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Publications (2)0.29 Total impact

  • Source
    R Louise Floyd · Mary Kate Weber · Clark Denny · Mary J O'Connor
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol use among women of childbearing age is a leading, preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities in the United States. Although most women reduce their alcohol use upon pregnancy recognition, some women report drinking during pregnancy and others may continue to drink prior to realizing they are pregnant. These findings emphasize the need for effective prevention strategies for both pregnant and nonpregnant women who might be at risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP). This report reviews evidence supporting alcohol screening and brief intervention as an effective approach to reducing problem drinking and AEPs that can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In addition, this article highlights a recent report of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect that describes effective interventions to reduce alcohol use and AEPs, and outlines recommendations on promoting and improving these strategies. Utilizing evidence-based alcohol screening tools and brief counseling for women at risk for an AEP and other effective population-based strategies can help achieve future alcohol-free pregnancies.
    Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews 01/2009; 15(3):193-9. DOI:10.1002/ddrr.75 · 0.29 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Jacquelyn Bertrand · Louise L Floyd · Mary Kate Weber
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    ABSTRACT: Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) results from maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and carries lifelong consequences. Early recognition of FAS can result in better outcomes for persons who receive a diagnosis. Although FAS was first identified in 1973, persons with this condition often do not receive a diagnosis. In 2002, Congress directed CDC to update and refine diagnostic and referral criteria for FAS, incorporating recent scientific and clinical evidence. In 2002, CDC convened a scientific working group (SWG) of persons with expertise in FAS research, diagnosis, and treatment to draft criteria for diagnosing FAS. This report summarizes the diagnostic guidelines drafted by the SWG, provides recommendations for when and how to refer a person suspected of having problems related to prenatal alcohol exposure, and assesses existing practices for creating supportive environments that might prevent long-term adverse consequences associated with FAS. The guidelines were created on the basis of a review of scientific evidence, clinical expertise, and the experiences of families affected by FAS regarding the physical and neuropsychologic features of FAS and the medical, educational, and social services needed by persons with FAS and their families. The guidelines are intended to facilitate early identification of persons affected by prenatal exposure to alcohol so they and their families can receive services that enable them to achieve healthy lives and reach their full potential. This report also includes recommendations to enhance identification of and intervention for women at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Additional data are needed to develop diagnostic criteria for other related disorders (e.g., alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder).
    MMWR. Recommendations and reports: Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control 11/2005; 54(RR-11):1-14.
  • Source
    Mary Kate Weber · R Louise Floyd · Edward P Riley · Dixie E Snider
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to serious birth defects and developmental disabilities. A need exists to develop effective strategies for both children with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or other prenatal alcohol-related effects and for women at high risk for having an alcohol-exposed pregnancy. Since the syndrome was identified approximately 30 years ago, advancements have been made in FAS diagnostics, surveillance, prevention, and intervention, but a substantial amount of work remains. Collaborations among partners in federal state, and local agencies, academia, clinical professions, school systems, and families are critical to developing and implementing successful efforts related to FAS and fetal alcohol effect (FAE). In 1999, Congress directed the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to convene the National Task Force on FAS and FAE (the Task Force). CDC's National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Prevention Team, coordinates the Task Force and manages its operation. Since the Task Force was chartered in 2000, Task Force members, with input from multiple partners, have convened to deliberate and determine the Task Force mission, goals, and priority concerns to be addressed. This report describes the structure, function, mission, and goals of the Task Force and provides their first recommendations. An explanation of how the Task Force recommendations were generated and the Task Forces next steps are also reported.
    MMWR. Recommendations and reports: Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control 10/2002; 51(RR-14):9-12.