Mariana A Hacker

Instituto Evandro Chagas, Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil

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Publications (41)70.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to XDR-TB, is pressing. Our group has recently described that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacy of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, and atorvastatin effect on BALB/c mice M. leprae infection. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model we observed atorvastatin efficacy in control M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against M. bovis, M. leprae and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that statins association with the actual multidrug therapy could effectively reduce mycobacteria viability and tissue lesion in Leprosy and Tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 07/2014; · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many articles have shown that HIV infection can modify the clinical course of leprosy, but very scant epidemiological and clinical data about this co-infection are available in the peer-reviewed literature. We herein describe the geographical distribution and demographic characteristics of 92 HIV/Mycobacterium leprae co-infected patients assisted in a Brazilian Leprosy referral center. A multivariate analysis was performed in order to establish clinical factors associated with type 1 reaction. Co-infected patient admissions have steadily increased over the last years at this referral center. Most patients were men, with a mean age of 32.3 years and presenting with the paucibacillary form of leprosy. The use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) was the only factor associated with type 1 reaction. Most patients were living in the metropolitan area and the north sub area of Rio de Janeiro City. Co-infected patients receiving ART have a greater chance to develop type 1 reaction. Patients living with both HIV and leprosy are likely to live in regions characterized by a high density impoverished population.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 12/2013; · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the risk factors related to worsening of physical disabilities after treatment discharge among patients with leprosy administered 12 consecutive monthly doses of multidrug therapy (MDT/WHO). Cohort study was carried out at the Leprosy Laboratory in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated patients with multibacillary leprosy treated (MDT/WHO) between 1997 and 2007. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the relationship between the onset of physical disabilities after release from treatment and epidemiological and clinical characteristics. The total observation time period for the 368 patients was 1 570 person-years (PY), averaging 4.3 years per patient. The overall incidence rate of worsening of disability was 6.5/100 PY. Among those who began treatment with no disability, the incidence rate of physical disability was 4.5/100 PY. Among those who started treatment with Grade 1 or 2 disabilities, the incidence rate of deterioration was 10.5/100 PY. The survival analysis evidenced that when disability grade was 1, the risk was 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02-2.56), when disability was 2, the risk was 2.37 (95% CI 1.35-4.16), and when the number of skin lesions was 15 or more, an HR = 1.97 (95% CI: 1.07-3.63). Patients with neuritis showed a 65% increased risk of worsening of disability (HR = 1.65 [95% CI: 1.08-2.52]). Impairment at diagnosis was the main risk factor for neurological worsening after treatment/MDT. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of reactional episodes remain the main means of preventing physical disabilities.
    Tropical Medicine & International Health 09/2013; 18(9):1145-53. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vitro stimulation of whole blood or isolated peripheral blood cells with specific antigens is used for several purposes. We sought to identify a reliable, reproducible, fast and feasible in vitro method to assess human cellular immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In contrast to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) culture, a whole blood assay (WBA) provides a more physiological environment, which may provide a broader assessment of serum biomarker, biosignature profiles. Twenty-three asymptomatic individuals with M. tuberculosis infection were recruited. Total cells from the WBA (diluted 1:3 in completed RPMI) and PBMC (2x10(5) cells/ml) plus M. tuberculosis Ag85A, Ag85B, ESAT-6 and M. bovis 65kDa were characterized by flow cytometry, then added in 96-well plates and on day 5 plasma and supernatants were harvested for detection of 17 cytokines by a Luminex array system. There was agreement between PBMC and WBA for IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1β. There was evidence toward higher IL-10 (p≤0.049) and G-CSF (p≤0.012) plasma production, and higher IL-1β (p≤0.048), IL-4 (p≤0.044), IL-12p70 (p≤0.006), IL-17 (p≤0.002) and GM-CSF (p≤0.049) production for PBMC vs. WBA. Both methods provided virtually no reaction to the internal, negative control. Due to technical issues linked to data out of range, IL-8 data were not considered. These results suggest that, depending on the method employed, PBMC and/or WBA techniques provide fine conditions for the model proposed and thus whole blood cultures are well-suited low-cost proxy-measures during search for serum biomarkers.
    Acta tropica 04/2013; · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987-2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70), socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71). Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed.
    Journal of Tropical Medicine 01/2013; 2013:596316.
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    ABSTRACT: Contact surveillance is a valuable strategy for controlling leprosy. A dynamic cohort study of leprosy contacts was initiated in 1987 at Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. The objective of this work was to review the data on the major risk factors leading up to the infectious stage of the disease, estimate incidence rates of leprosy in the cohort and characterise the risk factors for the disease among the contacts under surveillance. The incidence rate of leprosy among contacts of leprosy patients was estimated at 0.01694 cases per person-year in the first five years of follow-up. The following factors were associated with acquiring the disease: (i) not receiving the BCG vaccine, (ii) a negative Mitsuda reaction and (iii) contact with a patient with a multibacillary clinical form of leprosy. The contacts of index patients who had high bacilloscopic index scores > 1 were at especially high risk of infection. The following factors were associated with infection, which was defined as a seropositive reaction for anti-phenolic glicolipid-1 IgM: (i) young age (< 20 years), (ii) a low measured Mitsuda reaction (< 5 mm) and (iii) contact with an index patient who had a high bacilloscopic index. BCG vaccination and re-vaccination were shown to be protective among household contacts. The main conclusions of this study indicate an urgent need for additional leprosy control strategies in areas with a high incidence of the disease.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 12/2012; 107(8):1054-9. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze a profile of patients treated at a national leprosy outpatient referral clinic in metropolitan Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, over a period of more than two decades, and the subgroup of nationally registered leprosy cases from the same residential area, as well as all registered cases statewide. An observational, descriptive analysis was carried out for patients treated from 1986 to 2007 at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic (Ambulatório Souza Araújo, ASA), a national referral center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) that serves clients from the city of Rio de Janeiro and other municipalities in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro State. Demographic and clinical data for the subgroup of leprosy cases registered with Brazil's National Disease Notification System (Sistema Nacional de Informação de Agravos de Notificação, SINAN) between 2001 and 2007 and residing in the same municipalities as the ASA patients, and for all registered cases statewide, were also analyzed. Among the ASA patients, there was a decrease in average family income (from 3.9 to 2.7 times the minimum salary between the periods 1998-2002 and 2003-2007); the proportion of multibacillary (MB) patients (from 52.7% to 46.9%); and the proportion of patients younger than 15 years old (from 12.8% to 8.7%). Among the MB patients, the average initial and final bacilloscopic indices were significantly higher in 2003-2007. Compared with the SINAN cases, more ASA cases involved disability and were younger than 15 years old. Patients living with leprosy in the metropolitan area of the state of Rio de Janeiro belong to the most deprived social strata and have not benefited from the overall improvement in socioeconomic conditions in Brazil.
    Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública 06/2012; 31(6):485-91. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed with 10 paucibacillary (PB) and 12 multibacillary (MB) patients evaluated at diagnosis and one year after cessation of multidrug therapy (MDT). Peripheral nerve function was assessed clinically and by means of the sympathetic skin response, skin vasomotor reflex, and nerve conduction study (NCS). At diagnosis, 73% of the total 22 patients had nerve function impairment (NFI). Autonomic function (χ(2)= 5.5, P= 0.019) and NCS (χ(2)= 7.765, P= 0.01) were significantly more altered in MB than PB patients. At final evaluation, NFI of the MB patients had worsened, especially among the six who had leprosy reaction. As the NFI of PB patients showed improvement, a significant difference between the two groups (χ(2)= 12.320, P= 0.001) was observed. A high prevalence of neuropathy was observed in newly diagnosed patients. Associating different tests with a thorough clinical neurological evaluation increases detection rates.
    Brain and behavior. 05/2012; 2(3):249-55.
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    ABSTRACT: During recent years, comparative genomic analysis has allowed the identification of Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes with potential application for the diagnosis of leprosy. In a previous study, 58 synthetic peptides derived from these sequences were tested for their ability to induce production of IFN-γ in PBMC from endemic controls (EC) with unknown exposure to M. leprae, household contacts of leprosy patients and patients, indicating the potential of these synthetic peptides for the diagnosis of sub- or preclinical forms of leprosy. In the present study, the patterns of IFN-γ release of the individuals exposed or non-exposed to M. leprae were compared using an Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and the most promising M. leprae peptides for the identification of exposed people were selected. This subset of M. leprae-specific peptides allowed the differentiation of groups of individuals from sites hyperendemic for leprosy versus those from areas with lower level detection rates. A progressive reduction in the IFN-γ levels in response to the peptides was seen when contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients were compared to other less exposed groups, suggesting a down modulation of IFN-γ production with an increase in bacillary load or exposure to M. leprae. The data generated indicate that an IFN-γ assay based on these peptides applied individually or as a pool can be used as a new tool for predicting the magnitude of M. leprae transmission in a given population.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 04/2012; 6(4):e1616. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nerve biopsy examination is an important auxiliary procedure for diagnosing pure neural leprosy (PNL). When acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are not detected in the nerve sample, the value of other nonspecific histological alterations should be considered along with pertinent clinical, electroneuromyographical and laboratory data (the detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA with polymerase chain reaction and the detection of serum anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 antibodies) to support a possible or probable PNL diagnosis. Three hundred forty nerve samples [144 from PNL patients and 196 from patients with non-leprosy peripheral neuropathies (NLN)] were examined. Both AFB-negative and AFB-positive PNL samples had more frequent histopathological alterations (epithelioid granulomas, mononuclear infiltrates, fibrosis, perineurial and subperineurial oedema and decreased numbers of myelinated fibres) than the NLN group. Multivariate analysis revealed that independently, mononuclear infiltrate and perineurial fibrosis were more common in the PNL group and were able to correctly classify AFB-negative PNL samples. These results indicate that even in the absence of AFB, these histopathological nerve alterations may justify a PNL diagnosis when observed in conjunction with pertinent clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 03/2012; 107(2):246-53. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Caused by Mycobacterium leprae (ML), leprosy presents a strong immune-inflammatory component, whose status dictates both the clinical form of the disease and the occurrence of reactional episodes. Evidence has shown that, during the immune-inflammatory response to infection, the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) plays a prominent regulatory role. However, in leprosy, little, if anything, is known about the interaction between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. In the present retrospective study, we measured the serum levels of IGF-I and IGBP-3, its major binding protein. These measurements were taken at diagnosis in nonreactional borderline tuberculoid (NR BT), borderline lepromatous (NR BL), and lepromatous (NR LL) leprosy patients in addition to healthy controls (HC). LL and BL patients who developed reaction during the course of the disease were also included in the study. The serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were evaluated at diagnosis and during development of reversal (RR) or erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reaction by the solid phase, enzyme-labeled, chemiluminescent-immunometric method. The circulating IGF-I/IGFBP-3 levels showed significant differences according to disease status and occurrence of reactional episodes. At the time of leprosy diagnosis, significantly lower levels of circulating IGF-I/IGFBP-3 were found in NR BL and NR LL patients in contrast to NR BT patients and HCs. However, after treatment, serum IGF-I levels in BL/LL patients returned to normal. Notably, the levels of circulating IGF-I at diagnosis were low in 75% of patients who did not undergo ENL during treatment (NR LL patients) in opposition to the normal levels observed in those who suffered ENL during treatment (R LL patients). Nonetheless, during ENL episodes, the levels observed in RLL sera tended to decrease, attaining similar levels to those found in NR LL patients. Interestingly, IGF-I behaved contrary to what was observed during RR episodes in R BL patients. Our data revealed important alterations in the IGF system in relation to the status of the host immune-inflammatory response to ML while at the same time pointing to the circulating IGF-I/IGFBP-3 levels as possible predictive biomarkers for ENL in LL patients at diagnosis.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 12/2011; 11:339. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [This corrects the article on p. e1013 in vol. 5.].
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 08/2011; 5(8). · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The contribution of Mycobacterium bovis to the global burden of tuberculosis (TB) in man is likely to be underestimated due to its dysgonic growth characteristics and because of the absence of pyruvate in most used media is disadvantageous for its primary isolation. In Brazil Mycobacterium culture, identification and susceptibility tests are performed only in TB reference centers, usually for selected cases. Moreover, solid, egg-based, glycerol-containing (without pyruvate supplementation) Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) or Ogawa media are routinely used, unfavouring M. bovis isolation. To determine the importance of M. bovis as a public health threat in Brazil we investigated 3046 suspected TB patients inoculating their clinical samples onto routine L-J and L-J pyruvate enriched media. A total of 1796 specimens were culture positive for Mycobacterium spp. and 702 TB cases were confirmed. Surprisingly we did not detect one single case of M. bovis in the resulting collection of 1674 isolates recovered from M. bovis favourable medium analyzed by conventional and molecular speciation methods. Also, bacillary DNA present on 454 sputum smears from 223 TB patients were OxyR genotyped and none was recognized as M. bovis. Our data indicate that M. bovis importance on the burden of human TB in Brazil is marginal.
    Tuberculosis (Edinburgh, Scotland) 01/2011; 91(1):14-21. · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study Microfasciculation, a perineurial response found in neuropathies, emphasizing its frequency, detailed morphological characteristics and biological significance in pure neural leprosy (PNL), post-treatment leprosy neuropathy (PTLN) and non-leprosy neuropathies (NLN). Morphological characteristics of microfascicles were examined via histological staining methods, immunohistochemical expression of neural markers and transmission electronmicroscopy. The detection of microfasciculation in 18 nerve biopsy specimens [12 PNL, six PTLN but not in the NLN group, was associated strongly with perineurial damage and the presence of a multibacillary inflammatory process in the nerves, particularly in the perineurium. Immunoreactivity to anti-S100 protein, anti-neurofilament, anti-nerve growth receptor and anti-myelin basic protein immunoreactivity was found within microfascicles. Ultrastructural examination of three biopsies showed that fibroblast-perineurial cells were devoid of basement membrane despite perineurial-like NGFr immunoreactivity. Morphological evidence demonstrated that multipotent pericytes from inflammation-activated microvessels could be the origin of fibroblast-perineurial cells. A microfasciculation pattern was found in 10% of leprosy-affected nerves. The microfascicles were composed predominantly of unmyelinated fibres and denervated Schwann cells (SCs) surrounded by fibroblast-perineurial cells. This pattern was found more frequently in leprosy nerves with acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and perineurial damage while undergoing an inflammatory process. Further experimental studies are necessary to elucidate microfascicle formation.
    Histopathology 01/2011; 58(2):304-11. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors associated with developing leprosy among the contacts of newly-diagnosed leprosy patients. A total of 6,158 contacts and 1,201 leprosy patients of the cohort who were diagnosed and treated at the Leprosy Laboratory of Fiocruz from 1987 to 2007 were included. The contact variables analyzed were sex; age; educational and income levels; blood relationship, if any, to the index case; household or non-household relationship; length of time of close association with the index case; receipt of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BGG) vaccine and presence of BCG scar. Index cases variables included sex, age, educational level, family size, bacillary load, and disability grade. Multilevel logistic regression with random intercept was applied. Among the co-prevalent cases, the leprosy-related variables that remained associated with leprosy included type of household contact, [odds ratio (OR) = 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 1.73] and consanguinity with the index case, (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.42-2.51). With respect to the index case variables, the factors associated with leprosy among contacts included up to 4 years of schooling and 4 to 10 years of schooling (OR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.54-4.79 and 2.40, 95% CI: 1.30-4.42, respectively) and bacillary load, which increased the chance of leprosy among multibacillary contacts for those with a bacillary index of one to three and greater than three (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.19-2.17 and OR: 4.07-95% CI: 2.73, 6.09), respectively. Among incident cases, household exposure was associated with leprosy (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.29-2.98), compared with non-household exposure. Among the index case risk factors, an elevated bacillary load was the only variable associated with leprosy in the contacts. Biological and social factors appear to be associated with leprosy among co-prevalent cases, whereas the factors related to the infectious load and proximity with the index case were associated with leprosy that appeared in the incident cases during follow-up.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 01/2011; 5(3):e1013. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Host genetic factors play an important role in the HIV epidemic dynamics, and have been considered in studies assessing susceptibility/resistance to HIV-1 infection as well as clinical evolution. Class I and Class II HLA alleles have been associated with the heterogeneity of HIV-1 infection susceptibility, as protective or risk factors for HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, a 32-base pair deletion in the HIV-1 CCR5 gene-coding region confers resistance to HIV-1 infection in homozygous individuals for the deleted allele. In this study, DNA samples from HIV-1 infected and uninfected injecting drug users (IDUs) from Rio de Janeiro were PCR amplified to determine CCR5 genotypes based on the presence of the CCR5Delta32 mutation and typed for the HLA-B locus, in an attempt to assess possible associations between these genetic factors and susceptibility/resistance to HIV-1 infection. The distribution of CCR5 genotypes between the two IDU groups did not differ. The homozygous mutant genotype Delta32/Delta32 was not found in this study. Except for HLA-B*45 (4.0% vs. 3.0%; p=0.04) and for B*51 (12.1% vs. 4.4%; p=0.002), no statistically significant differences were made evident when analyzing the frequencies of each HLA-B allele between Caucasian and non-Caucasian IDUs. The most frequent HLA-B alleles were B*15; B*35; B*44 and B*51. Although some differences in the allele frequencies could be observed between the two IDU groups, none of these was statistically significant. Therefore, no putative association between these genetic markers and susceptibility/resistance to HIV-1 infection could be made evident in the present study. So far, the assessment of genetic markers among the IDU population has been restricted to North American, European, and Asian studies and this report represents a pioneer descriptive study of the distribution of CCR5 genotypes and HLA-B alleles in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 08/2009; 9(4):638-42. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. A substantial decline of HIV prevalence has been observed in injection drug users (IDUs) from Rio de Janeiro, in recent years. Differential characteristics and behaviors of new (injecting for =6 y) injectors may help to understand recent changes and to implement appropriate preven-tion strategies. Methods. Between October 1999 and December 2001, 609 active/ex-IDUs were recruited from different communities, interviewed, and tested for HIV. Contingency table analysis and t-tests were used to assess differences between new and long-term injectors. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of HIV serostatus for long-term and new injectors. Results. HIV prevalence was 11.7% for 309 long-term injectors (95% CI 8.1–15.3) and 4.3% for 300 new injectors (95% CI 2.0–6.6). New injectors reported having engaged in treatment and having received syringes from needle exchange programs (NEPs) more frequently than long-term injectors in the last 6 months, but sharing behaviors remained frequent and even increased vis-à-vis long-term injectors. For male new injectors, “sexual intercourse with another man” was found to be the sole significant risk factor for HIV infection (Adj OR = 8.03; 95% CI 1.52–42.48). Among male long-term injectors, “to have ever injected with anyone infected with HIV” (Adj OR = 3.91; 95% CI 1.09–14.06) and to have “ever been in prison” (Adj OR = 2.56; 95% CI 1.05–6.24) were found to be significantly associated with HIV infection. Discussion. New injectors are seeking help in drug treatment centers or needle exchange programs. They differ from long-term injectors in terms of their risk factors for HIV infection and have lower prevalence levels for HIV. Such differences may help to understand the recent dynamics of HIV/AIDS in this population and highlight the need to reinforce new injectors’ help-seeking behavior and to reduce current unacceptably high levels of unprotected sex and syringe sharing in new injectors despite attendance of prevention/treatment programs.
    Substance Use &amp Misuse 07/2009; 40(1). · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this paper is to study how structural determinants and the role of injecting drug users (IDUs) as a bridging population to the general population affected the AIDS subepidemic in southern Brazil during 1986–2000. Data from 288 southernmost Brazilian municipalities were analyzed. Using hierarchical modeling and inputs from a Geographic Information System, a multilevel model was constructed. The dependent variable was the logged AIDS standardized incidence rate (among the heterosexual population aged 15–69-years-old); independent variables included indicators for education, water provision, sewage, and garbage collection, per capita income, Gini coefficient (on income), Human Development Index, indicators of accessibility, and AIDS rate among IDUs. Significant predictors included AIDS rate among IDUs, distance from/to highways/railways, the Human Development Index and the ratio of residents who have access to sanitary installations. Poverty (as measured by socioeconomic indicators) and bridging from IDUs contribute to the spread of HIV/AIDS in Brazilian southern municipalities.
    Health & Place 01/2009; · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the last decade, a declining prevalence of HCV infection has been described in injecting drug users (IDUs) in different countries. This study is the first to assess temporal trends in drug-injecting patterns, HCV infection rates and viral genotype distribution in 770 Brazilian IDUs, recruited by two cross-sectional studies (1994-1997 and 1999-2001). A substantial decline in the prevalence of HCV infection was found over the years (75% in 1994 vs. 20.6% in 2001, P<0.001) that may be a consequence of the significant reduction in the overall frequencies of drug injection and needle-sharing, as well as the participation of IDUs in initiatives aimed at reducing drug-related harm. No trend was found in terms of viral genotype distribution. Despite the favourable scenario, preventive measures must be maintained, especially in vulnerable subgroups such as young or new injectors, where risky behaviours through direct and indirect sharing practices remain common.
    Epidemiology and Infection 01/2009; 137(7):970-9. · 2.87 Impact Factor
  • 12/2008: pages 629-654;

Publication Stats

270 Citations
70.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Instituto Evandro Chagas
      Ananindeua, Pará, Brazil
  • 2012
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2003–2008
    • Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
      • • Laboratório de Informação em Saúde (Lis) (ICITC)
      • • Departamento de Virologia (CPqAM)
      • • Departamento de Imunologia
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2007
    • Columbia University
      New York City, New York, United States