L García-Eroles

Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (54)156.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background and objectives Cardiovascular risk factors, clinical features and early outcome of first-ever primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PIH) from 1986 to 2004 using the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry were assessed, and compared with data from patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. Patients and methods The study population consisted of 380 patients with PIH and 2,082 patients with ischemic stroke. Secular trends for the periods 1986-1992, 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 were analyzed. Results Age increased significantly (P < .001) throughout the 3 study periods and there was a significant increase in the percentage of patients with atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lobar topography. The use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also increased significantly throughout the study periods. In comparison with ischemic stroke in-hospital death was more frequent (28,2 vs. 12%) and lacunar syndrome (9,5 vs. 31,4%) and symptom-free patients at discharge were less frequent in the intracerebral haemorrhage group (6,1 vs. 18,3%). Conclusions Significant changes over a 19-year period included an increase in the patient's age, frequency of COPD and atrial fibrillation and use of MRI imaging studies. PIH is a severe subtype of stroke with a higher risk of early death and lower asymptomatic frequency at discharge than ischemic cerebral infarct.
    Medicina Clínica. 01/2014; 142(1):1–6.
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    ABSTRACT: There are few studies analyzing features of ischemic stroke subtypes in women. We assessed gender differences in lacunar stroke subtype based on data collected from a prospective stroke registry in Barcelona, Spain. Lacunar ischemic stroke was diagnosed in 310 (8.1 %) women and 423 (11.1 %) men of a total of 3,808 consecutive stroke patients included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry, in Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain), over a period of 19 years. Independent factors for lacunar stroke in women were assessed by multivariate analysis. Women accounted for 42 % of all lacunar stroke patients (n = 733) in the registry and 11.4 % of all patients with ischemic stroke (n = 2,704). Very old age (85 years or older) was found in 20.3 % in women versus 11.1 % in men (P < 0.0001). In the logistic regression analysis, obesity [odds ratio (OR) = 4.24], prolonged hospital stay (>12 days) (OR = 1.59), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.50), and age (OR = 1.06) were significant variables independently associated with lacunar stoke in women, whereas peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.51), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR = 0.46), renal dysfunction (OR = 0.13), and heavy smoking (OR = 0.04) were independent variables for lacunar stroke in men. Women with lacunar stroke were remarkably older and presented with obesity and hypertension more frequently than did men. Lacunar stroke severity was similar in men and women. These findings in lacunar stroke patients could be explained by differences in gender for ischemic stroke in general.
    Acta neurologica Belgica. 11/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cardiovascular risk factors, clinical features and early outcome of first-ever primary intracerebral haemorrhage (PIH) from 1986 to 2004 using the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry were assessed, and compared with data from patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 380 patients with PIH and 2,082 patients with ischemic stroke. Secular trends for the periods 1986-1992, 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 were analyzed. RESULTS: Age increased significantly (P<.001) throughout the 3 study periods and there was a significant increase in the percentage of patients with atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lobar topography. The use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also increased significantly throughout the study periods. In comparison with ischemic stroke in-hospital death was more frequent (28,2 vs. 12%) and lacunar syndrome (9,5 vs. 31,4%) and symptom-free patients at discharge were less frequent in the intracerebral haemorrhage group (6,1 vs. 18,3%). CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes over a 19-year period included an increase in the patient's age, frequency of COPD and atrial fibrillation and use of MRI imaging studies. PIH is a severe subtype of stroke with a higher risk of early death and lower asymptomatic frequency at discharge than ischemic cerebral infarct.
    Medicina Clínica 06/2013; · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJETIVE: To characterize the clinical factors and prognosis and identify determinants of hemorrhage recurrence (HCR) in patients with acute non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Stroke patterns were studied in 28 consecutive recurrent non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage patients admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona for a 19 year period. Demographic, risk factors, clinical, neuroimaging and outcome variables were analyzed and compared with patients with first-ever non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (n=380) to identify predictors of hemorrhage recurrence. Significant variables were entered into a multivariate logistic regression analysis. HCR accounted for 6.8% of all patients with acute consecutive non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhages. The HCR were mostly lobar (67.9%). Other topographies include: thalamus (10.7%), capsule-ganglionar (7.1%), intraventricular (3.6%) and multiple topographies (10.7%). Although the HCR have poor prognosis, it is not worse compared to the first-ever intracerebral hemorrhages, both at the high hospital mortality (17.9 vs. 28.2%) as the low frequency of absence of limitation at discharge (3.6 vs. 6.1%). The clinical profile significantly associated with HCR was: valvular heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 5.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.45-19.47), lobar topography (OR 3.53, 95% IC 1.53-8.13), and the presence of nausea and vomiting (OR 2.43, 95% IC 1.06-5.52). HCR constitute less than one tenth of non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhages and are most commonly located in the brain lobes. Although the prognosis is serious, this is no worse during the acute phase, than of the first-ever non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinical profiles were different in recurrent non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage patients when compared to first-ever non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage patients.
    Medicina Clínica 07/2012; 139(12):538-41. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this single-center prospective study was to assess the presence of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) and CSR-related variables in 68 consecutive patients with radiologically proven first-ever lacunar stroke undergoing a respiratory sleep study using a portable respiratory polygraph within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. CSR was diagnosed in 14 patients (20.6%). Patients with CSR as compared with those without CSR showed a significantly higher mean (standard deviation, SD) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (34.9 (21.7) versus 18.5 (14.4), = 0.001) and central apnea index (13.1 (13.8) versus 1.8 (3.4), = 0.0001) as well as higher scores of the Barthel index and the Canadian Neurological scale as a measure of stroke severity, and longer hospital stay. CSR was present in one of each five patients with lacunar stroke. The presence of CSR was associated with a trend towards a higher functional stroke severity and worse prognosis.
    Sleep disorders. 01/2012; 2012:257890.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess changing trends in clinical characteristics and early outcome of patients with acute cardioembolic stroke (ACS) over a 19-year period. Data of 575 patients with first-ever ACS included in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry were analyzed. Changing trends for 1986-1992, 1993-1998, and 1999-2004 periods were compared. A statistically significant increase (P < 0.001) in the age of patients (74.6 years in 1986-1992 vs. 81.4 years in 1999-2004) and the percentage of patients older than 85 years of age (16% vs. 38.2%) was observed. Patients with hypertension increased from 40.5 to 60.8% (P = 0.001) as were patients with diabetes, chronic bronchitis, and obesity (P = NS). The median length of hospital stay decreased from 18 to 12 days (P = 0.031) and prolonged hospital stay (>12 days) from 18.3 to 13.1 (P = 0.033). In-hospital death rate remained around 20%. ACS continues to be a severe ischemic stroke subtype with high risk of in-hospital death. The lack of improvement in the early prognosis over a 19-year period may be explained by an increase in the prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factors and progressive aging of the population.
    Neurology India 01/2012; 60(3):288-93. · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients.
    ISRN neurology. 01/2012; 2012:498303.
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: Ischemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been studied as extensively as infarctions in other vascular territories. This single centre, retrospective clinical study was conducted a) to describe salient characteristics of stroke patients with PCA infarction, b) to compare data of these patients with those with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infarctions, and c) to identify predictors of PCA stroke. A total of 232 patients with PCA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 232 patients with PCA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 51 patients with ACA infarctions included in the registry.Infarctions of the PCA accounted for 6.8% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 9.6% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Lacunar infarction was the most frequent stroke subtype (34.5%) followed by atherothrombotic infarction (29.3%) and cardioembolic infarction (21.6%). In-hospital mortality was 3.9% (n = 9). Forty-five patients (19.4%) were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Hemianopia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.43), lacunar stroke subtype (OR = 2.18), symptom-free at discharge (OR = 1.92), limb weakness (OR = 0.10), speech disorders (OR = 0.33) and cardioembolism (OR = 0.65) were independent variables of PCA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas sensory deficit (OR = 2.36), limb weakness (OR = 0.11) and cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 0.43) were independent variables associated with PCA stroke in comparison with ACA infarction. Lacunar stroke is the main subtype of infarction occurring in the PCA territory. Several clinical features are more frequent in stroke patients with PCA infarction than in patients with ischaemic stroke due to infarction in the MCA and ACA territories. In-hospital mortality in patients with PCA territory is low.
