J Angel

Autonomous University of Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (54)297.66 Total impact

  • Value in Health 01/2011; 14(7). · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    Circulation. 03/2010; 121(10):1176-87.
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    Circulation 03/2010; 121(10):1176-87.. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify the therapeutic regimens used at discharge in patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) who undergo stenting percutaneous coronary intervention and stent implantation (PCI-S), and to assess the safety and efficacy associated with different therapeutic regimens according to thromboembolic risk. A prospective multicentre registry. In hospital, after discharge and follow-up by telephone call. 405 patients (328 male/77 female; mean (SD) age 71 (9) years) receiving OAT who underwent PCI-S between November 2003 and June 2006 from nine catheterisation laboratories of tertiary care teaching hospitals in Spain and one in the United Kingdom were included. Three therapeutic regimens were identified at discharge: triple therapy (TT) -- that is, any anticoagulant (AC) plus double antiplatelet therapy (DAT; 278 patients (68.6%); AC and a single antiplatelet (AC+AT; 46 (11.4%)) and DAT only (81 (20%)). At 6 months, patients receiving TT showed the greatest rate of bleeding events. No patients receiving DAT at low thromboembolic risk presented a bleeding event (14.8% receiving TT, 11.8% receiving AC+AT and 0% receiving DAT, p = 0.033) or cardiovascular event (6.7% receiving TT, 0% receiving AC+AT and 0% receiving DAT, p = 0.126). The combination of AC+AT showed the worst rate of adverse events in the whole cohort, especially in patients at moderate-high thromboembolic risk. In patients receiving OAT, TT was the most commonly used regimen after PCI-S. DAT was associated with the lowest rate of bleeding events and a similar efficacy to TT in patients at low thromboembolic risk. TT should probably be restricted to patients at moderate-high thromboembolic risk.
    Heart (British Cardiac Society) 06/2009; 95(18):1483-8. · 5.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Volume expansion has been proposed as an alternative treatment for cardiac tamponade; however, the scientific evidence for this recommendation is very poor. Forty-nine unselected patients (23 males; age 55+/-16 years) with large pericardial effusion and hemodynamic tamponade underwent fluid overload with intravenous administration of 500 mL of normal saline over 10 minutes. Cardiac index and intrapericardial, left ventricular end-diastolic, right atrial, and right ventricular end-diastolic pressures were measured during basal state (tamponade), after fluid overload, and after pericardiocentesis. Twenty-eight patients (57%) had physical signs of tamponade, and 10 (20%) were hypotensive. Size of pericardial effusion was 31+/-13 mm. Initial mean arterial pressure was 88+/-21 mm Hg, and cardiac index was 2.46+/-0.80 L x min(-1) x m(-2). Intrapericardial pressure was 8.31+/-5.98 mm Hg. Volume expansion caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (from 88+/-21 to 94+/-23 mm Hg, P=0.003) and cardiac index (from 2.46+/-0.80 to 2.64+/-0.68 L x min(-1) x m(-2), P=0.013), as well as in intrapericardial pressure (from 8.31+/-5.98 to 11.02+/-6.27 mm Hg, P=0.0001), right atrial pressure (from 9.76+/-5.91 to 12.82+/-6.34 mm Hg, P=0.0001), and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (from 14.21+/-5.97 to 19.48+/-6.19 mm Hg, P=0.0001). Cardiac index increased by >10% in 23 patients (47%), remained unchanged in 11 (22%), and decreased in 15 (31%). No patient developed clinical complications. Predictors of this favorable response were systolic blood pressure <100 mm Hg and low cardiac index. Approximately one half of patients with cardiac tamponade develop a significant increase in cardiac output after volume overload. Low systolic blood pressure (<100 mm Hg) at baseline was the simplest clinical finding that was predictive of this favorable response.
    Circulation 04/2008; 117(12):1545-9. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Low-pressure cardiac tamponade is a form of cardiac tamponade in which a comparatively low pericardial pressure results in cardiac compression because of low filling pressure. This syndrome is poorly characterized because only isolated cases have been reported. We conducted a study of its clinical and hemodynamic profiles. From 1986 through 2004, we evaluated all patients at our institution with combined pericardiocentesis and cardiac catheterization. We identified those patients who fulfilled catheterization-based criteria of low-pressure cardiac tamponade and compared their clinical and catheterization data with those of patients with classic tamponade. A total of 1429 patients with pericarditis were evaluated, 279 of whom underwent combined pericardiocentesis and catheterization. Criteria of low-pressure cardiac tamponade were met in 29, whereas 114 had criteria of classic cardiac tamponade. Patients with low-pressure tamponade less frequently had clinical signs of tamponade, but the rate of constitutional symptoms, use of diuretics, and echocardiographic findings of tamponade were similar in both groups. Patients with low-pressure tamponade showed a significant increase in cardiac output after pericardiocentesis, but they usually had less severe cardiac tamponade compared with patients with classic tamponade. Prognosis was related mainly to the underlying disease. Low-pressure cardiac tamponade was identified in 20% of patients with catheterization-based criteria of tamponade. Clinical recognition may be difficult because of the absence of typical physical findings of tamponade in most patients. Although some patients are critically ill, most show a stable clinical condition. However, these patients obtain a clear benefit from pericardiocentesis.
    Circulation 09/2006; 114(9):945-52. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The last guidelines recommend a standardized 17-segment model for tomographic imaging of the left ventricle. The aim of this study is to analyse the correspondence of the 17 left ventricular segments with each coronary artery by myocardial perfusion SPECT studies. Fifty patients selected for percutaneous revascularization of one coronary artery [24 left anterior descending (LAD), 15 right coronary artery (RCA), and 11 left circumflex (LCX)] were included. The (99m)Tc-labelled compound was injected immediately after the inflation of the balloon during percutaneous coronary angioplasty. At least 90 s of complete occlusion time was required. Maximal contour of regions of hypoperfusion corresponding to each coronary artery occlusion were delineated over the polar map of 17 segments. Nine segments corresponded to only one coronary artery: eight to LAD (basal anterior, basal anteroseptal, mid-anterior, mid-anteroseptal, apical anterior, apical septal, apical lateral, and apex) and one to LCX (basal anterolateral). Basal inferoseptal, mid-inferoseptal, and apical inferior segments could correspond to LAD or RCA. Basal inferior, basal inferolateral, mid-inferior, and mid-inferolateral segments could correspond to RCA or LCX, whereas the mid-anterolateral segment could correspond to LAD or LCX. The most specific segments (anterior, anteroseptal, and all apical segments except the infero-apical) correspond to LAD but no segment can be exclusively attributed to the RCA. Inferoseptal segments can be attributed to LAD or RCA, inferior and inferolateral segments to RCA or LCX, and mid-anterolateral segment to LAD or LCX.
    European Heart Journal 01/2006; 26(24):2637-43. · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have demonstrated a correlation between myocardial ischemia and severity of coronary lesions as determined by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. However, their value for the assessment of mild coronary stenoses that are associated with myocardial perfusion abnormalities has not been well studied. The objective of this study was to prospectively compare the results of myocardial perfusion as determined by exercise/dipyridamole myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography with IVUS and FFR measurements in patients who had angiographically mild coronary stenosis (< 50% diameter stenosis by quantitative coronary angiography). Forty-eight patients who had stable coronary disease (61 +/- 11 years of age; 6 women) were included. All had mild coronary stenosis in the proximal/middle segment of > or = 1 coronary artery and had undergone maximal exercise myocardial technetium-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography within 48 hours before coronary angiography. IVUS measurements included lesion lumen area, external elastic membrane area, lesion plaque burden (calculated as external elastic membrane minus lumen area, divided by external elastic membrane, and multiplied by 100), and lumen area stenosis (calculated as reference lumen area minus lesion lumen area, divided by reference lumen area, multiplied by 100). Fifty-three coronary lesions were studied, with a mean percent diameter stenosis of 34.9 +/- 7.9% on angiography. Myocardial perfusion defects were demonstrated by single-photon emission computed tomography in 11 patients (12 myocardial regions) with no differences in lesion percent diameter stenosis compared with those without perfusion defects. The presence of reversible perfusion defects was associated with a higher lesion plaque burden as evaluated by IVUS (67.4 +/- 8.1% vs 60.2 +/- 9.3%, p = 0.01). FFR values did not differ in the presence or absence of perfusion defects (0.90 +/- 0.06 vs 0.92 +/- 0.07, respectively; p = NS). In conclusion, plaque burden as determined by IVUS may partly explain the presence of myocardial perfusion defects in cases of angiographically nonsignificant coronary lesions. However, the high FFR values associated with these lesions suggest that other mechanisms, such as endothelial/microvascular dysfunction, might also account for perfusion abnormalities in these patients.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 12/2005; 96(12):1621-6. · 3.21 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Nuclear Cardiology 02/2005; 12(2):S16-S17. · 2.85 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Nuclear Cardiology 01/2005; 12(2). · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and extent of the myocardium at risk using polar maps obtained with myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial perfusion of territories irrigated by the left anterior descending (LAD), right coronary (RCA) and left circumflex artery (CX) was studied with the help of a technetium-radiolabeled tracer during occlusion of the vessels in the course of percutaneous coronary angioplasty. We studied 50 patients (24 LAD, 15 RCA and 11 CX). The 99mTc compound was injected immediately after inflation of the balloon, and the artery was occluded for approximately 90 seconds. Tomographic images were acquired, and polar maps showing the extent of the ischemic region (uptake < 50% of maximum) were generated. Mean percentage extent of the ischemic territory was 49.8 +/- 10.3% (minimum 35%, maximum 67%), for the proximal LAD, 39.8 (8.3%) (minimum 20%, maximum 51%) for the mid LAD, 20.3 (7.6%) (minimum 8.3%, maximum 35%) for the RCA, and 21.3 (10.8%) (minimum 10.2%, maximum 30%) for the CX. The contours and extent of the jeopardized myocardial territory found during coronary occlusion allowed us to generate polar maps that illustrated actual coronary risk. The distribution and extent of the areas at risk differed from those in polar maps generated by most current applications used with myocardial perfusion SPECT.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 07/2004; 57(7):635-43. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effusive-constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon pericardial syndrome characterized by concomitant tamponade, caused by tense pericardial effusion, and constriction, caused by the visceral pericardium. We conducted a prospective study of its clinical evolution and management. From 1986 through 2001, all patients with effusive-constrictive pericarditis were prospectively evaluated. Combined pericardiocentesis and cardiac catheterization were performed in all patients, and pericardiectomy was performed in those with persistent constriction. Follow-up ranged from 1 month to 15 years (median, 7 years). A total of 1184 patients with pericarditis were evaluated, 218 of whom had tamponade. Of these 218, 190 underwent combined pericardiocentesis and catheterization. Fifteen of these patients had effusive-constrictive pericarditis and were included in the study. All patients presented with clinical tamponade; however, concomitant constriction was recognized in only seven patients. At catheterization, all patients had elevated intrapericardial pressure (median, 12 mm Hg; interquartile range, 7 to 18) and elevated right atrial and end-diastolic right and left ventricular pressures. After pericardiocentesis, the intrapericardial pressure decreased (median value, -5 mm Hg; interquartile range, -5 to 0), whereas right atrial and end-diastolic right and left ventricular pressures, although slightly reduced, remained elevated, with a dip-plateau morphology. The causes were diverse, and death was mainly related to the underlying disease. Pericardiectomy was required in seven patients, all of whom had involvement of the visceral pericardium. Three patients had spontaneous resolution. Effusive-constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon pericardial syndrome that may be missed in some patients who present with tamponade. Although evolution to persistent constriction is frequent, idiopathic cases may resolve spontaneously. In our opinion, extensive epicardiectomy is the procedure of choice in patients requiring surgery.
    New England Journal of Medicine 02/2004; 350(5):469-75. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introducción y objetivos. Analizar la extensión y distribución del miocardio en riesgo en los mapas polares de la tomografía computarizada por emisión de fotones simples (SPECT) de perfusión miocárdica correspondientes a las arterias descendente anterior (DA), coronaria derecha (CD) y circunfleja (CX), obtenidos mediante la inyección de un radiotrazador tecneciado durante su oclusión en el curso de una angioplastia. Pacientes y método. Se estudió a 50 pacientes (24 de la DA, 15 de la CD y 11 de la CX) a los que, inmediatamente después del inicio del inflado del globo de angioplastia, se inyectó por vía intravenosa un compuesto tecneciado manteniendo ocluida la arteria durante unos 90 s. Posteriormente, se procedió a captar los mapas polares con la distribución y extensión de la zona isquémica (captación < 50% respecto a la máxima). Resultados. El porcentaje de extensión media del territorio isquémico con relación a todo el ventrículo izquierdo durante las oclusiones de la DA proximal fue del 49,8 ± 10,3% (mínimo 35%, máximo 67%); para la DA media, del 39,8 ± 8,3% (mínimo 20%, máximo 51%); para la CD, del 20,3 ± 7,6% (mínimo 8,3%, máximo 35%), y para la CX, del 21,3 ± 10,8% (mínimo 10,2%, máximo 30%). Conclusiones. Los contornos y la extensión de la isquemia obtenidos en los mapas polares durante la oclusión de las arterias coronarias permiten definir el área en riesgo real de cada arteria con una distribución y extensión diferentes de las de los mapas polares clásicos utilizados habitualmente en la mayoría de los programas de cuantificación del SPECT de perfusión miocárdica.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 01/2004; · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the structural and functional characteristics of pulmonary arteries by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in the setting of primary pulmonary hypertension, and to correlate the ultrasound findings with haemodynamic variables and mortality at follow up. Prospective observational study. University hospital (tertiary referral centre). 20 consecutive patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (16 female; mean (SD) age, 39 (14) years). Cardiac catheterisation and simultaneous IVUS of pulmonary artery branches at baseline and after infusion of epoprostenol. 33 pulmonary arteries with a mean diameter of 3.91 (0.80) mm were imaged, and wall thickening was observed in all cases, 64% being eccentric. Mean wall thickness was 0.37 (0.13) mm, percentage wall area 31.0 (9.3)%, pulsatility 14.6 (4.8)%, and pulmonary/elastic strain index 449 (174) mm Hg. No correlation was observed between IVUS findings and haemodynamic variables. Epoprostenol infusion increased pulsatility by 53% and decreased the pulmonary/elastic strain index by 41% (p = 0.0001), irrespective of haemodynamic changes. At 18 (12) months follow up, nine patients had died. A reduced pulsatility and an increased pulmonary/elastic strain index were associated with increased mortality at follow up (12.0 (4.4)% v 16.4 (4.4)%, p = 0.03; 369 (67) v 546 (216) mm Hg, p = 0.02). IVUS demonstrated pulmonary artery wall abnormalities in all patients with primary pulmonary hypertension, mostly eccentric. The severity of the changes did not correlate with haemodynamic variables, and epoprostenol improved pulmonary vessel stiffness. There was an association between impaired pulmonary artery functional state as determined by IVUS and mortality at follow up.
    Heart (British Cardiac Society) 04/2003; 89(3):311-5. · 5.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A high number (30%-50%) of reversible defects have been detected early after coronary balloon angioplasty. Inadequate luminal enlargement despite a good angiographic appearance has been suggested as a possible mechanism of these perfusion abnormalities, and some reports have shown better coronary flow reserve after coronary stent implantation than after balloon dilatation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of early ischemic defects detected by maximal exercise (plus dipyridamole) with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT after successful coronary angioplasty with stent implantation. A secondary objective was to determine the prognostic value of these early ischemic defects. Thirty patients without previous myocardial infarction who successfully underwent 1-vessel coronary angioplasty with stent implantation were studied. Maximal-exercise (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial SPECT, with simultaneous dipyridamole if exercise was suboptimal, was performed at 6 +/- 1 d (mean +/- SD) after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. At 8 +/- 3 mo, all patients were followed up clinically, and 77% of them underwent follow-up angiography. The percentage of stenosis decreased from 68.5% +/- 12.6% of luminal diameter to 9.3% +/- 8.8% after stent implantation, and minimal luminal diameter increased from 0.89 +/- 0.36 mm to 2.85 +/- 0.45 mm. Mild-to-moderate reversible myocardial defects in the territory of the dilated artery were detected in 5 patients (17%), with no angiographic or procedural differences occurring between them and patients without ischemic defects. At follow-up, the target lesion revascularization rates depending on the presence or absence of early ischemic defects were 40% and 8%, respectively (P = 0.18). Angiographic restenosis occurred in 3 of 4 patients who had early ischemic defects and underwent follow-up angiography and in 3 of 19 patients who had no early ischemic defects and underwent follow-up angiography (restenosis rate, 75% and 16%, respectively; P < 0.05). Coronary angioplasty with stent implantation is associated with a 17% rate of ischemic defects early after the procedure. Patients with early myocardial perfusion defects after coronary stent implantation had a high rate of restenosis.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine 12/2001; 42(12):1768-72. · 5.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although different Doppler methods have been validated for aortic regurgitation quantification, the benefit of combining information from different methods has not been defined. Our study included 2 phases. In the initial phase (60 patients), Doppler parameters (jet width, short-axis jet area, apical jet area, regurgitant fraction from pulmonary and mitral flow, and deceleration slope) were correlated with angiography; range values for each severity grade were defined and intraobserver and interobserver and intermachine variability were studied. In the validation phase (158 patients), defined value ranges were prospectively tested and a strategy based on considering as the definitive severity grade that in which the two best methods agreed was tested. Jet width had the best correlation with angiography (r = 0.91), and its ratio with the left ventricular outflow diameter did not improve the correlation (r = 0.85) and decreased reproducibility. Apical jet area and regurgitant fraction from pulmonary flow permitted acceptable quantification (r = 0.87 and 0.86, respectively) but with worse reproducibility. The other methods were not assessable in 20% to 30% of studies. Concordance with angiography decreased in jet width when the jet was eccentric (90% vs 77%, P <.01), in apical jet area when mitral valve disease was present (84% vs 65%, P <.02), and in short-axis jet area and regurgitant fraction from pulmonary flow with concomitant aortic stenosis (77% vs 44%, P <.002 and 77% vs 53%, P <.02, respectively). Agreement with angiography was very high (94 [95%] of 99) when severity grade coincided in both jet width and apical jet area. In 59 cases without concordance, regurgitant fraction from pulmonary flow was used as a third method. Overall, this strategy permitted concordance with angiography in 146 patients (92%). Jet width is the best predictor in aortic regurgitation quantification by Doppler echocardiography. However, better results were obtained when a strategy based on concordance between jet width and another Doppler method was established, particularly when the jet was eccentric.
    American Heart Journal 06/2000; 139(5):773-81. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A large idiopathic chronic pericardial effusion can be defined as a collection of pericardial fluid that persists for more than three months and has no apparent cause. We conducted a prospective study of the natural history and treatment of this disorder. Between 1977 and 1992, we prospectively evaluated and enrolled patients with large idiopathic chronic pericardial effusion. We performed pericardiocentesis in most of the patients. We performed pericardiectomy when large pericardial effusion reappeared after pericardiocentesis. Follow-up ranged from 18 months to 20 years (median, 7 years). During the study period, we evaluated a total of 1108 patients with pericarditis, 461 of whom had large pericardial effusion. Twenty-eight of these patients (age range, 7 to 85 years; median, 61) had large idiopathic chronic effusion and were included in the study. The duration of effusion ranged from 6 months to 15 years (median, 3 years). At the initial evaluation, 13 patients were asymptomatic. Overt tamponade was found in eight patients (29 percent). Therapeutic pericardiocentesis, performed in 24 patients, was followed by the disappearance of or marked reduction in the effusion in 8. Five of the 24 patients underwent early pericardiectomy, and in 11 large pericardial effusion reappeared. Cardiac catheterization, performed in 16 patients, showed elevated intrapericardial pressure (4.75+/-3.79 mm Hg) and reduced transmural pressure (1.0+/-2.50 mm Hg) before pericardiocentesis. Both of these abnormalities in pressure improved significantly after pericardiocentesis. Pericardiectomy, performed in 20 patients, yielded excellent long-term results. At the end of the follow-up period, 10 patients had died, but none had died from pericardial disease. Large idiopathic chronic pericardial effusion is well tolerated for long periods in most patients, but severe tamponade can develop unexpectedly at any time. Pericardiocentesis alone frequently results in the resolution of large effusions, but recurrence is common and pericardiectomy should be considered whenever a large effusion recurs after pericardiocentesis.
    New England Journal of Medicine 12/1999; 341(27):2054-9. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a patient with refractory angina in the postoperative period of a coronary artery bypass grafting. Ischemia was due to a large side branch of the left internal mammary artery causing steal phenomenon that was treated with transcatheter coil embolization.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 12/1998; 51(11):915-7. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the efficacy of single photon emission tomography (SPET) with 99mTc-compounds for the diagnosis of restenosis of previous percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Seventy-one patients (16 women, median age: 60 years, 35 with multivessel disease, 78 arteries with PTCA) with previous PTCA and with coronary angiography performed after scintigraphy were studied. 99mTc-SPET exercise (53 with MIBI and 18 with tetrofosmin) was performed, for clinical reasons, to all patients between one month and 4 years after PTCA. Intravenous dipyridamole was administered simultaneously to 16 patients who had insufficient exercise. SPET sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values and global values were all significantly higher than those obtained with exercise tests (80% vs 63%; p = 0.05; 83% vs 37%; p = 0.001; 91% vs 69%; p = 0.007; 64% vs 31%; p = 0.009, and 81% vs 55%; p = 0.0006, respectively). These results were significantly superior in patients with one vessel disease than in patients with multivessel disease. SPET exercise with 99mTc-compounds is a test with a high efficacy for the diagnosis of post-PTCA restenosis, mainly in patients with one vessel disease.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 09/1998; 51(8):648-54. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • Revista Espa de Cardiologia 01/1998; 51(11). · 3.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

484 Citations
297.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006
    • Autonomous University of Barcelona
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1987–2006
    • University Hospital Vall d'Hebron
      • • Department of Cardiology
      • • Departamento de Medicina
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005
    • Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain