Joseph F Polak

Beverly Hospital, Boston MA, Beverly, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (276)1849.12 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The benefits of healthy habits are well established, but it is unclear whether making health behavior changes as an adult can still alter coronary artery disease risk.
    Circulation 07/2014; 130(1):10-7. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Common carotid artery (CCA) intima-media thickness (IMT) can be measured using ultrasound near to or below the carotid bulb. This might affect associations of IMT with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and events.
    Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography: official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography 06/2014; · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is unclear to what extent subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) are mediators of the known associations between traditional cardiovascular risk factors and incident CVD events. We assessed the portion of the effects of risk factors on incident CVD events that are mediated through CAC, CIMT, and FMD.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 05/2014; · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate atherosclerosis progression and identify influencing factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases. 05/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Pregnancy and childbirth are associated with hemodynamic changes and vascular remodeling. It is not known whether parity is associated with later adverse vascular properties such as larger arterial diameter, wall thickness, and lower distensibility. We used baseline data from 3283 women free of cardiovascular disease aged 45 to 84 years enrolled in the population-based Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants self-reported parity status. Ultrasound-derived carotid artery lumen diameters and brachial artery blood pressures were measured at peak-systole and end-diastole. Common carotid intima-media thickness was also measured. Regression models to determine the association of carotid distensibility coefficient, lumen diameter, and carotid intima-media thickness with parity were adjusted for age, race, height, weight, diabetes mellitus, current smoking, blood pressure medication use, and total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The prevalence of nulliparity was 18%. In adjusted models, carotid distensibility coefficient was 0.09×10(-5) Pa(-1) lower (P=0.009) in parous versus nulliparous women. Among parous women, there was a nonlinear association with the greatest carotid distensibility coefficient seen in women with 2 live births and significantly lower distensibility seen in primiparas (P=0.04) or with higher parity >2 (P=0.005). No such pattern of association with parity was found for lumen diameter or carotid intima-media thickness. Parity is associated with lower carotid artery distensibility, suggesting arterial remodeling that lasts beyond childbirth. These long-term effects on the vasculature may explain the association of parity with cardiovascular events later in life.
    Hypertension 05/2014; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: -Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) is a phosphate regulatory hormone that directly stimulates left ventricular hypertrophy in experimental models. The role of FGF-23 in cardiovascular disease development in the general population is unclear. We tested associations of FGF-23 with major subclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease outcomes in a large prospective cohort. -We evaluated 6,547 participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) who were initially free of cardiovascular disease. We measured serum FGF-23 using the Kainos immunoassay. The MESA measured left ventricular (LV) mass by magnetic resonance imaging, coronary calcium (CAC) by computed tomography, and carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) by ultrasound. The MESA adjudicated incident heart failure, coronary heart disease, and stoke by medical record review. After adjustment, the highest FGF-23 quartile was associated with an estimated 2.4 gram greater LV mass (95% CI 0.4, 4.5 greater) and a 26% greater odds of higher CAC scores (95% CI 9% to 46% greater) compared to the lowest quartile. Over 7.5 years follow-up, each 20-pg/mL higher FGF-23 concentration was associated with a 19% greater risk of heart failure (95% CI 3% to 37% greater) and a 14% greater risk of coronary heart disease (95% CI 1% to 28% greater). FGF-23 was not associated with carotid IMT or stroke. -Higher serum FGF-23 concentrations are associated with subclinical cardiac disease and with new heart failure and coronary disease events, but not with carotid IMT or stroke. FGF-23 may be a novel cardiovascular risk factor in the general population.
    Circulation Heart Failure 03/2014; · 6.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data describing relationships between change in risk factors and coronary artery calcification (CAC) are lacking and could inform optimal cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment strategies. This study aimed to examine how change in traditional cardiometabolic risk factors related to change in CAC among individuals with detectable subclinical atherosclerosis. Latent growth modeling was used to examine change in cardiometabolic risk factors (waist circumference, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose) related to change in CAC up to an average 4.9-year follow-up in a multi-ethnic cohort of 3398 asymptomatic individuals (57.8% men) who had detectable CAC (score >0) at baseline, adjusting for baseline risk factor levels and CAC values, age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, family history of CVD, income, and use of antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and glucose-lowering medications. Greater declines in blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at follow-up were each associated with greater CAC progression. The observed inverse associations were attributable to greater CAC progression in participants taking antihypertensive and lipid-lowering drugs who, as expected, had declines in blood pressure and lipid levels, respectively. These inverse associations did not emerge in participants not taking these medications. Among individuals with subclinical atherosclerosis, the unexpected inverse associations observed between change in blood pressure and lipid levels with CAC progression emphasize the importance of considering medication use, and, when feasible, the severity and duration of disease, in exploring associations between risk factors and CAC change.
    International journal of cardiology 03/2014; · 7.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The common carotid artery interadventitial diameter is measured on ultrasound images as the distance between the media-adventitia interfaces of the near and far walls. It is associated with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass and might therefore also have an association with incident stroke. We studied 6255 individuals free of coronary heart disease and stroke at baseline with mean age of 62.2 years (47.3% men), members of a multiethnic community-based cohort of whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese. Ischemic stroke events were centrally adjudicated. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter and IMT were measured. Cases with incident atrial fibrillation (n=385) were excluded. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were generated with time to ischemic event as outcome, adjusting for risk factors. There were 115 first-time ischemic strokes at 7.8 years of follow-up. Common carotid artery interadventitial diameter was a significant predictor of ischemic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-2.17 per millimeter) and remained so after adjustment for risk factors and common carotid IMT with a hazard ratio of 1.52/mm (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.88). Common carotid IMT was not an independent predictor after adjustment (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-1.19). Although common carotid IMT is not associated with stroke, interadventitial diameter of the common carotid artery is independently associated with first-time incident ischemic stroke even after adjusting for IMT. Our hypothesis that this is in part attributable to the effects of exposure to blood pressure needs confirmation by other studies. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00063440.
    Stroke 03/2014; · 6.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a marker of cardiovascular risk. It is unclear whether measurement of mean common CIMT improves 10-year risk prediction of first-time myocardial infarction or stroke in individuals with elevated blood pressure. We performed an analysis among individuals with elevated blood pressure (ie, a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm Hg) in USE-IMT, a large ongoing individual participant data meta-analysis. We refitted the risk factors of the Framingham Risk Score on asymptomatic individuals (baseline model) and expanded this model with mean common CIMT (CIMT model) measurements. From both models, 10-year risks to develop a myocardial infarction or stroke were estimated. In individuals with elevated blood pressure, we compared discrimination and calibration of the 2 models and calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI). We included 17 254 individuals with elevated blood pressure from 16 studies. During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 2014 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. The C-statistics of the baseline and CIMT models were similar (0.73). NRI with the addition of mean common CIMT was small and not significant (1.4%; 95% confidence intervals, -1.1 to 3.7). In those at intermediate risk (n=5008, 10-year absolute risk of 10% to 20%), the NRI was 5.6% (95% confidence intervals, 1.6-10.4). There is no added value of measurement of mean common CIMT in individuals with elevated blood pressure for improving cardiovascular risk prediction. For those at intermediate risk, the addition of mean common CIMT to an existing cardiovascular risk score is small but statistically significant.
    Hypertension 03/2014; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose To determine if carotid plaque morphology and composition with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to identify asymptomatic subjects at risk for cardiovascular events. Materials and Methods Institutional review boards at each site approved the study, and all sites were Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant. A total of 946 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) were evaluated with MR imaging and ultrasonography (US). MR imaging was used to define carotid plaque composition and remodeling index (wall area divided by the sum of wall area and lumen area), while US was used to assess carotid wall thickness. Incident cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, angina, stroke, and death, were ascertained for an average of 5.5 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, C statistics, and net reclassification improvement (NRI) for event prediction were determined. Results Cardiovascular events occurred in 59 (6%) of participants. Carotid IMT as well as MR imaging remodeling index, lipid core, and calcium in the internal carotid artery were significant predictors of events in univariate analysis (P < .001 for all). For traditional risk factors, the C statistic for event prediction was 0.696. For MR imaging remodeling index and lipid core, the C statistic was 0.734 and the NRI was 7.4% and 15.8% for participants with and those without cardiovascular events, respectively (P = .02). The NRI for US IMT in addition to traditional risk factors was not significant. Conclusion The identification of vulnerable plaque characteristics with MR imaging aids in cardiovascular disease prediction and improves the reclassification of baseline cardiovascular risk. © RSNA, 2014.
    Radiology 02/2014; · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whereas endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is cytoprotective at physiologic levels, excess CO concentrations are associated with cardiometabolic risk and may represent an important marker of progression from subclinical to clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD). In 1926 participants of the Framingham Offspring Study (aged 57 ± 10 years, 46% women), we investigated the relationship of exhaled CO, a surrogate of blood CO concentration, with both prevalent subclinical CVD and incident clinical CVD events. Presence of subclinical CVD was determined using a comprehensive panel of diagnostic tests used to assess cardiac and vascular structure and function. Individuals with the highest (>5 p.p.m.) compared with lowest (≤4 p.p.m.) CO exposure were more likely to have subclinical CVD [odds ratios (OR): 1.67, 95% CI: 1.32-2.12; P < 0.001]. During the follow-up period (mean 5 ± 3 years), 193 individuals developed overt CVD. Individuals with both high CO levels and any baseline subclinical CVD developed overt CVD at an almost four-fold higher rate compared with those with low CO levels and no subclinical disease (22.1 vs. 6.3%). Notably, elevated CO was associated with incident CVD in the presence [hazards ration (HR): 1.83, 95% CI: 1.08-3.11; P = 0.026] but not in the absence (HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.42-1.53; P = 0.51) of subclinical CVD (Pinteraction = 0.019). Similarly, subclinical CVD was associated with incident CVD in the presence of high but not low CO exposure. Our findings in a community-based sample suggest that elevated CO is a marker of greater subclinical CVD burden and, furthermore, a potential key component in the progression from subclinical to clinical CVD.
    European Heart Journal 02/2014; · 14.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: L-selectin has been suggested to play a role in atherosclerosis. Previous studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and serum or plasma L-selectin are inconsistent. The association of serum L-selectin (sL-selectin) with carotid intima-media thickness, coronary artery calcium, ankle-brachial index (subclinical CVD) and incident CVD was assessed within 2403 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Regression analysis and the Tobit model were used to study subclinical disease; Cox Proportional Hazards regression for incident CVD. Mean age was 63 ± 10, 47% were males; mean sL-selectin was significantly different across ethnicities. Within each race/ethnicity, sL-selectin was associated with age and sex; among Caucasians and African Americans, it was associated with smoking status and current alcohol use. sL-selectin levels did not predict subclinical or clinical CVD after correction for multiple comparisons. Conditional logistic regression models were used to study plasma L-selectin and CVD within 154 incident CVD cases, occurred in a median follow up of 8.5 years, and 306 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls. L-selectin levels in plasma were significantly lower than in serum and the overall concordance was low. Plasma levels were not associated with CVD. In conclusion, this large multi-ethnic population, soluble L-selectin levels did not predict clinical or subclinical CVD.
    Translational Research. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an emerging biomarker of CVD. This study was conducted to describe the distribution of Lp-PLA2 in a cohort of HIV-infected adults and to determine associations between Lp-PLA2, cardiometabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis (AS) in this population. Methods. Lp-PLA2 was assessed in 341 (25% women, 52% white, 74% on HAART) participants of a cohort with detailed characterization of atherogenic risk factors, including surrogate markers of carotid and coronary AS. Results. Mean Lp-PLA2 mass was 313+105 ng/ml and activity 173+49 nmol/min/ml. 75% of participants had abnormal Lp-PLA2. Those in the highest Framingham Risk Score (FRS) tertile had significantly higher Lp-PLA2 activity. Participants with abnormal carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) had higher Lp-PLA2 mass and activity. Those with coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores >100 had significantly higher Lp-PLA2 mass than those with lower or non-detectable calcium. Those on HAART and PI-based treatment had significantly higher Lp-PLA2 mass and activity than those who were treatment-naive or not on PIs. In multivariate regression, HAART- and PI-use were positively associated with Lp-PLA2 activity and mass after adjusting for age, race, gender, LDL, TG, HDL and smoking. Adding Lp-PLA2 activity tertiles to the model improved the predictive value for abnormal common cIMT, but not internal cIMT or CAC score. Conclusions. Lp-PLA2 is highly abnormal in HIV-infected patients and is associated with several CV and HIV treatment-specific risk factors. Lp-PLA2 may be used as an additional and more vascular specific biomarker for CV risk stratification in HIV-positive patients.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 12/2013; · 9.37 Impact Factor
  • Diabetes care 09/2013; 36(9):e153-4. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate changes in cardiovascular disease risk surrogate markers in a longitudinal cohort of HIV-infected adults over 6 years. Internal carotid artery (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) intima-media thickness (IMT), coronary artery calcium (CAC), vascular, and HIV risk factors were prospectively examined over 6 years in HIV-infected adults from 2002 to 2010. Longitudinal cohort study with participants from urban center and surrounding communities. Three hundred forty-five HIV-infected participants were recruited from a longitudinal cohort study. Two hundred eleven participants completed the study and were included in this analysis. Total and yearly ICA and CCA IMT change; CAC score progression. Participants were 27% female and 49% nonwhite; mean age at start was 45 ± 7 years. The median change in ICA and CCA over 6 years was 0.15 mm (0.08, 0.28) and 0.12 mm (0.09, 0.15), respectively. Age, baseline triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, and pack-years smoking were associated with ICA IMT change; age, cholesterol, nadir CD4 count, and protease inhibitor use were associated with CCA IMT change. Diabetes, HIV viral load, and highly active antiretroviral therapy duration were associated with CAC progression. Carotid IMT and CAC progressed in this HIV-infected cohort. Some HIV-specific characteristics were associated with surrogate marker changes, but the majority of risk factors continue to be traditional. Aggressive identification and management of modifiable risk factors may reduce progression of cardiovascular disease risk in this population.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 09/2013; 64(1):51-7. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the major cause of death in the United States. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores are independent predictors of CHD. African Americans (AA) have higher rates of CHD but are less well-studied in genomic studies. We assembled the largest AA data resource currently available with measured CAC to identify associated genetic variants. We analyzed log transformed CAC quantity (ln(CAC + 1)), for association with ~2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and performed an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis on results for 5,823 AA from 8 studies. Heritability was calculated using family studies. The most significant SNPs among AAs were evaluated in European Ancestry (EA) CAC data; conversely, the significance of published SNPs for CAC/CHD in EA was queried within our AA meta-analysis. Heritability of CAC was lower in AA (~30%) than previously reported for EA (~50%). No SNP reached genome wide significance (p < 5E-08). Of 67 SNPs with p < 1E-05 in AA there was no evidence of association in EA CAC data. Four SNPs in regions previously implicated in CAC/CHD (at 9p21 and PHACTR1) in EA reached nominal significance for CAC in AA, with concordant direction. Among AA, rs16905644 (p = 4.08E-05) had the strongest association in the 9p21 region. While we observed substantial heritability for CAC in AA, we failed to identify loci for CAC at genome-wide significant levels despite having adequate power to detect alleles with moderate to large effects. Although suggestive signals in AA were apparent at 9p21 and additional CAC and CAD EA loci, overall the data suggest that even larger samples and an ethnic specific focus will be required for GWAS discoveries for CAC in AA populations.
    BMC Medical Genetics 07/2013; 14(1):75. · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Resting heart rate is an easily measured, noninvasive vital sign that is associated with cardiovascular disease events. The pathophysiology of this association is not known. We investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and stiffness of the carotid (a peripheral artery) and the aorta (a central artery) in an asymptomatic multi-ethnic population. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Distensibility was used as a measure of arterial elasticity, with a lower distensibility indicating an increase in arterial stiffness. Carotid distensibility was measured in 6484 participants (98% of participants) using B-mode ultrasound, and aortic distensibility was measured in 3512 participants (53% of participants) using cardiac MRI. Heart rate was divided into quintiles and we used progressively adjusted models that included terms for physical activity and atrioventricular nodal blocking agents. Mean resting heart rate of participants (mean age, 62 years; 47% men) was 63 bpm (SD, 9.6 bpm). In unadjusted and fully adjusted models, carotid distensibility and aortic distensibility decreased monotonically with increasing resting heart rate (P for trend <0.001 and 0.009, respectively). The relationship was stronger for carotid versus aortic distensibility. Similar results were seen using the resting heart rate taken at the time of MRI scanning. Our results suggest that a higher resting heart rate is associated with an increased arterial stiffness independent of atrioventricular nodal blocker use and physical activity level, with a stronger association for a peripheral (carotid) compared with a central (aorta) artery.
    Hypertension 07/2013; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing adiposity increases the risk for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Adipokines are hormone-like substances from adipose tissue that influence several metabolic pathways relevant to LV hypertrophy. Data were obtained from participants enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and who also had fasting venous blood assayed for 4 distinct adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and resistin). One-thousand four hundred sixty four MESA participants had complete data. The mean age was 61.5 years, the mean body mass index was 27.6 kg/m(2), and 49% were women. With adjustment for age, gender, race, height, and weight, multivariate linear regression modeling revealed that a 1-SD increment in leptin was significantly associated with smaller LV mass (ß: -4.66% predicted, p <0.01), LV volume (-5.87% predicted, p <0.01), stroke volume (-3.23 ml, p <0.01), and cardiac output (-120 ml/min, p = 0.01) as well as a lower odds ratio for the presence of LV hypertrophy (odds ratio 0.65, p <0.01), but a higher ejection fraction (0.44%, p = 0.05). Additional adjustment for the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, insulin resistance, physical activity, education, income, inflammatory biomarkers, other selected adipokines, and pericardial fat did not materially change the magnitude or significance of the associations. The associations between the other adipokines and LV structure and function were inconsistent and largely nonsignificant. In conclusion, the results indicate that higher levels of leptin are associated with more favorable values of several measures of LV structure and function.
    The American journal of cardiology 05/2013; · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Concentrations of outdoor fine particulate matter (PM2.5) have been associated with cardiovascular disease. PM2.5 chemical composition may be responsible for effects of exposure to PM2.5. METHODS: Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) collected in 2000--2002 on 6,256 US adults without clinical cardiovascular disease in six U.S. metropolitan areas, we investigated cross-sectional associations of estimated long-term exposure to total PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 components (elemental carbon [EC], organic carbon [OC], silicon and sulfur) with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium [CAC] and right common carotid intima-media thickness [CIMT]). Community monitors deployed for this study from 2007 to 2008 were used to estimate exposures at baseline addresses using three commonly-used approaches: (1) nearest monitor (the primary approach), (2) inverse-distance monitor weighting and (3) city-wide average. RESULTS: Using the exposure estimate based on nearest monitor, in single-pollutant models, increased OC (effect estimate [95% CI] per IQR: 35.1mum [26.8, 43.3]), EC (9.6mum [3.6,15.7]), sulfur (22.7mum [15.0,30.4]) and total PM2.5 (14.7mum [9.0,20.5]) but not silicon (5.2mum [-9.8,20.1]), were associated with increased CIMT; in two-pollutant models, only the association with OC was robust to control for the other pollutants. Findings were generally consistent across the three exposure estimation approaches. None of the PM measures were positively associated with either the presence or extent of CAC. In sensitivity analyses, effect estimates for OC and silicon were particularly sensitive to control for metropolitan area. CONCLUSION: Employing commonly-used exposure estimation approaches, all of the PM2.5 components considered, except silicon, were associated with increased CIMT, with the evidence being strongest for OC; no component was associated with increased CAC. PM2.5 chemical components, or other features of the sources that produced them, may be important in determining the effect of PM exposure on atherosclerosis. These cross-sectional findings await confirmation in future work employing longitudinal outcome measures and using more sophisticated approaches to estimating exposure.
    Environmental Health 05/2013; 12(1):39. · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been linked to cardiovascular disease, possibly via accelerated atherosclerosis. We examined associations between the progression of the intima-medial thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery, as an indicator of atherosclerosis, and long-term PM2.5 concentrations in participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). MESA, a prospective cohort study, enrolled 6,814 participants at the baseline exam (2000-2002), with 5,660 (83%) of those participants completing two ultrasound examinations between 2000 and 2005 (mean follow-up: 2.5 years). PM2.5 was estimated over the year preceding baseline and between ultrasounds using a spatio-temporal model. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations were examined using mixed models adjusted for confounders including age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, and socio-economic indicators. Among 5,362 participants (5% of participants had missing data) with a mean annual progression of 14 µm/y, 2.5 µg/m(3) higher levels of residential PM2.5 during the follow-up period were associated with 5.0 µm/y (95% CI 2.6 to 7.4 µm/y) greater IMT progressions among persons in the same metropolitan area. Although significant associations were not found with IMT progression without adjustment for metropolitan area (0.4 µm/y [95% CI -0.4 to 1.2 µm/y] per 2.5 µg/m(3)), all of the six areas showed positive associations. Greater reductions in PM2.5 over follow-up for a fixed baseline PM2.5 were also associated with slowed IMT progression (-2.8 µm/y [95% CI -1.6 to -3.9 µm/y] per 1 µg/m(3) reduction). Study limitations include the use of a surrogate measure of atherosclerosis, some loss to follow-up, and the lack of estimates for air pollution concentrations prior to 1999. This early analysis from MESA suggests that higher long-term PM2.5 concentrations are associated with increased IMT progression and that greater reductions in PM2.5 are related to slower IMT progression. These findings, even over a relatively short follow-up period, add to the limited literature on air pollution and the progression of atherosclerotic processes in humans. If confirmed by future analyses of the full 10 years of follow-up in this cohort, these findings will help to explain associations between long-term PM2.5 concentrations and clinical cardiovascular events. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
    PLoS Medicine 04/2013; 10(4):e1001430. · 15.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

11k Citations
1,849.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Beverly Hospital, Boston MA
      Beverly, Massachusetts, United States
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      • Medical School
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
    • Northwestern University
      • Division of Cardiology (Dept. of Medicine)
      Evanston, IL, United States
  • 2010–2014
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Radiology
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • University of Florida
      Gainesville, Florida, United States
  • 1999–2014
    • Tufts Medical Center
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2013
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2006–2013
    • Tufts University
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Tufts Center for Conservation Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Georgia, United States
  • 2012
    • Soonchunhyang University
      Onyang, South Chungcheong, South Korea
    • University of Massachusetts Medical School
      • Department of Radiology
      Worcester, MA, United States
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1998–2011
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • • Cardiovascular Health Research Unit (CHRU)
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      • • Department of Neurology
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Medical School
      Dallas, TX, United States
    • University of Minnesota Twin Cities
      • Division of Epidemiology and Community Health
      Minneapolis, MN, United States
    • University of Virginia
      Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Birmingham, AL, United States
  • 2004–2008
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of General Medicine and Primary Care
      Boston, MA, United States
    • National Institutes of Health
      Maryland, United States
  • 2007
    • New England Baptist Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1982–2007
    • Harvard Medical School
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Radiology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1983–2006
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Center for Brain Mind Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2005
    • Boston University
      • • School of Public Health
      • • Department of Radiology
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 1992–2005
    • University of Vermont
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pathology
      Burlington, VT, United States
    • Geisinger Medical Center
      Danville, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2003–2004
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
      • Division of Cardiovascular Sciences (DCVS)
      Maryland, United States
    • Singapore Eye Research Institute
      Tumasik, Singapore
  • 2000
    • Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
    • Loyola University Medical Center
      Maywood, Illinois, United States
    • Carolinas Medical Center University
      Charlotte, North Carolina, United States
  • 1988–1999
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • Department of Radiology
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 1996
    • University of Groningen
      • Department of Health Sciences
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands
  • 1994
    • University of São Paulo
      • Faculty of Medicine (FM)
      São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil
    • Penn State Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine
      Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States
    • Texas Heart Institute
      Houston, Texas, United States