A Salvatierra

Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain

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Publications (46)94.28 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Extended donors (EDs) are safely used to increase the donor pool in lung transplantation (LT), but their influence in critically ill patients (extended recipients [ERs]) remains controversial. We compared LT outcomes matching optimal donors (ODs) or EDs with optimal recipients (ORs) or ERs. Three hundred and sixty-five LTs were reviewed. ED criteria: age >55, PaO2/FiO2 < 350 mmHg, pulmonary infiltrates/purulent secretions and ischaemic times >6 h (single LT [SLT]) and >9 h (double LT [DLT]). ER criteria: pulmonary fibrosis or pulmonary hypertension, pretransplant intubation, age >60 years and bypass >2 h. Four groups were created: Group 1 (OD/OR), Group 2 (OD/ER), Group 3 (ED/OR) and Group 4 (ED/ER). Thirty-day mortality, primary graft dysfunction (PGD), onset of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), long-term survival and other transplant outcomes were compared between OD and ED, OR and ER and among the four groups of study. There were 151 SLTs and 214 DLTs. Donors: OD (n = 229) vs ED (n = 136); PGD 8 vs 10% (P = 0.43); 30-day mortality 19 vs 20% (P = 0.53) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 67, 47, 34, 26 vs 69, 53, 46 and 29% (P = 0.33). Recipients: OR (n = 182) vs ER (n = 183); PGD 7 vs 10% (P = 0.10); 30-day mortality 15 vs 23% (P = 0.04) and survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years): 73, 57, 46, 30 vs 61, 42, 29 and 23% (P = 0.002). Four donor/recipient (D/R) groups: Group 1 (n = 122), Group 2 (n = 106), Group 3 (n = 61), Group 4 (n = 76); PGD 10, 6, 3 and 16% (P = 0.05); 30-day mortality 13, 26, 19 and 20%, respectively (P = 0.13); survival (1, 5, 10 and 15 years) 74, 55, 44 and 35% (Group 1), 55, 39, 22 and 16% (Group 2), 70, 59, 48 and 26% (Group 3) and 68, 47, 37 and 22% (Group 4) (P = 0.004). No differences in the onset of BOS were observed among the four study groups. LT in critically ill recipients is associated with poor early and long-term outcomes, irrespective of the quality of the donor and length of ischaemic times.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 10/2013; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Local botulinum toxin injections and endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) have shown clinical effectiveness for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis in several studies. Although both strategies cause considerable costs for health-care systems, at the moment there are no studies examining directly their cost-effectiveness performance. The aim of the study was to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness of botulinum toxin when compared with ETS for palmar hyperhidrosis. Costs, effectiveness, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated. Costs were assessed from a Spanish National Health System perspective in a historical cohort of patients with palmar hyperhidrosis attending a tertiary referral hospital. Effectiveness was evaluated by using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). A responder was defined as a patient who reported at least a two-grade improvement on the HDSS scale with respect to the baseline value. The horizon of time was 1 year. Effectiveness was greater for ETS (n = 128) when compared with botulinum toxin (n = 100) for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis (92% vs. 68%; odds ratio (OR) = 6.22 [2.80, 13.80]; absolute risk ratio (ARR) = -0.24 [-0.45, -0.14]; number-needed-to-treat (NNT) = -4 [-2, -11]). Botulinum toxin had an ICER of 125 € when compared with ETS during the first year of treatment. In this retrospective real-world observational sample of patients with palmar hyperhidrosis, treatment with ETS appears to be more effective and less costly when compared with botulinum toxin during the first year of treatment. Analyses such as this give decision makers the tools to choose a better treatment option which is both highly effective and yet has a low cost.
    Dermatology and therapy. 06/2013; 3(1):63-72.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To determine whether lung retrieval from traumatic donors performed within 24 h of brain death has a negative impact on early graft function and survival after lung transplantation (LT), when compared with those retrieved after 24 h. METHODS: Review of lung transplants performed from traumatic donors over a 17-year period. Recipients were distributed into two groups: transplants from traumatic donor lungs retrieved within 24 h of brain death (Group A), and transplants from traumatic donor lungs retrieved after 24 h of brain death (Group B). Demographic data of donors and recipients, early graft function, perioperative complications and mortality were compared between both groups. RESULTS: Among 356 lung transplants performed at our institution, 132 were from traumatic donors (70% male, 30% female). Group A: 73 (55%); Group B: 59 (45%). There were 53 single, 77 double, and 2 combined LT. Indications were emphysema in 41 (31%), pulmonary fibrosis in 31 (23%), cystic fibrosis in 38 (29%), bronchiectasis in 9 (7%) and other indications in 13 patients (10%). Donor and recipient demographic data, need or cardiopulmonary bypass, postoperative complications and Intensive Care Unit and hospital stay did not differ between groups. Primary graft dysfunction (A vs B): 9 (16%) vs 13 (26%) P = 0.17. PaO(2)/FiO(2) 24 h post-transplant (A vs B): 303 mmHg vs 288 mmHg (P = 0.57). Number of acute rejection episodes (A vs B): 0.93 vs 1.49 (P = 0.01). Postoperative intubation time (A vs B): 99 vs 100 h (P = 0.99). 30-day mortality (A vs B): 7 (10%) vs 2 (3.5%) (P = 0.13). Freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (A vs B): 82, 72, 37, 22 vs 78, 68, 42, 15%, at 3, 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively (P = 0.889). Survival (A vs B): 65, 54, 46, 42 and 27 vs 60, 50, 45, 43 and 29% at 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years, respectively (P = 0.937). CONCLUSIONS: In our experience, early lung retrieval after brain death from traumatic donors does not adversely affect early and long-term outcomes after LT.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 02/2013; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spanish Lung Transplant Registry (SLTR) began its activities in 2006 with the participation of all the lung transplantation (LT) groups with active programs in Spain. This report presents for the first time an overall description and results of the patients who received lung transplants in Spain from 2006 to 2010. LT activity has grown progressively, and in this time period 951 adults and 31 children underwent lung transplantation. The mean age of the recipients was 48.2, while the mean age among the lung donors was 41.7. In adult LT, the most frequent cause for lung transplantation was emphysema/COPD, followed by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, both representing more than 60% the total number of indications. The probability for survival after adult LT to one and three years was 72% and 60%, respectively, although in patients who survived until the third month post-transplantation, these survival rates reached 89.7% and 75.2%. The factors that most clearly influenced patient survival were the age of the recipient and the diagnosis that indicated the transplantation. Among the pediatric transplantations, cystic fibrosis was the main cause for transplantation (68%), with a one-year survival of 80% and a three-year survival of 70%. In adult as well as pediatric transplantations, the most frequent cause of death was infection.These data confirm the consolidated situation of LT in Spain as a therapeutic option for advanced chronic respiratory disease, both in children as well as in adults.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología. 02/2013; 49(2):70–78.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES In current practice, donors and recipients are not matched for gender in lung transplantation. However, some data have suggested a possible effect of gender combinations on lung transplant outcomes. We examined whether donor-recipient (D/R) gender mismatch is related to adverse outcomes after lung transplantation in terms of early and long-term graft function and survival.METHODS We reviewed 256 donors and lung transplant recipients over a 14-year period. Patients were distributed into four groups: Group A (D/R: female/female), Group B (D/R: male/male), Group C (D/R: female/male), Group D (D/R: male/female). Donor and recipient variables were compared among groups, including early graft function, 30-day mortality, freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and long-term survival.RESULTSGroup A: 57 (22%), Group B: 99 (39%), Group C: 62 (24%), Group D: 38 (15%) transplants (P = 0.001). Donor age was 29 ± 14, 27 ± 12, 33 ± 13 and 23 ± 12 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.004). Recipient age was 31 ± 15, 44 ± 17, 42 ± 16 and 30 ± 16 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.000). PaO(2)/FiO(2) (mmHg) 24 h post-transplant was: Group A: 276 ± 144, Group B: 297 ± 131, Group C: 344 ± 133 and Group D: 238 ± 138 (P = 0.015). Primary graft dysfunction developed in 23, 14, 17 and 21% of recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.45). Operative mortality was 4.4, 6.5, 5.2 and 2%, for recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.66). Freedom from BOS was 73, 59 and 36% for gender-matched transplants vs 76, 67 and 40% for gender-mismatched transplants at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively (P = 0.618), without differences among groups. A non-significant survival benefit was observed for female recipients, irrespective of the donor gender.CONCLUSIONS Donor-recipient gender mismatch does not have a negative impact on early graft function and mortality following lung transplantation. There is a trend towards a survival benefit for female recipients, irrespective of the donor gender.
    Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery 01/2013; · 1.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS) has become a palliative treatment for patients with advanced emphysema and disabling dyspnea. After single lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, LVRS may be indicated to improve graft dysfunction caused by native lung hyperinflation compressing the grafted lung. This common complication is the subject of our study, which showed LVRS to be helpful to manage this situation. We performed an observational retrospective and descriptive study using the data of 293 patients transplanted in our center between January 1996 and October 2011. Some of the patients who underwent a single lung transplantation developed native lung hyperinflation years after the transplantation, interfering with respiratory function due to graft compression.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2012; 44(7):2115-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to describe the incidence of lung cancer in patients after lung transplantation (LT). We performed an observational, retrospective, descriptive study based on data from 340 patients undergoing lung transplantation between October 1993 and December 2010. We collected data about the donors, recipients, intra- and postoperative periods, and survivals. We identified 9 (2.6%) patients who developed lung cancer after LT. Their average age was 56 ± 9.3 years (range, 18-63). All cases were men with 8/9 (88.8%) having received a single lung transplant. All cancers developed in the native lung. The indications for transplantation were: emphysema type chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n = 5), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 3), or cystic fibrosis (n = 1); 77% of them were former smokers. All of the COPD patient were affected. The interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 53.3 ± 12 months (range 24-86). Survival after cancer diagnosis was 49.3 ± 6.3 (range = 0-180) months. LT was associated with a relatively high incidence of lung cancer, particularly in the native lung. In our series, lung cancer was related more to patients with emphysema-type COPD and a history of smoking. We believe that these patients should be closely followed to establish the diagnosis and apply early treatment.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2012; 44(7):2118-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spanish Lung Transplant Registry (SLTR) began its activities in 2006 with the participation of all the lung transplantation (LT) groups with active programs in Spain. This report presents for the first time an overall description and results of the patients who received lung transplants in Spain from 2006 to 2010. LT activity has grown progressively, and in this time period 951 adults and 31 children underwent lung transplantation. The mean age of the recipients was 48.2, while the mean age among the lung donors was 41.7. In adult LT, the most frequent cause for lung transplantation was emphysema/COPD, followed by idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, both representing more than 60% the total number of indications. The probability for survival after adult LT to one and three years was 72% and 60%, respectively, although in patients who survived until the third month post-transplantation, these survival rates reached 89.7% and 75.2%. The factors that most clearly influenced patient survival were the age of the recipient and the diagnosis that indicated the transplantation. Among the pediatric transplantations, cystic fibrosis was the main cause for transplantation (68%), with a one-year survival of 80% and a three-year survival of 70%. In adult as well as pediatric transplantations, the most frequent cause of death was infection. These data confirm the consolidated situation of LT in Spain as a therapeutic option for advanced chronic respiratory disease, both in children as well as in adults.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 08/2012; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background  Moderate to severe palmar hyperhidrosis can disturb people's work and social and emotional lives. Botulinum toxin and sympathectomy are currently considered the most effective treatment options but few studies have analysed the concordance between efficacy and patient satisfaction in comparisons of these two types of treatments. Objective  To assess the relation between efficacy and the satisfaction of patients with palmar hyperhidrosis treated with either botulinum toxin or endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. Material and methods  This retrospective, observational study included all patients treated with either botulinum toxin or endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in a single reference hospital in 2005-2010. Information was obtained from computerized medical records and a telephone survey about patients' educational and socio-economic level, awareness of treatment options, pre- and post-treatment severity of palmar hyperhidrosis, satisfaction and associated side effects. Predictors of efficacy and patient satisfaction with each treatment were analysed with ordinal and multinomial logistic regression models. Results  Patients who underwent sympathectomy had more severe palmar hyperhidrosis but efficacy and patient satisfaction were greater compared with patients given botulinum toxin. The severity of the compensatory palmar hyperhidrosis was predictive of less satisfaction after sympathectomy. In the group treated with botulinum toxin, low socio-economic status, lack of information about treatment options, fewer sessions and a shorter anhidrotic effect were associated with less satisfaction. Conclusion  In studies of expectations regarding the outcome of palmar hyperhidrosis treatment, doctors should consider the factors that determine patient satisfaction in relation to the treatment options.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 07/2012; · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present guidelines have been prepared with the consensus of at least one representative of each of the hospitals with lung transplantation programs in Spain. In addition, prior to their publication, these guidelines have been reviewed by a group of prominent reviewers who are recognized for their professional experience in the field of lung transplantation. Within the following pages, the reader will find the selection criteria for lung transplantation candidates, when and how to remit a patient to a transplantation center and, lastly, when to add the patient to the waiting list. A level of evidence has been identified for the most relevant questions. Our intention is for this document to be a practical guide for pulmonologists who do not directly participate in lung transplantations but who should consider this treatment for their patients. Finally, these guidelines also propose an information form in order to compile in an organized manner the patient data of the potential candidate for lung transplantation, which are relevant in order to be able to make the best decisions possible.
    Archivos de Bronconeumología 06/2011; 47(6):303-9. · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The number of patients awaiting lung transplantation has steadily increased over the past decade, but the number of donors has remained relatively stable. Owing to the increasing scarcity of donor lungs, especially for pediatric and small adult recipients, advanced operative strategies for the use of larger grafts for smaller recipients have been developed. Size matching between donors and recipients represents one of the organ distribution criteria widely accepted by lung transplantation teams. However, in some cases it is not possible to allocate a donor to the corresponding size-compatible recipient. To avoid possible complications derived from the implantation of oversized lungs into smaller recipients, various methods of downsizing are applied for cadaveric donor lungs, such as lobar transplantation. We review our experience in 6 patients undergoing volume reduction of the lung graft by lobar resection at the time of transplantation. Graft volume reduction by anatomic resection (lobar transplantation) is a reliable and safe procedure to overcome size disparities between the donor and the recipient of a lung transplant, and thus to maximize the number of donors.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2010; 42(8):3214-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation (OLT) remains the only available therapy for patients with end-stage idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The objective of this study was to review our experience of OLT for end-stage IPF (IPFLT) patients, seeking to identify variables associated with survival for comparison with outcomes of other indications for LT (OILT). From October 1993 to December 2009, we performed 310 consecutive OLT in 301 patients for treatment of various end-stage pulmonary conditions. The indications for OLT were: IPF (n=89, 30.5%) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=82), cystic fibrosis (n=80), bronchiectasis (n=12), alfa-1-antitrypsin deficit (n=6), primary pulmonary hypertension (n=4), bronchiolitis obliterans (n=4), other conditions (n=15). We observed significant differences in the actuarial survival between the IPFLT and the OILT groups particularly at the expense of worse perioperative 30-day and early 1-year mortality in the IPFLT group. Upon univariate and multivariate analyses, the need for cardiopulmonary bypass, previous recipient ventilator dependence, and donor age>50 years were all associated with poorer survival rates among IPF patients. In our experience, survival did not differ between patients who underwent a single versus a bilateral sequential lung transplant (BSLT); however, BSLT cases were associated with short-term damage but long-term survival. The functional results in the IPFLT group were excellent. We observed significant improvements in the values of arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), arterial carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO2), forced vital capacity (FVC%) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) at 6, 12, and 36 months compared to their pretransplant baseline results.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2010; 42(8):3211-3. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to assess the suitability rates and the causes of lung-donor refusal, to determine which factors could be improved to expand the donor pool available for transplantation (LTx). Lung donors offered to our Lung Transplantation Unit from October 1993 to December 2007 were reviewed to assess the causes of unsuitability. The donor-lung evaluation was divided into three stages: stage 1 (PaO(2)/FiO(2) ratio, chest X-ray, bronchoscopic findings), stage 2 (donor-lung inspection and palpation) and stage 3 (assessment of grafts after harvesting). Variables from donors and recipients were analysed and compared between 1993-2001 (group A) and 2002-2007 (group B). An additional subgroup of extended donors was analysed to assess the recipient outcomes. A total of 476 lung donors were assessed (278 men and 198 women; mean age 29+/-13 years). Causes of death were trauma in 255, intracranial bleeding in 202 and others in 19. As many as 273 donors were suitable for LTx (57%; 162 double LTx and 111 single LTx). Acceptability rates were 68%, 58% and 57% at stages 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and were significantly higher in group B than in group A (overall: 64% vs 54%; stage 2: 91% vs 79%), with no changes in stages 1 and 3. Abnormal bronchoscopy precluded LTx in 79 cases (16%). Group B donors were older (p=0.000), ventilated longer (p=0.07) and with shorter ischaemic times (p=0.000) than group A. In the recipients, primary graft dysfunction (PGD) (17% vs 15%) and 30-day mortality (11% vs 6%) did not differ between both the groups. No differences were observed between extended and ideal donors in terms of recipient 30-day mortality (extended 6% vs ideal 9%; p=0.315) and development of PGD (extended 21% vs ideal 15%; p=0.342). Despite the high rate of organ donation in Spain, the acceptability rate remains low (57%), mainly due to failure to meet the criteria for acceptance at the early stages of donor-lung assessment. Improvements in multi-organ donor care must be made to expand the lung-donor pool. The use of extended donors does not seem to have a negative impact on recipient outcomes.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 09/2009; 37(2):432-9. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bronchial and vascular reconstructive procedures are a technically feasible alternative to pneumonectomy in lung cancer and have the advantage of preserving lung parenchyma function. Sleeve resection and prosthetic reconstruction of the pulmonary artery (PA) have progressively gained acceptance as an alternative to pneumonectomy in lung cancer surgery. To spare the lung parenchyma, angioplastic procedures involving removal of a portion of the arterial wall or a circumferential resection with arterial reconstruction have been used. Several techniques of pulmonary arterioplasty have been documented, such as patch reconstruction, end-to-end anastomosis, synthetic prosthesis, biological prosthesis, prosthetic or pericardial conduit. We present the first case reported in the literature of PA reconstruction with a pulmonary vein graft.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 07/2009; 36(2):422-3. · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • Cirugía Española 07/2009; 87(1):55-6. · 0.87 Impact Factor
  • Cirugía Española 04/2009; 85(4):254-6. · 0.87 Impact Factor
  • Cirugia Espanola - CIR ESPAN. 01/2009; 85(4):254-256.
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    ABSTRACT: The shortage of suitable donors for lung transplantation (LT) has led to liberalization of criteria for donor selection. This study evaluated the outcomes of LT among a subset of patients receiving organs from standard donors older than 40 years of age. We distributed patients who underwent LTs performed between 1993 and 2007 into 2 groups: Group A, donors younger than 40 years; and Group B, donors 40 years of age or older. We compared donor and recipient preoperative, operative, and recipient postoperative factors by univariate analyses. We reviewed 255 consecutive LT patients: Group A, 198 patients (78%); and Group B, 57 patients (22%). Donors from Group A showed longer intubation times (43 hours vs 34 hours; P = .026) and a better PaO2/FiO2 ratio (477 vs 454 mm Hg; P = .020), with no differences in other donor variables. Among patients dying of primary graft failure, 20% were from Group B versus 5.6% from Group A (P = .04). There were no differences in mortality or other postoperative variables. Survival rates did not differ between groups (70%, 62%, 52%, and 45% in Group A vs 60%, 45%, 45%, and 20% in Group B at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years, respectively; P = .13). The use of ideal donors older than 40 years of age might be related to a higher incidence of primary graft failure. However, long-term survival is similar to that of recipients from younger donors.
    Transplantation Proceedings 12/2008; 40(9):3079-81. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation (LT) is the only available option for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with end-stage lung disease. We reviewed our experience with LT in patients with end-stage CF (CFLT) to identify variables associated with survival and to compare the results with other indications for LT (OILT). Between October 1993 and October 2007, we performed 259 consecutive LTs in 250 patients for treatment of various end-stage pulmonary conditions. The indications for LT were CF in 78 patients idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in 76, COPD in 64, bronchiectasis in 11, alfa-1-antitrypsin deficit in 5, primary pulmonary hypertension in 4, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome in 4, and other indications in 11. Our study group comprised 78 patients with CF (30.11%) (CFLT). We observed significant differences in the actuarial survival between the CFLT and OILT groups. Perioperative mortality and the incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome were comparable in both groups. We found that in patients with CF, LT performed under urgency code (mechanical ventilation) showed no significant difference from LT performed electively insofar as long-term survival, early death, or perioperative death. The functional results in the CFLT group were excellent. We observed significant improvement in PaO(2), PaCO(2), forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration at 6, 12, and 36 months compared with the pretransplantation baseline values.
    Transplantation Proceedings 12/2008; 40(9):3085-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung transplantation (LT) under urgency-code mechanical ventilation (UCMV) has been identified in the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) Registry as a negative prognostic factor increasing the likelihood of mortality. The objective of this study was to review our experience of UCLT for with cystic fibrosis (CF) patients compared with elective LT (ELT). From October 1993 to October 2007, we performed 259 consecutive LTs in 250 patients, of whom 78 (31.20%) had CF. Our study group comprised CF patients who received UCLT (n = 23). The type of LT in the UCLT group was as follows: bipulmonary (18), left unipulmonary (2), and bilobar transplantation from cadavers (3). The UCLT group more often required cardiopulmonary bypass (CB) (P = .025), pulmonary tailoring (P = .030), and longer periods of pulmonary ischemia (P = .066) than the ELT group. We noticed a greater number of cases of pneumonia during the first postoperative month in the UCLT group. However, incidence of surgical complications, early and perioperative mortality, and episodes of acute and chronic rejection (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome) did not differ between the groups. Survival rates at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years were 73.66%, 63.74%, 42.49%, and 42.49%, respectively, in the UCLT group (mean, 1927 [SE = 366] days) and 75.95%, 71.32%, 63.37%, and 63.37% in the ELT group (mean, 2946 [SE = 281] days; P = .3417). In our experience, UCLT in patients with CF is fully justified. Careful selection of such cases permits acceptable long-term survival rates to be achieved with no increase in early or perioperative mortality.
    Transplantation Proceedings 12/2008; 40(9):3067-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor