Clara I Linares

University of Cordoba (Spain), Córdoba, Andalusia, Spain

Are you Clara I Linares?

Claim your profile

Publications (5)26.45 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Aims: The study evaluated the role of increased intracellular nitric oxide (NO) concentration using NO donors or stably NO synthase-3 (NOS-3) overexpression during CD95-dependent cell death in hepatoma cells. The expression of cell death receptors and caspase activation, RhoA kinase activity, NOS-3 expression/activity, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and p53 expression were analyzed. The antitumoral activity of NO was also evaluated in the subcutaneous implantation of NOS-3-overexpressing hepatoma cells, as well NO donor injection into wild-type hepatoma-derived tumors implanted in xenograft mouse models. Results: NO donor increased CD95 expression and activation of caspase-8 and 3 in HepG2, Huh7, and Hep3B cells. NOS-3 overexpression increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, p53 and CD95 expression, cellular Fas-associated death domain (FADD)-like IL-1beta converting enzyme (FLICE) inhibitory protein long (cFLIP(L)) and its short isoform (cFLIP(S)) shift, and cell death in HepG2 (4TO-NOS) cells. The inhibition of RhoA kinase and p53 knockdown using RNA interference reduced cell death in 4TO-NOS cells. The supplementation with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increased NOS-3 activity and cell death in 4TO-NOS cells. NOS-3 overexpression or NO donor injection into hepatoma-derived tumors reduced the size and increased p53 and cell death receptor expression in nude mice. Innovation and Conclusions: The increase of intracellular NO concentration promoted oxidative and nitrosative stress, Rho kinase activity, p53 and CD95 expression, and cell death in cultured hepatoma cells. NOS-3-overexpressed HepG2 cells or intratumoral NO donor administration reduced tumor cell growth and increased the expression of p53 and cell death receptors in tumors developed in a xenograft mouse model. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.
    Antioxidants & Redox Signaling 08/2012; · 8.20 Impact Factor
  • Gustavo Ferrín, Clara I Linares, Jordi Muntané
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival. Since cancer cells have frequently disrupted different cell death pathways that promote their survival, mitochondria may be key organelles to promote cell death in cancer cells. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis. While the first group includes drugs that act on glycolysis, β-oxidation, electron transport chain, mitochondrial permeability and the Bcl-2/IAP family protein, the second one consists of those drugs that cause cell death through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by promoting ROS generation or by modulating mitochondrial protein involved in apoptosis induction.
    Current pharmaceutical design 06/2011; 17(20):2002-16. · 4.41 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ca(2+) mobilization, nitric oxide (NO), and oxidative stress have been involved in cell death induced by hydrophobic bile acid in hepatocytes. The aim of the study was the elucidation of the effect of the antioxidant mitochondrial-driven ubiquinone (Mito Q) on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NO production, and cell death in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated HepG2 cells. The role of the regulation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by Ca(2+) chelators (EGTA or BAPTA-AM), agonist of Ca(2+) entrance (A23187) or NO (L-NAME or NO donor), was assessed during Mito Q cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. Cell death, NO synthase (NOS)-1, -2, and -3 expression, Ca(2+) mobilization, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and NOS-3 expression and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented and L-NAME enhanced GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca(2+) entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, reduced the expression of NOS-3 and enhanced cell death in control and GCDCA-treated cells. Mito Q prevented the reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, NOS-3 expression, NO production, and cell death in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The conclusion is that the recovery of Ca(2+)-dependent NOS-3 expression by Mito Q may be considered an additional cytoprotective property of an antioxidant.
    Chemical Research in Toxicology 12/2009; 22(12):1984-91. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca2+ on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca2+ pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca2+ entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca2+ mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca2+ concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and l-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca2+ entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca2+ entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca2+ concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca2+-dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.
    Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 10/2009; 242(2):165-72. · 3.98 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most commonly occurring cancer worldwide. The expression of p27 has been related to reduced severity of tumor grade and recurrence of HCC. The study assessed the role of p27 on the cell proliferation and death, and DNA mutagenesis in experimental genotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB(1)) in cultured hepatocytes obtained from control and p27(Kip1) deficient mice. The overexpression of p27 was assessed with wild type p27(Kip1) expression vector in HepG2 cells. The expression of p27, p21 and p53 was assessed in well and poorly-differentiated liver tumors. DNA damage and cell death induced by AFB(1) were related to a reduction of p27 and p21 expression in cultured hepatocytes. AFB(1)-induced nuclear phosphorylated (Ser 10) p27 degradation was related to a rise of nuclear KIST, Rsk-1 and Rsk-2 expression and cytoplasm phosphorylated (Thr 198) p27 expression. The overexpression of p27 reduced cell proliferation, cell death and DNA damage in AFB(1)-treated hepatocytes. The enhanced survival of patients with well differentiated compared to poorly-differentiated tumors was related to high expression of p27, p21 and p53 in liver sections. The study showed that the p27 reduced cell proliferation and death, as well as the accumulation of DNA damage in hepatocarcinogenesis.
    International Journal of Cancer 07/2009; 125(10):2270-80. · 6.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

14 Citations
26.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Cordoba (Spain)
      • Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular
      Córdoba, Andalusia, Spain
  • 2011
    • Instituto Maimónides de Investigación Biomédica de Córdoba
      Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain
  • 2009
    • Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía
      Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain