F R Miller

Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan, United States

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Publications (113)538.31 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: CARP-1/CCAR1, a perinuclear phosphoprotein, is a regulator of cell growth and apoptosis signaling. Although CARP-1 is a regulator of chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis, it is also a part of the NF-κB proteome and a co-activator of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors as well as β-catenin signaling. Our yeast two-hybrid screen revealed CARP-1 binding with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome E3 ubiquitin ligase component APC-2 protein. CARP-1 also binds with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome co-activators Cdc20 and Cdh1. Following mapping of the minimal epitopes involved in CARP-1 binding with APC-2, a fluorescence polarization assay was established that indicated a dissociation constant (Kd) of 480 nm for CARP-1/APC-2 binding. Fluorescence polarization assay-based high throughput screening of a chemical library yielded several small molecule antagonists of CARP-1/APC-2 binding, termed CARP-1 functional mimetics. CFM-4 (1(2-chlorobenzyl)-5′-phenyl-3′H-spiro[indoline-3,2′-[1,3,4]thiadiazol]-2-one), a lead compound, binds with and stimulates CARP-1 expression. CFM-4 prevents CARP-1 binding with APC-2, causes G2M cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis with an IC50 range of 10–15 μm. Apoptosis signaling by CFM-4 involves activation of caspase-8 and -9 and caspase-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-independent loss of cyclin B1 and Cdc20 proteins. Depletion of CARP-1, however, interferes with CFM-4-dependent cell growth inhibition, activation of caspases, and apoptosis. Because CFM-4 also suppresses growth of drug-resistant human breast cancer cells without affecting the growth of human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, elevating CARP-1 by CFM-4 and consequent apoptosis could in principle be exploited to further elucidate, and perhaps effectively target, often deregulated cell cycle pathways in pathological conditions, including cancer.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 11/2011; 286(44):38000-38017. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CARP-1/CCAR1, a perinuclear phosphoprotein, is a regulator of cell growth and apoptosis signaling. Although CARP-1 is a regulator of chemotherapy-dependent apoptosis, it is also a part of the NF-κB proteome and a co-activator of steroid/thyroid nuclear receptors as well as β-catenin signaling. Our yeast two-hybrid screen revealed CARP-1 binding with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome E3 ubiquitin ligase component APC-2 protein. CARP-1 also binds with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome co-activators Cdc20 and Cdh1. Following mapping of the minimal epitopes involved in CARP-1 binding with APC-2, a fluorescence polarization assay was established that indicated a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 480 nm for CARP-1/APC-2 binding. Fluorescence polarization assay-based high throughput screening of a chemical library yielded several small molecule antagonists of CARP-1/APC-2 binding, termed CARP-1 functional mimetics. CFM-4 (1(2-chlorobenzyl)-5'-phenyl-3'H-spiro[indoline-3,2'-[1,3,4]thiadiazol]-2-one), a lead compound, binds with and stimulates CARP-1 expression. CFM-4 prevents CARP-1 binding with APC-2, causes G(2)M cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis with an IC(50) range of 10-15 μm. Apoptosis signaling by CFM-4 involves activation of caspase-8 and -9 and caspase-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway-independent loss of cyclin B1 and Cdc20 proteins. Depletion of CARP-1, however, interferes with CFM-4-dependent cell growth inhibition, activation of caspases, and apoptosis. Because CFM-4 also suppresses growth of drug-resistant human breast cancer cells without affecting the growth of human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, elevating CARP-1 by CFM-4 and consequent apoptosis could in principle be exploited to further elucidate, and perhaps effectively target, often deregulated cell cycle pathways in pathological conditions, including cancer.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 09/2011; 286(44):38000-17. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we have showed that GCNT2, a gene-encoding glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 2, I-branching enzyme, is overexpressed in highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines of human and mouse origin and basal-like breast tumor samples. GCNT2 expression is also significantly correlated to the metastatic phenotype in breast tumor samples. Functional studies showed that ectopic expression of GCNT2 enhances cell detachment, adhesion to endothelial cells, cell migration and invasion in vitro, and lung metastasis of breast cancer cells in vivo. Knockdown of GCNT2 expression decreases cell migration and invasion in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo. We have further shown the involvement of GCNT2 in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Specifically, the expression of E-cadherin is significantly changed upon GCNT2 expression at the protein level but not at the RNA level. Moreover, we have shown that GCNT2 is a direct target of the TGF-β-smad pathway and that change in GCNT2 expression modulates EMT induced by TGF-β1 treatment. Finally, we have shown that diminution of the glycosyltransferase activity of I-branching β-1, 6-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase 2 (GCNT2) abrogates its cell migration and invasion-promoting function and synergistic effect with TGF-β to induce EMT. Our study for the first time showed that GCNT2 is a novel gene contributing to breast cancer metastasis with preferential expression in basal-like breast cancer. Moreover, we discovered that involvement of GCNT2 in EMT and TGF-β signaling, and further glycosylation modification of E-cadherin by GCNT2, are the underlying integrative mechanisms for breast cancer metastasis, implying that blocking TGF-β/GCNT2 signaling is a promising approach for targeting metastatic breast cancer.
    Cancer Research 07/2011; 71(14):4846-56. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: p38γ MAPK, one of the four members of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), has previously been shown to harbor oncogenic functions. However, the biologic function of p38γ MAPK in breast cancer has not been well defined. In this study, we have shown that p38γ MAPK is overexpressed in highly metastatic human and mouse breast cancer cell lines and p38γ MAPK expression is preferentially associated with basal-like and metastatic phenotypes of breast tumor samples. Ectopic expression of p38γ MAPK did not lead to an increase in oncogenic properties in vitro in most tested mammary epithelial cells. However, knockdown of p38γ MAPK expression resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, invasion in vitro and significant retardation of tumorigenesis, and long-distance metastasis to the lungs in vivo. Moreover, knockdown of p38γ MAPK triggered the activation of AKT signaling. Inhibition of this feedback loop with various PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitors facilitated the effect of targeting p38γ MAPK. We further found that overexpression of p38γ MAPK did not promote cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and paclitaxel but significantly increased cell resistance to PJ-34, a DNA damage agent poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP) inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we identified that p38γ MAPK overexpression led to marked cell cycle arrest in G(2)/M phase. Our study for the first time clearly demonstrates that p38γ MAPK is a promising target for the design of targeted therapies for basal-like breast cancer with metastatic characteristics and for overcoming potential resistance against the PARP inhibitor.
    Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.) 05/2011; 13(5):472-82. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotes cancer invasion and metastasis, but the integrative mechanisms that coordinate these processes are incompletely understood. In this study, we used a cross-species expression profiling strategy in metastatic cell lines of human and mouse origin to identify 22 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated genes that are part of an essential genetic program in metastasis. In particular, we identified a novel function in metastasis that was not previously known for the transcription factor Forkhead Box Q1 (Foxq1). Ectopic expression of Foxq1 increased cell migration and invasion in vitro, enhanced the lung metastatic capabilities of mammary epithelial cells in vivo, and triggered a marked EMT. In contrast, Foxq1 knockdown elicited converse effects on these phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Neither ectopic expression nor knockdown of Foxq1 significantly affected cell proliferation or colony formation in vitro. Notably, Foxq1 repressed expression of the core EMT regulator E-cadherin by binding to the E-box in its promoter region. Further mechanistic investigation revealed that Foxq1 expression is regulated by TGF-β1, and that Foxq1 knockdown blocked TGF-β1-induced EMT at both morphological and molecular levels. Our findings highlight the feasibility of cross-species expression profiling as a strategy to identify metastasis-related genes, and they reveal that EMT induction is a likely mechanism underlying a novel metastasis-promoting function of Foxq1 defined here in breast cancer.
    Cancer Research 02/2011; 71(4):1292-301. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sphingolipids are lipid messengers involved in the regulation of many different cellular processes. Sphingolipid enzymes and bioactive metabolites have been targets of in vitro and in vivo efforts to suppress cancer growth, progression and metastasis of various cancer types. Dietary sphingomyelin effectively suppressed colon cancer in several rodent models without causing toxic side effects. In the present study, we determined if the effect of sphingolipid metabolites derived from the hydrolysis of dietary sphingomyelin is restricted to the intestinal tract or if their systemic concentrations are sufficient to suppress cancers of distant sites. For these studies, we used MCF10AT1 cells, a model for progressive breast cancer, injected into the mammary fatpad of nude mice as a single cell suspension. The mice were fed 0.1% sphingomyelin supplements in a semi-purified AIN76A control diet when the lesions were palpable. The study was terminated when the first lesions had grown to 5 mm. In the sphingomyelin-fed group, there was a trend to smaller lesion size and, importantly, a delayed progression to more malignant stages without apparent side effects. This may be the result of significantly reduced rates of proliferation and angiogenesis, while no increase of apoptosis was detected. Changes in aberrantly expressed proteins in the sphingomyelin-fed group, such as E-cadherin, VEGF and sphingosine kinase-1, may be associated with the suppression of tumor growth. These results demonstrate that diet-derived sphingolipids can efficiently suppress the growth and progression of MCF10AT1 xenografts, suggesting that dietary sphingomyelin may also be effective against cancers of other sites.
    Food & function. 01/2010; 1(1):90-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The heterogeneous nature of breast cancer and the correlation of myeloid cell infiltration with accelerated tumor progression were recognized early in breast cancer immunology research using murine model systems induced by the mouse mammary tumor virus, chemical carcinogens or hormones. Distinct cell lines established from a single mammary tumor attest to the challenges of controlling tumors with such complexity. Here, we test the feasibility of controlling breast cancer by active vaccination targeting a shared tumor-associated antigen, human ErB-2 (Her-2). Her-2 DNA vaccines were constructed and Her-2 transgenic mice were established. DNA vaccination overcomes Her-2 tolerance to induce anti-tumor immunity which is amplified by the removal of regulatory T cells, but is accompanied by a significant risk of autoimmunity. Her-2 vaccines combined with appropriate immune modulation to trigger in vivo priming to other tumor-associated antigens will be the key to improved breast cancer control.
    Breast disease 10/2009; 20:43-51.
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    ABSTRACT: TaqMan Gene Expression assays were used to profile the mRNA expression of estrogen receptor (ERalpha and ERbeta) and estrogen metabolism enzymes including cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULT1E1, SULT1A1, SULT2A1, and SULT2B1), steroid sulfatase (STS), aromatase (CYP19), 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17betaHSD1 and 2), CYP1B1, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in an MCF10A-derived lineage cell culture model for basal-like human breast cancer progression and in ERalpha-positive luminal MCF7 breast cancer cells. Low levels of ERalpha and ERbeta mRNA were present in MCF10A-derived cell lines. SULT1E1 mRNA was more abundant in confluent relative to subconfluent MCF10A cells, a non-tumorigenic proliferative breast disease cell line. SULT1E1 was also expressed in preneoplastic MCF10AT1 and MCF10AT1K.cl2 cells, but was markedly repressed in neoplastic MCF10A-derived cell lines as well as in MCF7 cells. Steroid-metabolizing enzymes SULT1A1 and SULT2B1 were only expressed in MCF7 cells. STS and COMT were widely detected across cell lines. Pro-estrogenic 17betaHSD1 mRNA was most abundant in neoplastic MCF10CA1a and MCF10DCIS.com cells, while 17betaHSD2 mRNA was more prominent in parental MCF10A cells. CYP1B1 mRNA was most abundant in MCF7 cells. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) induced SULT1E1 and CYP19 mRNA but suppressed CYP1B1, STS, COMT, 17betaHSD1, and 17betaHSD2 mRNA in MCF10A lineage cell lines. In MCF7 cells, TSA treatment suppressed ERalpha, CYP1B1, STS, COMT, SULT1A1, and SULT2B1 but induced ERbeta, CYP19 and SULT2A1 mRNA expression. The results indicate that relative to the MCF7 breast cancer cell line, key determinants of breast estrogen metabolism are differentially regulated in the MCF10A-derived lineage model for breast cancer progression.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 04/2009; 120(1):35-45. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer progression represents an evolutionary process where overall genome level changes reflect system instability and serve as a driving force for evolving new systems. To illustrate this principle it must be demonstrated that karyotypic heterogeneity (population diversity) directly contributes to tumorigenicity. Five well characterized in vitro tumor progression models representing various types of cancers were selected for such an analysis. The tumorigenicity of each model has been linked to different molecular pathways, and there is no common molecular mechanism shared among them. According to our hypothesis that genome level heterogeneity is a key to cancer evolution, we expect to reveal that the common link of tumorigenicity between these diverse models is elevated genome diversity. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) was used to compare the degree of karyotypic heterogeneity displayed in various sublines of these five models. The cell population diversity was determined by scoring type and frequencies of clonal and non-clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs and NCCAs). The tumorigenicity of these models has been separately analyzed. As expected, the highest level of NCCAs was detected coupled with the strongest tumorigenicity among all models analyzed. The karyotypic heterogeneity of both benign hyperplastic lesions and premalignant dysplastic tissues were further analyzed to support this conclusion. This common link between elevated NCCAs and increased tumorigenicity suggests an evolutionary causative relationship between system instability, population diversity, and cancer evolution. This study reconciles the difference between evolutionary and molecular mechanisms of cancer and suggests that NCCAs can serve as a biomarker to monitor the probability of cancer progression.
    Journal of Cellular Physiology 01/2009; 219(2):288-300. · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The MCF10A human breast epithelial cell lineage includes the benign MCF10A cells, premalignant cells (MCF10AT, MCF10ATG3B) and malignant MCF10CA1a tumor cells. The premalignant and tumor cells recapitulate the progressive alterations associated with the temporal development of PBD and carcinoma. Ras protein levels were elevated by 6.9-, 22.4- and 32.2-fold in 10AT, 10ATG3B and 10CA1a cells, respectively, relative to 10A cells. K-Ras was not detected, N-Ras levels were unchanged; Rac and Rho levels increased in 10CA1a tumor cells. Phospho-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1), phospho-PDK1, phospho-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) levels progressively increased in the cell lineage, with the greatest increase monitored in 10CA1a tumor cells. Phospho Ser 473 and Thr 408 Akt levels increased 10.2- and 136-fold in 10CA1a cells, respectively, relative to 10A cells. Phospho-p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) increased >2-fold in 10CA1a cells, relative to 10A cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed Ras, phospho-Akt and phospho-p70S6K (Thr 421/ Ser 424) expression in lesions arising from premalignant and tumor cells. FOXO 1, phospho-FOXO 1 and phospho-FOXO 4 were significantly elevated in 10ATG3B premalignant and 10CA1a tumor cells. Phospho-FOXO 3a was progressively elevated, with the greatest levels detected in 10CA1a tumor cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that phospho-FOXO 1, 3a and 4 staining was less in benign lesions, but elevated in advanced 10ATG3B and malignant 10CA1a lesions, showing a correspondence between the cells and lesions. Hence, phospho-Akt and phospho-FOXO 1, 3a and 4 merit consideration as biomarkers of tumorigenic risk from hyperplastic breast tissue.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2009; 124(12):2813-28. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Comedo-DCIS is a histologic subtype of preinvasive breast neoplasia that is characterized by prominent apoptotic cell death and has greater malignant potential than other DCIS subtypes. We investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis in comedo-DCIS and its role in conversion of comedo-DCIS to invasive cancer. Clinical comedo-DCIS excisions and the MCF10DCIS.com human breast cancer model which produces lesions resembling comedo-DCIS were analyzed. Apoptotic luminal and myoepithelial cells were identified by TUNEL and reactivity to cleaved PARP antibody and cell death assessed by Western blotting, Mitocapture and immunohistochemical assays. MCF10DCIS.com cells undergo spontaneous apoptosis in vitro, both in monolayers and multicellular spheroids; it is associated with increased mitochondrial membrane permeability, increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and occurs via caspase-9-dependent p53-independent pathway. This suggests that apoptosis is stromal-independent and that the cells are programmed to undergo apoptosis. Immunostaining with cleaved PARP antibody showed that myoepithelial apoptosis occurs before lesions progress to comedo-DCIS in both clinical comedo-DCIS and in vivo MCF10DCIS.com lesions. Intense staining for MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-11 was observed in the stroma and epithelia of solid DCIS lesions prior to conversion to comedo-DCIS in clinical and MCF10DCIS.com lesions. Gelatin zymography showed higher MMP-2 levels in lysates and conditioned media of MCF10DCIS. com cells undergoing apoptosis. These data suggest that signals arising from the outside (microenvironmental) and inside (internal genetic alterations) of the duct act in concert to trigger apoptosis of myoepithelial and luminal epithelial cells. Our findings implicate spontaneous apoptosis in both the etiology and progression of comedo-DCIS. It is possible that spontaneous apoptosis facilitates elimination of cells thus permitting expansion and malignant transformation of cancer cells that are resistant to spontaneous apoptosis.
    Cancer biology & therapy 12/2008; 7(11):1774-82. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The membrane glycoprotein component of the cellular proteome represents a promising source for potential disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Here we describe the development of a method that facilitates the analysis of membrane glycoproteins and apply it to the differential analysis of breast tumor cells with distinct malignant phenotypes. The approach combines two membrane extraction procedures, and enrichment using ConA and WGA lectin affinity columns, prior to digestion and analysis by LC-MS/MS. The glycoproteins are identified and quantified by spectral counting. Although the distribution of glycoprotein expression as a function of MW and p I was very similar between the two related cell lines tested, the approach enabled the identification of several distinct membrane glycoproteins with an expression index correlated with either a precancerous (MCF10AT1), or a malignant, metastatic cellular phenotype (MCF10CA1a). Among the proteins associated with the malignant phenotype, Gamma-glutamyl hydrolase, CD44, Galectin-3-binding protein, and Syndecan-1 protein have been reported as potential biomarkers of breast cancer.
    Journal of Proteome Research 09/2008; 7(10):4313-25. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    03/2008: pages 221 - 241; , ISBN: 9780470276266
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    ABSTRACT: An analysis of phosphorylation changes that occur during cancer progression would provide insights into the molecular pathways responsible for a malignant phenotype. In this study we employed a novel coupling of 2D-liquid separations and protein microarray technology to reveal changes in phosphoprotein status between premalignant (AT1) and malignant (CA1a) cell lines derived from the human MCF10A breast cell lines. Intact proteins were first separated according to their isoelectric point and hydrophobicities, then arrayed on SuperAmine glass slides. Phosphoproteins were detected using the universal, inorganic phospho-sensor dye, ProQ Diamond. Using this dye, out of 140 spots that were positive for phosphorylation, a total of 85 differentially expressed spots were detected over a pH range of 7.2 to 4.0. Proteins were identified and their peptides sequenced by mass spectrometry. The strategy enabled the identification of 75 differentially expressed phosphoproteins, from which 51 phosphorylation sites in 27 unique proteins were confirmed. Interestingly, the majority of differentially expressed phosphorylated proteins observed were nuclear proteins. Three regulators of apoptosis, Bad, Bax and Acinus, were also differentially phosphorylated in the two cell lines. Further development of this strategy will facilitate an understanding of the mechanisms involved in malignancy progression and other disease-related phenotypes.
    PROTEOMICS - CLINICAL APPLICATIONS 02/2008; 3(1):51-66. · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A proteomic characterization of one premalignant (MCF10AT1) and two malignant (MCF10CA1a and MCF10 CA1d) human breast cancer cell lines has been performed using a combination of two-dimensional liquid separations and mass spectrometry. Chromatofocusing (CF) and NPS-RP-HPLC are combined with ESI-TOF-MS to resolve and detect intact proteins. Simultaneously, fractions are collected and digested for protein identification using MALDI-MS peptide mass fingerprinting. Following protein identification a small database was compiled for use in comparison between IDs and measured masses taking into account variables such as pI, hydrophobicity and potential modifications. Out of 239 mass bands detected between pH 4.6 and 6.0, 133 have been definitively associated with identified proteins and 67 show consistent up/down regulation in two malignant breast cancer cell lines relative to the precursor premalignant cell line. Of these, 8 are also altered in the premalignant MCF10AT1 cell line by treatment with estradiol. Differentially expressed proteins indicate significant changes to the cytoskeleton, cellular metabolism, and adaptation to environmental stressors in malignant cell lines.
    International Journal of Oncology 11/2007; 31(4):941-9. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MCF10DCIS.com cells form comedo type ductal carcinoma in situ in immune-deficient mice before forming invasive ductal carcinoma. As the lesions mature, both stromal and epithelial cells undergo phenotypic changes detected by immunohistochemistry. Myofibroblasts are present before the formation of carcinoma in situ and after development of invasive carcinoma. MCF10DCIS. com lesions develop a myoepithelial layer prior to exhibiting a basement membrane surrounding the ductal mass. TGFbeta1 is initially expressed by the epithelial cells but is expressed by stroma in invasive carcinoma. Stromal derived factor-1 is detected in epithelial cells in early carcinoma in situ but is produced in stromal cells in invasive carcinoma. The receptor CXCR4 is expressed by epithelial cells in the xenografts at all times, as is the hepatocyte growth factor receptor c-met. MCF10DCIS.com xenografts illustrate the dynamic interplay of epithelium and stroma in the development of carcinoma in situ and subsequent invasive carcinoma. Although the phenotype of the epithelial cells may be dependent upon the stroma, the malignant epithelium induces the development of the stroma necessary for progression to the invasive stage. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 06/2007; 120(10):2127-34. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A comprehensive platform that integrates information from the protein and peptide levels by combining various MS techniques has been employed for the analysis of proteins in fully malignant human breast cancer cells. The cell lysates were subjected to chromatofocusing fractionation, followed by tryptic digestion of pH fractions for on-line monolithic RP-HPLC interfaced with linear ion trap MS analysis for rapid protein identification. This unique approach of direct analysis of pH fractions resulted in the identification of large numbers of proteins from several selected pH fractions, in which approximately 1.5 microg of each of the pH fraction digests was consumed for an analysis time of ca 50 min. In order to combine valuable information retained at the protein level with the protein identifications obtained from the peptide level information, the same pH fraction was analyzed using nonporous (NPS)-RP-HPLC/ESI-TOF MS to obtain intact protein MW measurements. In order to further validate the protein identification procedures from the fraction digest analysis, NPS-RP-HPLC separation was performed for off-line protein collection to closely examine each protein using MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-quadrupole ion trap (QIT)-TOF MS, and excellent agreement of protein identifications was consistently observed. It was also observed that the comparison to intact MW and other MS information was particularly useful for analyzing proteins whose identifications were suggested by one sequenced peptide from fraction digest analysis.
    Journal of Mass Spectrometry 04/2007; 42(3):312-34. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The establishment of the correct conceptual framework is vital to any scientific discipline including cancer research. Influenced by hematologic cancer studies, the current cancer concept focuses on the stepwise patterns of progression as defined by specific recurrent genetic aberrations. This concept has faced a tough challenge as the majority of cancer cases follow non-linear patterns and display stochastic progression. In light of the recent discovery that genomic instability is directly linked to stochastic non-clonal chromosome aberrations (NCCAs), and that cancer progression can be characterized as a dynamic relationship between NCCAs and recurrent clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), we propose that the dynamics of NCCAs is a key element for karyotypic evolution in solid tumors. To support this viewpoint, we briefly discuss various basic elements responsible for cancer initiation and progression within an evolutionary context. We argue that even though stochastic changes can be detected at various levels of genetic organization, such as at the gene level and epigenetic level, it is primarily detected at the chromosomal or genome level. Thus, NCCA-mediated genomic variation plays a dominant role in cancer progression. To further illustrate the involvement of NCCA/CCA cycles in the pattern of cancer evolution, four cancer evolutionary models have been proposed based on the comparative analysis of karyotype patterns of various types of cancer.
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 09/2006; 98(6):1424-35. · 3.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the establishment of a breast epithelial cell model that undergoes growth arrest at different stages of the cell cycle depending upon the DNA damaging agents encountered. Primary breast epithelial cells from normal reductive mammoplasty were grown in low-calcium culture medium. Free-floating cells under this condition were separated and used for establishment of the MCF-15 breast epithelial cell line. We found that MCF-15 breast epithelial cells display a superb response to different phases of the cell cycle arrest in response to various DNA damaging agents. Immunohistological analysis indicates that MCF-15 cells express cytokeratin 19, CD44, CXCR4, SDF-1, SPARC and vimentin. Although less than 5% of the MCF-15 cells expressed Muc-1 in culture, increased Muc-1 expression was observed in luminal epithelial cells along the newly formed lumen in xenografts. Furthermore, a small population of MCF-15 cells expressed estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) in xenografts while ERalpha expression was not detected in monolayer culture. Therefore, the MCF-15 breast epithelial cell line possesses characteristics of breast progenitor cells and provides a good cell culture model for studying the response to DNA damage and the etiology of aggressive basal-like breast cancers.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 09/2006; 98(3):357-64. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A method is developed to integrate a protein separation by monolithic capillary reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to on-probe tryptic digestion for subsequent analyses by MALDI-TOF MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The method provides a means of directly interfacing separations to MALDI-MS, reducing the amount of time required for traditional procedures involving in-solution enzymatic digestion and sample cleanup prior to MALDI-MS analysis. When used with pI-based fractionation as a first dimension, it provides a means of analyzing complex mixtures of proteins with minimal sample handling and cleanup. The use of monolithic capillary columns sufficiently resolved intact proteins so that peptide mass fingerprinting analysis by MALDI-TOF MS resulted in the identification of close to 40 unique proteins from 120 ng of sample obtained from a prefractionated MCF10 cell line at pH 6.34, where the identifications of several of these proteins were also confirmed by intact MW and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. The reproducibility of this method has been demonstrated to be sufficient for the purpose of protein identifications. Experimental values of protein intact MW are obtained and compared to that expected for each protein identified.
    Analytical Chemistry 08/2006; 78(14):5198-204. · 5.70 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
538.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2011
    • Karmanos Cancer Institute
      • Division of Hematology and Oncology
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
    • George Washington University
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 2008
    • University of Florida
      • Department of Surgery
      Gainesville, FL, United States
  • 1998–2008
    • University of Michigan
      • Department of Chemistry
      Ann Arbor, MI, United States
  • 1990–2007
    • Wayne State University
      • • Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute
      • • Department of Biological Sciences
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 1996–2001
    • University of South Florida
      Tampa, Florida, United States
  • 1993
    • Molecular and Cellular Biology Program
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1979
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1978–1979
    • Brown University
      • Department of Medicine
      Providence, RI, United States
  • 1974
    • Stony Brook University
      • Health Sciences Center
      Stony Brook, NY, United States