    BMC Research Notes 09/2011; 4:329.
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    ABSTRACT: To characterize the clinical factors and prognosis and identify determinants of ischemic stroke recurrence in acute stroke. Recurrent stroke patterns were studied in 605 consecutive patients admitted with a second or further ischemic stroke to the Department of Neurology of the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona over a 17 year period. Demographic, risk factors, clinical, neuroimaging and outcome variables were analyzed and compared with patients with first-ever cerebral infarction (n=2.099) to identify predictors of ischemic recurrent stroke. Significant variables were entered into a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Ischemic recurrent strokes accounted for 22.4% of all acute consecutive ischemic strokes. Frequency of ischemic stroke recurrence were significantly different among ischemic stroke subtypes: 26.2% in atherothrombotic, 24.4% in cardioembolic, 21.8% in lacunar stroke, 15.8% in infarcts of unusual etiology and 12% infarctions of uncertain etiology. The overall in-hospital mortality and symptom free at discharge in recurrent vs. non-recurrent stroke patients rate was 16.2 vs. 12% (p=0.005) and 17.8 vs. 27.3% (p=0.0001) respectively. Previous intracerebral hemorrhage (OR=3.07; 95% CI, 1.51-6.25), intermittent claudication (OR=1.39; 95% CI, 1.01-1.90), arterial hypertension (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.09-1.59), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.26; 95% CI, 1.02-1.56), age (OR=1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03), female gender (OR=0.63; 95% CI, 0.52-0.77), headache (OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.44-0.87) and bulbar topography (OR=0.21; 95% CI, 0.05-0.89) were independent clinical variables related to ischemic stroke recurrence. About one in every four patients with ischemic stroke had an ischemic stroke recurrence. In-hospital mortality is 16.2% and clinical profiles were different in ischemic stroke recurrence when compared to first-ever ischemic stroke patients.
    Medicina Clínica 03/2011; 137(12):541-5. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with middle cerebral artery infarcts (MCAI). Data from 1.355 patients with MCAI were obtained from consecutive strokes included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry". Demographic, clinical, neuroimaging and outcome variables in the subgroup of patients who died were compared with those in the surviving subgroup. The independent predictive value of each variable on the development of death was assessed with a logistic regression analysis. Two predictive models were constructed. A first model was based on demographic, risk factors and clinical variables (total 14 variables). A second model was based on demographic, risk factors, clinical and outcome variables (total 20). In-hospital death was observed in 235 patients (17.3%). Early seizures (OR=4.49; CI 95%: 1.77-11.40), 85 years old or more (OR=2.61; CI 95%: 1.88-2.60), atrial fibrillation (OR=2.57; CI 95%: 1.89-3.49), limb weakness (OR=2.55; CI 95%: 1.40-4.66), cardiac heart disease (OR=2.33; CI 95%: 1.43-3.80) and sensory symptoms (OR=2.29; CI 95%: 1.68-3.12) appeared to be independent prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in the first predictive model. In addition to these variables, cardiac complications (OR=5.50: CI 95%: 3.21-9.40), peripheral vascular complications (OR=3.74; CI 95%: 1.58-8.85), previous cerebral infarct (OR=1.89: CI 95%: 1.27-2.80), infections (OR=1.82; CI 95%; 1.27-2.61), and lacunar infarcts (OR=0.02; CI 95%: 0.01-0.17), appeared to be independent prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality in the second model. Clinical features easily obtained at the patient's bedside help clinicians to predict in-hospital mortality in patients with MCAI. Early seizures and age 85 years old or more, were the main clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality.
    Medicina Clínica 06/2010; 135(3):109-14. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data from different studies suggest a favourable association between pretreatment with statins or hypercholesterolemia and outcome after ischaemic stroke. We examined whether there were differences in in-hospital mortality according to the presence or absence of statin therapy in a large population of first-ever ischaemic stroke patients and assessed the influence of statins upon early death and spontaneous neurological recovery. In 2,082 consecutive patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry during a period of 19 years (1986-2004), statin use or hypercholesterolemia before stroke was documented in 381 patients. On the other hand, favourable outcome defined as grades 0-2 in the modified Rankin scale was recorded in 382 patients. Early outcome was better in the presence of statin therapy or hypercholesterolemia (cholesterol levels were not measured) with significant differences between the groups with and without pretreatment with statins in in-hospital mortality (6% vs 13.3%, P = 0.001) and symptom-free (22% vs 17.5%, P = 0.025) and severe functional limitation (6.6% vs 11.5%, P = 0.002) at hospital discharge, as well as lower rates of infectious respiratory complications during hospitalization. In the logistic regression model, statin therapy was the only variable inversely associated with in-hospital death (odds ratio 0.57) and directly associated with favourable outcome (odds ratio 1.32). Use of statins or hypercholesterolemia before first-ever ischaemic stroke was associated with better early outcome with a reduced mortality during hospitalization and neurological disability at hospital discharge. However, statin therapy may increase the risk of intracerebral haemorrhage, particularly in the setting of thrombolysis.
    BMC Neurology 01/2010; 10:47. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular risk factors, clinical features and early outcome of first-ever cerebral lacunar infarcts from 1986 to 2004, using the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry, were assessed and compared with data from patients with nonlacunar infarction. The study population consisted of 566 patients with lacunar infarct and 1,516 patients with nonlacunar infarct. Secular trends for the periods 1986-1992, 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 were analyzed. Age and the percentage of very old patients (≥85 years old) increased significantly (p < 0.001) throughout the time period. There was a significant decrease in the percentage of patients with hypertension, but the percentage of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased. The use of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also increased significantly. The median length of hospital stay decreased significantly. Significant changes over a 19-year period included an increase in the patients' age, frequency of very old patients (≥85 years old) and use of MRI studies, whereas the frequency of hypertension and length of hospital stay decreased.
    Neuroepidemiology 01/2010; 35(3):231-6. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and objectivesTo determine clinical predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with middle cerebral artery infarcts (MCAI).
    Medicina Clinica - MED CLIN. 01/2010; 135(3):109-114.
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    ABSTRACT: Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct is poorly characterised. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct and to identify clinical predictors of this variant of lacunar stroke. A total of 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct were compared with those of the 733 patients with lacunar infarction. Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct accounted for 16.6% (146/879) of all cases of lacunar stroke. Subtypes of lacunar syndromes included pure motor stroke in 63 patients, sensorimotor stroke in 51, pure sensory stroke in 14, atypical lacunar syndrome in 9, ataxic hemiparesis in 5 and dysarthria-clumsy hand in 4. Valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, sudden onset, limb weakness and sensory symptoms were significantly more frequent among patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct than in those with lacunar infarction, whereas diabetes was less frequent. In the multivariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (OR = 4.62), sensorimotor stroke (OR = 4.05), limb weakness (OR = 2.09), sudden onset (OR = 2.06) and age (OR = 0.96) were independent predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct. Although lacunar syndromes are highly suggestive of small deep cerebral infarctions, lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts are found in 16.6% of cases. The presence of sensorimotor stroke, limb weakness and sudden onset in a patient with atrial fibrillation should alert the clinician to the possibility of a lacunar syndrome not due to a lacunar infarct.
    BMC Neurology 01/2010; 10:31. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose was to examine the occurrence of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) and variables related to SRBD in patients with acute lacunar stroke. In 68 consecutive patients with radiologically proven lacunes, respiratory polygraphy within the first 48 h of stroke onset was performed. SRBDs were classified according to mutually exclusive cutoff values of the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) as mild (AHI ≥ 10), moderate (AHI ≥ 20), and severe (AHI ≥ 30). Variables independently associated with SRBDs were assessed by logistic regression analysis. The mean (standard deviation) AHI was 21.9 (17.4). A total of 69.1% of patients showed AHI ≥ 10, 44.1% AHI ≥ 20, and 25% AHI ≥ 30. Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) was present in 20.6% of patients. Smoking (>20 cigarettes/day) or location of lacunes in the internal capsule or the pons was significantly more frequent in the AHI ≥ 10 group than in the remaining AHI groups (80.9% vs. 57.1%, P = 0.041). AHI ≥ 20 and AHI ≥ 30 occurred more frequently in smokers or in capsular or pontine lacunes than in the remaining patients (20% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.053; 29.4% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.01, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, smoking or capsular or pontine topographies were associated with AHI ≥ 10 [odds ratio (OR) = 3.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02–9.79; P = 0.045]. Lacunes in the internal capsule or the pons in smokers were associated with AHI ≥ 20 (OR = 9.25, 95% CI 1.05–81.70; P = 0.045). Smoking (OR = 19.64, 95% CI 1.68–229.85; P = 0.010) and body mass index (OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.13–2.50; P = 0.010) were associated with AHI ≥ 30. Smoker patients with capsular or pontine acute lacunar stroke should be screened for SRDB.
    Journal of Neurology 08/2009; 256(12):2036-42. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about clinical features and prognosis of patients with ischaemic stroke caused by infarction in the territory of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the clinical characteristics and short-term outcome of stroke patients with ACA infarction as compared with that of patients with ischaemic stroke due to middle cerebral artery (MCA) and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) infarctions, and b) to identify predictors of ACA stroke. Fifty-one patients with ACA stroke were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004). Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 51 patients with ACA stroke were compared with those of the 1355 patients with MCA infarctions and 232 patients with PCA infarctions included in the registry. Infarctions of the ACA accounted for 1.3% of all cases of stroke (n = 3808) and 1.8% of cerebral infarctions (n = 2704). Stroke subtypes included cardioembolic infarction in 45.1% of patients, atherothrombotic infarction in 29.4%, lacunar infarct in 11.8%, infarct of unknown cause in 11.8% and infarction of unusual aetiology in 2%. In-hospital mortality was 7.8% (n = 4). Only 5 (9.8%) patients were symptom-free at hospital discharge. Speech disturbances (odds ratio [OR] = 0.48) and altered consciousness (OR = 0.31) were independent variables of ACA stroke in comparison with MCA infarction, whereas limb weakness (OR = 9.11), cardioembolism as stroke mechanism (OR = 2.49) and sensory deficit (OR = 0.35) were independent variables associated with ACA stroke in comparison with PCA infarction. Cardioembolism is the main cause of brain infarction in the territory of the ACA. Several clinical features are more frequent in stroke patients with ACA infarction than in patients with ischaemic stroke due to infarction in the MCA and PCA territories.
    BMC Neurology 02/2009; 9:30. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prospective stroke registries allow analyzing important aspects of the natural history of acute cerebrovascular events. Using the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry, we aimed to determine trends in risk factors, stroke subtypes, prognosis and in-hospital mortality over 19 years in hospitalized stroke patients. The study population consisted of 2,416 first-ever stroke patients (ischemic stroke, n = 2,028; intracerebral hemorrhage, n = 334) included in the stroke registry up to December 31, 2004. Temporal trends in stroke patient characteristics for the periods 1986-1992, 1993-1998 and 1999-2004 were assessed. Age was significantly different among the analyzed periods (p < 0.001), showing an increment in older patients throughout time. Hypertension (p = 0.001), diabetes (p = 0.004), ischemic heart disease (p = 0.002) and atrial fibrillation increased (p = 0.000) as opposed to heavy smoking (p = 0.000) and history of TIA (p = 0.025). The mortality rate and the length of hospital stay decreased (p = 0.001), whereas transfer to convalescent/rehabilitation units increased (p = 0.001). An improvement in acute-stroke management and possibly evolution of cerebrovascular risk factors is reflected by changes in the risk factors and outcome of first-ever stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit over a 19-year time span.
    Cerebrovascular Diseases 09/2008; 26(5):509-16. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    A Arboix, A Font, C Garro, L García-Eroles, E Comes, J Massons
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    ABSTRACT: To determine clinical variables related to recurrent lacunar infarction following a previous lacunar stroke. A total of 122 out of 733 consecutive patients with lacunar infarction collected from a hospital based registry between 1986 and 2004 were readmitted because of a recurrent lacunar infarction. In a subset of 59 patients, cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Predictors of lacunar infarction recurrence were assessed by logistic regression analysis. First lacunar infarction recurrence occurred in 101 patients (83%) and multiple recurrences in 21. The mean time between first ever lacunar infarction and recurrent lacunes was 58.3 months (range 2-240). In the subset of 59 patients in whom cognition was studied, cognitive impairment, defined as an MMSE score <24, was detected in 16% (8/49) of patients with first lacunar infarction recurrence and in 40% (4/10) of those with multiple lacunar infarction recurrences. In the multivariate analysis, hypertension (odds ratio 2.01, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.30) and diabetes (odds ratio 1.62, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.46) were significant predictors of lacunar stroke recurrence, whereas hyperlipidaemia was inversely associated (odds ratio 0.52, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.90). Hypertension and diabetes were significant factors related to recurrent lacunar infarction. Hyperlipidaemia appeared to have a protective role. Cognitive impairment was a frequent finding in patients with multiple lacunar infarction recurrences.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 01/2008; 78(12):1392-4. · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • A Arboix, L García-Eroles, J Massons, M Oliveres, M Balcells
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the clinical characteristics of haemorrhagic pure motor stroke (PMS). Twelve patients with haemorrhagic PMS were identified. Haemorrhagic PMS accounted for 3.2% of all cases of pure motor hemiparesis (n = 380) and 3.3% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364) entered in the database. When compared with PMS of ischaemic origin, patients with haemorrhagic PMS were more likely to be younger (62.2 vs. 75.2 years, P = 0.003) and to have headache (33% vs. 6.3%, P =0.007) and thalamus involvement (25% vs. 2.4%, P = 0.005). Limb weakness (100% vs. 74.1%; P = 0.03), involvement of the internal capsule (50% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.012) and symptom free at discharge (25% vs. 3.7%, P = 0.012) were significantly more frequent in patients with haemorrhagic PMS than in the remaining cases of haemorrhagic stroke, whereas nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 25.9%, P = 0.03), altered consciousness (0% vs. 42.9%, P = 0.001), sensory symptoms (8.3% vs. 46.9%, P =0.007) and ventricular haemorrhage (0% vs. 26.1%, P = 0.028) were significantly less frequent. Haemorrhagic PMS is a very infrequent stroke subtype. Headache at stroke onset may be useful sign for distinguishing haemorrhagic PMS from other causes of lacunar stroke. There are important differences between haemorrhagic PMS and the remaining intracerebral haemorrhages.
    European Journal of Neurology 03/2007; 14(2):219-23. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420) and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364). Hypertension (53.2%), vascular malformations (6.4%), haematological conditions (4.3%) and anticoagulation (2.1%) were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9). Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56), intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74) and age (OR = 1.23), were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome.
    BMC Neurology 02/2007; 7:32. · 2.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
156.17 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1998–2013
    • Hospital Universitari Sagrat Cor
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol
      Badalona, Catalonia, Spain
    • Institut Català de la Salut
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2009–2011
    • Consorci Sanitari del Maresme
      Mataró, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005–2010
    • Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge
      l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2004–2006
    • University of Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain