Satyanarayana Rachagani

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, United States

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Publications (21)126.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers remain one of the most common malignancies and are the second common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The limited effectiveness of therapy for patients with advanced stage and recurrent disease is a reflection of an incomplete understanding of the molecular basis of GI carcinogenesis. Major advancements have improved our understanding of pathology and pathogenesis of GI cancers, but high mortality rates, unfavorable prognosis and lack of clinical predictive biomarkers provide an impetus to investigate new sensitive and specific diagnostic and prognostic markers for GI cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (19-24 nucleotides) noncoding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level thus playing an important role in modulating various biological processes including but not limited to developmental processes, proliferation, apoptosis, metabolism, differentiation, epithelial-mechenchymal transition and are involved in the initiation and progression of various human cancers. Unique miRNA expression profiles have been observed in various cancer types at different stages, suggesting their potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Due to their tumor-specific and tissue-specific expression profiles, stability, robust clinical assays for detection in serum as well as in formalin-fixed tissue samples, miRNAs have emerged as attractive candidates for diagnostic and prognostic applications. This review summarizes recent research supporting the utility of miRNAs as novel diagnostic and prognostic tools for GI cancers.
    Current pharmaceutical design 01/2014; · 4.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MUC4 shows aberrant expression in early pancreatic lesions and a high specificity for pancreatic cancer (PC). It thus has a high potential to be a sensitive and specific biomarker. Unfortunately, its low serum level limits its diagnostic/prognostic potential. We here report that a multi-faceted acute phase protein lipocalin 2, regulated by MUC4, could be a potential diagnostic/prognostic marker for pancreatic cancer. Experimental Designs and RESULTS: Overexpression/knockdown, luciferase reporter and molecular inhibition studies revealed that MUC4 regulates lipocalin 2 by stabilizing HER2 and stimulating AKT, which results in the activation of NF-κB. Immunohistochemical analyses of lipocalin 2 and MUC4 showed a significant positive correlation between MUC4 and lipocalin 2 in primary, metastatic tissues (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.71, p-value=0.002) from rapid autopsy tissue sample from PC patients as well as in serum and tissue samples from spontaneous KRASG12D mouse PC model (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.98, p-value <0.05). Lipocalin 2 levels increased progressively with disease advancement (344.2 ±22.8 ng/ml for 10 week to 3067.2±572.6 for 50 week; p<0.0001). In human PC cases, significantly elevated levels of lipocalin 2 were observed in PC patients (148±13.18 ng/ml) in comparison to controls (73.27±4.9 ng/ml, p-value=0.014). Analyses of pre- and post-chemotherapy patients showed higher lipocalin 2 levels in pre-chemotherapy patients (121.7 ng/ml, 95% C.I. 98.1-150.9) in comparison to the post-chemotherapy (92.6 ng/ml, 95% C.I. 76.7-111.6, p-value=0.06) group. The present study delineates the association and the downstream mechanisms of MUC4-regulated elevation of lipocalin-2 (via HER2/AKT/NF-κB) and its clinical significance for prognosis of pancreatic cancer.
    Clinical Cancer Research 11/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional gene regulators that are differentially expressed in several pathophysiological conditions including cancer. They impact the disease course by modulating an array of putative target gene(s). Interestingly, there is a strong correlation between the various miRNAs target(s) and the smoking-regulated genes in cancer. This review article provides an insight into the current status of smoking-induced miRNAs and their genetic/epigenetic regulation in smoking-associated cancers, with a major focus on lung cancer (LC). Furthermore, it discusses the role of miRNAs in smoking-mediated oncogenic events in cancer and explores the diagnostic/prognostic potential of miRNA-based biomarkers and their efficacy as therapeutic targets.
    Trends in Molecular Medicine 11/2013; · 9.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Shifts in body composition, such as accumulation of body fat, can be a symptom of many chronic human diseases; hence, efforts have been made to investigate the genetic mechanisms that underlie body composition. For example, a few quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been discovered using genome-wide association studies, which will eventually lead to the discovery of causal mutations that are associated with tissue traits. Although some body composition QTL have been identified in mice, limited research has been focused on the imprinting and interaction effects that are involved in these traits. Previously, we found that Myostatin genotype, reciprocal cross, and sex interacted with numerous chromosomal regions to affect growth traits. Here, we report on the identification of muscle, adipose, and morphometric phenotypic QTL (pQTL), translation and transcription QTL (tQTL) and expression QTL (eQTL) by applying a QTL model with additive, dominance, imprinting, and interaction effects. Using an F2 population of 1000 mice derived from the Myostatin-null C57BL/6 and M16i mouse lines, six imprinted pQTL were discovered on chromosomes 6, 9, 10, 11, and 18. We also identified two IGF1 and two Atp2a2 eQTL, which could be important trans-regulatory elements. pQTL, tQTL and eQTL that interacted with Myostatin, reciprocal cross, and sex were detected as well. Combining with the additive and dominance effect, these variants accounted for a large amount of phenotypic variation in this study. Our study indicates that both imprinting and interaction effects are important components of the genetic model of body composition traits. Furthermore, the integration of eQTL and traditional QTL mapping may help to explain more phenotypic variation than either alone, thereby uncovering more molecular details of how tissue traits are regulated.
    BMC Genetics 10/2013; 14(1):103. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inadequate efficacy, high toxicity and drug resistance associated with existing chemotherapeutic agents mandate a need for novel therapeutic strategies for highly aggressive pancreatic cancer (PC). Guggulsterone (GS) exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects against various cancer cells and has emerged as an attractive candidate for use in complementary or preventive cancer therapies. However, the knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of GS in PC is still limited and needs to be explored. We studied the effect of GS on PC cell growth, motility and invasion and elucidated the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. Treatment of Capan1 and CD18/HPAF PC cells with GS resulted in dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition and decreased colony formation. Further, GS treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as assessed by Annexin-V assay and FACS analysis. Increased apoptosis following GS treatment was accompanied with Bad dephosphorylation and its translocation to the mitochondria, increased Caspase-3 activation, decreased Cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and xIAP expression. Additionally, GS treatment decreased motility and invasion of PC cells by disrupting cytoskeletal organization, inhibiting activation of FAK and Src signaling and decreased MMP9 expression. More importantly, GS treatment decreased mucin MUC4 expression in Capan1 and CD18/HPAF cells through transcriptional regulation by inhibiting Jak/STAT pathway. In conclusion, our results support the utility of GS as a potential therapeutic agent for lethal PC.
    Cancer letters 08/2013; · 5.02 Impact Factor
  • Priya Pai, Satyanarayana Rachagani, Chandrakanth Are, Surinder K Batra
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the U.S., with a less than 6% five-year survival rate. Treatment is confounded by advanced stage of disease at presentation, frequent metastasis to distant organs at the time of diagnosis and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. In addition, the molecular pathogenesis of the disease is unclear. The extensive study of miRNAs over the past several years has revealed that miRNAs are frequently de-regulated in pancreatic cancer and contribute to the pathogenesis and aggressiveness of the disease. Several studies have tackled the practical difficulties in the application of miRNAs as viable therapeutic and diagnostic tools. Given that a single miRNA can affect a myriad of cellular processes, successful targeting of miRNAs as therapeutic agents could likely yield dramatic results. The current review attempts to summarize the advances in the field and assesses the prospects for miRNA profiling and targeting in aiding PC treatment.
    Current drug targets 07/2013; · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is an urgent need to develop alternative therapies against lethal pancreatic cancer (PC). Ocimum sanctum ("Holy Basil") has been used for thousands of years in traditional Indian medicine, but its anti-tumorigenic effect remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that extracts of O. sanctum leaves inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion, and induce apoptosis of PC cells in vitro. The expression of genes that promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of PC cells including activated ERK-1/2, FAK, and p65 (subunit of NF-κB), was downregulated in PC cells after O. sanctum treatment. Intraperitoneal injections of the aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted PC cells in vivo (p<0.05). Genes that inhibit metastasis (E-cadherin) and induce apoptosis (BAD) were significantly upregulated in tumors isolated from mice treated with O. sanctum extracts, while genes that promote survival (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and chemo/radiation resistance (AURKA, Chk1 and Survivin) were downregulated. Overall, our study suggests that leaves of O. sanctum could be a potential source of novel anticancer compounds in the future.
    Cancer letters 03/2013; · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC) mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D);Pdx1-Cre (KC) mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D);Trp53(R172H);Pdx1-Cre (KPC) mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D) mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines). The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic). The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e80580. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal malignancy primarily driven by activated Kras mutations and characterized by the deregulation of several genes including mucins. Previous studies on mucins have identified their significant role in both benign and malignant human diseases including PC progression and metastasis. However, the initiation of MUC expression during PC remains unknown because of lack of early stage tumor tissues from human PC patients. METHODS: In the present study, we have evaluated stage specific expression patterns of mucins during mouse PC progression in (KrasG12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC)) murine PC model from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS: In agreement with previous studies on human PC, we observed a progressive increase in the expression of mucins particularly Muc1, Muc4 and Muc5AC in the pancreas of KC (as early as PanIN I) mice with advancement of PanIN lesions and PDAC both at mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, mucin expression correlated with the increased expression of inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma (p < 0.0062), CXCL1 (p < 0.00014) and CXCL2 (p < 0.08) in the pancreas of KC mice, which are known to induce mucin expression. Further, we also observed progressive increase in inflammation in pancreas of KC mice from 10 to 50 weeks of age as indicated by the increase in the macrophage infiltration. Overall, this study corroborates with previous human studies that indicated the aberrant overexpression of MUC1, MUC4 and MUC5AC mucins during the progression of human PC. CONCLUSIONS: Our study reinforces the potential utility of the KC murine model for determining the functional role of mucins in PC pathogenesis by crossing KC mice with corresponding mucin knockout mice and evaluating mucin based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for lethal PC.
    Journal of Hematology & Oncology 10/2012; 5(1):68. · 4.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To study the expression and function of a novel cell-cycle regulatory protein, human ecdysoneless (Ecd), during pancreatic cancer pathogenesis.EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Immunohistochemical expression profiling of Ecd was done in nonneoplastic normal pancreatic tissues and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma lesions (from tissue microarray and Rapid Autopsy program) as well as precancerous PanIN lesions and metastatic organs. To analyze the biological significance of Ecd in pancreatic cancer progression, Ecd was stably knocked down in pancreatic cancer cell line followed by in vitro and in vivo functional assays.RESULTS: Normal pancreatic ducts showed very weak to no Ecd expression compared to significant positive expression in pancreatic cancer tissues (mean ± SE composite score: 0.3 ± 0.2 and 3.8 ± 0.2 respectively, P < 0.0001) as well as in PanIN precursor lesions with a progressive increase in Ecd expression with increasing dysplasia (PanIN-1-PanIN-3). Analysis of matched primary tumors and metastases from patients with pancreatic cancer revealed that Ecd is highly expressed in both primary pancreatic tumor and in distant metastatic sites. Furthermore, knockdown of Ecd suppressed cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in mice orthotopic tumors. Microarray study revealed that Ecd regulates expression of glucose transporter GLUT4 in pancreatic cancer cells and was subsequently shown to modulate glucose uptake, lactate production, and ATP generation by pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, knockdown of Ecd also reduced level of pAkt, key signaling molecule known to regulate aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells.CONCLUSION: Ecd is a novel tumor-promoting factor that is differentially expressed in pancreatic cancer and potentially regulates glucose metabolism within cancer cells. Clin Cancer Res; 1-11. ©2012 AACR.
    Clinical Cancer Research 09/2012; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MUC4 is a type-1 transmembrane mucin differentially expressed in multiple cancers and has previously been shown to potentiate progression and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with the MUC4-induced invasion and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. Stable silencing of MUC4 in multiple pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the downregulation of N-cadherin and its interacting partner fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) through downregulation of partly by pFAK, pMKK7, pJNK and pc-Jun pathway and partly through PI-3K/Akt pathway. The downregulation of FGFR1 in turn led to downregulation of pAkt, pERK1/2, pNF-κB, pIkBα, uPA, MMP-9, vimentin, N-cadherin, Twist, Slug and Zeb1 and upregulation of E-cadherin, Occludin, Cytokeratin-18 and Caspase-9 in MUC4 knockdown BXPC3 and Capan1 cells compared with scramble vector transfected cells. Further, downregulation of FGFR1 was associated with a significant change in morphology and reorganization of the actin-cytoskeleton, leading to a significant decrease in motility (P < 0.00001) and invasion (P < 0.0001) in vitro and decreased tumorigenicity and incidence of metastasis in vivo upon orthotopic implantation in the athymic mice. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that MUC4 promotes invasion and metastasis by FGFR1 stabilization through the N-cadherin upregulation.
    Carcinogenesis 07/2012; 33(10):1953-64. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel plant-derived product as a therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer (PC). The effects of an extract from the tropical tree Annona Muricata, commonly known as Graviola, was evaluated for cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, cancer-associated protein/gene expression, tumorigenicity, and metastatic properties of PC cells. Our experiments revealed that Graviola induced necrosis of PC cells by inhibiting cellular metabolism. The expression of molecules related to hypoxia and glycolysis in PC cells (i.e. HIF-1α, NF-κB, GLUT1, GLUT4, HKII, and LDHA) were downregulated in the presence of the extract. In vitro functional assays further confirmed the inhibition of tumorigenic properties of PC cells. Overall, the compounds that are naturally present in a Graviola extract inhibited multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, survival, and metastatic properties in PC cells. Collectively, alterations in these parameters led to a decrease in tumorigenicity and metastasis of orthotopically implanted pancreatic tumors, indicating promising characteristics of the natural product against this lethal disease.
    Cancer letters 04/2012; 323(1):29-40. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MUC16 (CA125) belongs to a family of high-molecular weight O-glycosylated proteins known as mucins. While MUC16 is well known as a biomarker in ovarian cancer, its expression pattern in pancreatic cancer (PC), the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, remains unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of MUC16 during the initiation, progression and metastasis of PC for possible implication in PC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. In this study, a microarray containing tissues from healthy and PC patients was used to investigate the differential protein expression of MUC16 in PC. MUC16 mRNA levels were also measured by RT-PCR in the normal human pancreatic, pancreatitis, and PC tissues. To investigate its expression pattern during PC metastasis, tissue samples from the primary pancreatic tumor and metastases (from the same patient) in the lymph nodes, liver, lung and omentum from Stage IV PC patients were analyzed. To determine its association in the initiation of PC, tissues from PC patients containing pre-neoplastic lesions of varying grades were stained for MUC16. Finally, MUC16 expression was analyzed in 18 human PC cell lines. MUC16 is not expressed in the normal pancreatic ducts and is strongly upregulated in PC and detected in pancreatitis tissue. It is first detected in the high-grade pre-neoplastic lesions preceding invasive adenocarcinoma, suggesting that its upregulation is a late event during the initiation of this disease. MUC16 expression appears to be stronger in metastatic lesions when compared to the primary tumor, suggesting a role in PC metastasis. We have also identified PC cell lines that express MUC16, which can be used in future studies to elucidate its functional role in PC. Altogether, our results reveal that MUC16 expression is significantly increased in PC and could play a potential role in the progression of this disease.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(10):e26839. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to validate global microarray results indicating the differential expression of 383 genes in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and to further evaluate their PC diagnostic potential. In total, 177 patients were recruited (47 healthy controls (HC), 35 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients, and 95 PC patients). PBMC expressions of six genes from our previous study (ANXA3, ARG1, CA5B, F5, SSBP2, and TBC1D8) along with four new genes (MIC1, NGAL, MUC1, and MUC16) were analyzed using multiplex Q-RT PCR. Differential expressions of 5 of the 6 genes previously identified by PBMC microarray were validated in this study. Multivariate models for PBMC gene expression were attempted to determine if any combination was diagnostically superior to CA19-9 alone. We found that addition of PBMC CA5B, F5, SSBP2, and MIC1 expression levels to CA19-9 significantly improved CA19-9's diagnostic abilities when comparing resectable PC to CP patients (p=0.023). Results of our previous study were validated, indicating reproducibility of PC-associated PBMC expression profiling. We identified a score-based model that can differentiate resectable PC from CP better than CA19-9, potentiating that PBMC differential expression analysis may offer a novel tool for early PC diagnosis.
    Cancer biomarkers: section A of Disease markers 01/2011; 11(1):1-14. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    Satyanarayana Rachagani, Ye Cheng, James M Reecy
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    ABSTRACT: Loss of functional Myostatin results in a dramatic increase in skeletal muscle mass. It is unknown what role miRNAs play in Myostatin mediated repression of skeletal muscle mass. We hypothesized that Myostatin genotype would be associated with the differential expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle. Loss of functional Myostatin resulted in a significant increase (p < .001) in miR-1, miR-133a, miR-133b, and miR-206 expression. In contrast, Myostatin genotype had no effect (P > .2) on miR-24 expression level. Myostatin genotype did not affect the expression level of MyoD or Myogenin (P > 0.5). Myostatin may regulates the expression of miRNAs such as miR-133a, miR-133b, miR-1, and miR-206 in skeletal muscle as it has been observed that the expression of those miRNAs are significantly higher in myostatin null mice compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. In contrast, expression of myogenic factors such as MyoD or Myogenin has not been affected by myostatin in the muscle tissue.
    BMC Research Notes 11/2010; 3:297.
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    ABSTRACT: The membrane-bound mucins, MUC17 (human) and Muc3 (mouse), are highly expressed on the apical surface of intestinal epithelia and are thought to be cytoprotective. The extracellular regions of these mucins contain EGF-like Cys-rich segments (CRD1 and CRD2) connected by an intervening linker domain (L). The purpose of this study was to determine the functional activity of human MUC17 membrane-bound mucin. METHODS: Endogenous MUC17 was inhibited in LS174T colon cells by stable transfection of a small hairpin RNA targeting MUC17 (LSsi cells). The effect of recombinant MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2 protein on migration, apoptosis, and experimental colitis was determined. RESULTS: Reduced MUC17 expression in LSsi cells was associated with visibly reduced cell aggregation, reduced cell-cell adherence, and reduced cell migration, but no change in tumorigenicity. LSsi cells also demonstrated a 3.7-fold increase in apoptosis rates compared with control cells following treatment with etoposide. Exposure of colonic cell lines to exogenous recombinant MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2 protein significantly increased cell migration and inhibited apoptosis. As a marker of biologic activity, MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2 proteins stimulate ERK phosphorylation in colonic cell lines; and inhibition of ERK phosphorylation reduced the anti-apoptosis and migratory effect of MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2. Finally, mice treated with MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2 protein given per rectum demonstrated accelerated healing in acetic acid and dextran sodium sulfate induced colitis in vivo. These data indicate that both native MUC17 and the exogenous recombinant cysteine-rich domain of MUC17 play a role in diverse cellular mechanisms related to cell restitution, and suggest a potential role for MUC17-CRD1-L-CRD2 recombinant protein in the treatment of mucosal inflammatory diseases.
    The international journal of biochemistry & cell biology 03/2010; 42(6):996-1006. · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    Satyanarayana Rachagani, Sushil Kumar, Surinder K Batra
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNA molecules of 17-25 nucleotides (nt) in length, predicted to control the activity of about 30% of all protein-coding genes in mammals. Altered expressions of miRNAs are reported in various cancers and may associate with cancer pathogenesis, apoptosis, and cell growth, thereby functioning as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. Recent reports showed that deregulation of miRNA contribute to tumor development and progression and hence, have diagnostic and prognostic value in several human malignancies. This review discusses the current status of miRNA in pancreatic cancer development, progression, diagnosis, and therapy.
    Cancer letters 12/2009; 292(1):8-16. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    Satyanarayana Rachagani, Maria P Torres, Nicolas Moniaux, Surinder K Batra
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    ABSTRACT: Mucins are the most abundant high molecular weight glycoproteins in mucus. Their nature and glycosylation content dictates the biochemical and biophysical properties of viscoelastic secretions, pointing out an important role in diverse biological functions, such as differentiation, cell adhesions, immune responses, and cell signaling. Mucins are expressed in tubular organs by specialized epithelial cells in the body. Their aberrant expression is well documented in a variety of inflammatory or malignant diseases. From a prognosis point of view, their expression and alterations in glycosylation are associated with the development and progression of malignant diseases. Therefore, mucins can be used as valuable markers to distinguish between normal and disease conditions. Indeed, this alteration in glycosylation patterns generates several epitopes in the oligosaccharide side chains that can be used as diagnostic and/or prognostic markers. Furthermore, these characteristic tumor-associated epitopes are extensively used as appropriate immunotargets of malignant epithelial cells. Therefore, in an effort to detect and treat cancer at the earliest stage possible, mucins are analyzed as potential markers of disease for diagnosis, progression, and for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we focused on the current status of the distribution of mucins in normal and pathologic conditions and their clinical use both in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics treatments.
    BioFactors 11/2009; 35(6):509-27. · 3.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand the biology and evolution of ruminants, the cattle genome was sequenced to about sevenfold coverage. The cattle genome contains a minimum of 22,000 genes, with a core set of 14,345 orthologs shared among seven mammalian species of which 1217 are absent or undetected in noneutherian (marsupial or monotreme) genomes. Cattle-specific evolutionary breakpoint regions in chromosomes have a higher density of segmental duplications, enrichment of repetitive elements, and species-specific variations in genes associated with lactation and immune responsiveness. Genes involved in metabolism are generally highly conserved, although five metabolic genes are deleted or extensively diverged from their human orthologs. The cattle genome sequence thus provides a resource for understanding mammalian evolution and accelerating livestock genetic improvement for milk and meat production.
    Science 05/2009; 324(5926):522-8. · 31.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

450 Citations
126.59 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • University of Nebraska Medical Center
      • Department of Pathology and Microbiology
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2012
    • The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Omaha, Nebraska, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • University of Nebraska at Omaha
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      • • Department of Pathology and Microbiology
      Omaha, NE, United States
  • 2010
    • Iowa State University
      • Department of Animal Science
      Ames, IA, United States