric acid) but more defined than that of Clearfil SE Bond or Xeno IV. Conclusion:  The new two-step self-etch adhesive system formed excellent bonds to enamel and dentin in vitro. OptiBond XTR, a new two-step self-etch adhesive system, is a promising material for bonding to enamel as well as to dentin.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 12/2011; 23(6):390-6. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Article: Turbo tips.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 10/2011; 23(5):294-5. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Kraig S Vandewalle, Edward J Swift
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 08/2011; 23(4):201-4. · 0.96 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
187.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Minnesota Twin Cities
      • Department of Restorative Sciences
      Minneapolis, MN, United States
    • Isfahan University of Medical Sciences
      • School of Dentistry
      Eşfahān, Ostan-e Esfahan, Iran
  • 2008–2013
    • Georgia Health Sciences University
      • • Department of Oral Rehabilitation
      • • College of Dental Medicine
      Augusta, GA, United States
    • Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 1994–2013
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • • Department of Operative Dentistry
      • • Department of Orthodontics
      • • School of Dentistry
      • • Department of Endodontics
      North Carolina, United States
    • University of Mississippi
      • School of Dentistry
      Oxford, MS, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Colorado
      • Department of Restorative Dentistry
      Denver, CO, United States
    • University of Southern California
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2011
    • Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
    • Baylor College of Dentistry
      • Department of Periodontics
      Dallas, Texas, United States
    • University of Florence
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
    • Air University
      Maxwell, California, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • • Department of Orthodontics
      • • Department of Pediatric Dentistry
      Seattle, WA, United States
    • Seattle Children's Hospital
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2001–2010
    • University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
      • Department of Restorative Dentistry and Prosthodontics
      Houston, TX, United States
  • 2009
    • T.C. Süleyman Demirel Üniversitesi
      • Faculty of Dentistry
      Hamitabat, Isparta, Turkey
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2002–2006
    • Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans
      • Department of Prosthodontics
      New Orleans, LA, United States
  • 2003
    • United States Air Force
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1989–1996
    • University of Iowa
      • • Department of Operative Dentistry
      • • College of Dentistry
      Iowa City, IA, United States
  • 1993
    • Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
      Pôrto de São Francisco dos Casaes, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil