Oliver Bieri

Universitätsspital Basel, Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland

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Publications (84)253.91 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Quantitative MRI techniques detect disease progression in myopathies more sensitively than muscle function measures or conventional MRI. To date only conventional MRI using visual rating scales is available for measurement of disease progression in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Methods: in 3 patients with BMD (mean age 36.8 years) the mean fat fraction (MFF) of the thigh muscles was assessed by MRI at baseline and at 1-year follow-up using a 2-point Dixon approach (2PD). The motor function measurement scale (MFM) was used for clinical assessment. Results: The mean MFF of all muscles at baseline was 61.6 % (SD 7.6). It increased by 3.7 % to 65.3 % (SD 4.7) at follow-up. The severity of muscle involvement varied between various muscle groups. Discussion: as in other myopathies, 2PD can quantify fatty muscle degeneration in BMD and can detect disease progression in a small sample size and at relatively short imaging intervals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.
    Muscle & Nerve 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/mus.24629 · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Respiratory organ motion is still the major challenge of various image-guided treatments in the abdomen. Dynamic organ motion tracking, necessary for the treatment control, can be performed with volumetric time-resolved MRI that sequentially acquires one image and one navigator slice. Here, a novel imaging method is proposed for truly simultaneous high temporal resolution acquisition. A standard balanced steady state free precession sequence was modified to simultaneously acquire two superimposed slices with different phase cycles, namely an image and a navigator slice. Instead of multiband RF pulses, two separate RF pulses were used for the excitation. Images were reconstructed using offline CAIPIRINHA reconstruction. Phantom and in vivo measurements of healthy volunteers were performed and evaluated. Phantom and in vivo measurements showed good image quality with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and no reconstruction issues. We present a novel imaging method for truly simultaneous acquisition of image and navigator slices for four-dimensional (4D) MRI of organ motion. In this method, the time lag between the sequential acquisitions is eliminated, leading to an improved accuracy of organ motion models, while CAIPIRINHA reconstruction results in an improved SNR compared with an existing 4D MRI approach. Magn Reson Med, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 02/2015; 73(2). DOI:10.1002/mrm.25134 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study assesses whether magnetization transfer (MT) imaging provides additive information to conventional MRI in brain tumors. MT data of 26 patients with neoplastic and metastatic brain tumors were analyzed at 1.5 T. For the 3 largest tumor groups investigated in this study-glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), meningiomas, and metastases-statistical comparisons were performed. Analyzed MT parameters included the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and 4 quantitative MT parameters (qMT): Relaxation times (T1, T2), exchange rate (kf), and macromolecular content (F). Total imaging time of high-resolution whole brain MTR and qMT imaging with balanced steady-state free precession required 9 minutes. Five ROIs were chosen: Contrast-enhancing (T1W-CE), noncontrast-enhancing (T1W-non-CE), proximal hyperintensity (T2W-pSI), distal hyperintensity (T2W-dSI), and a reference (ref). Pathologies showed significant (P < .05) MT changes (MTR and qMT) compared to the reference. The T1W-CE, T1W-non-CE, and T2W-pSI ROIs of GBMs, meningiomas, and metastases showed significant differences in MTR and qMT estimates. Similar MTR with significant different qMT values were observed in several ROIs among different lesions. MT maps (MTR and qMT) indicated changes in tissue appearing unaffected on MRI in most glial tumors. MTR and qMT imaging enables a better differentiation between brain tumors and provides additive information to MRI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.
    Journal of neuroimaging: official journal of the American Society of Neuroimaging 02/2015; DOI:10.1111/jon.12222 · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Different pathological processes like demyelination and axonal loss can alter the magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) in brain tissue. The standard method to measure this effect is to scan the respective tissue twice, one with and one without a specific saturation pulse. A major drawback of this technique based on spoiled gradient echo (GRE) sequences relates to its long acquisition time due to the saturation pulses. Recently, an alternative concept for MT imaging based on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) has been proposed. Modification of the duration of the radiofrequency pulses for imaging allows scanning MT sensitive and non-sensitive images. The steady-state character of bSSFP with high intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) allows three-dimensional (3D) whole brain MTR at high spatial resolution within short and thus clinically feasible acquisition times. In the present study, both bSSFP-MT and 2D GRE-MT imaging were used in a cohort of 31 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) to characterize different normal appearing (NA) and pathological brain structures. Under the constraint of identical SNR and scan time, a 3.4 times higher voxel size could be achieved with bSSFP. This increased resolution allowed a more accurate delineation of the different brain structures, especially of cortex, hippocampus and MS lesions. In a multiple linear regression model, we found an association between MTR of cortical lesions and a clinical measure of disability (r=-0.407, p=0.035) in the bSSFP dataset only. The different relaxation weighting of the base images (T2/T1 in bSSFP, proton density in GRE) had no effects besides a larger spreading of the MTR values of the different NA structures. This was demonstrated by the nearly perfect linearity between the NA matter MTR of both techniques as well as in the absolute MTR differences between NA matter and the respective lesions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    NeuroImage 12/2014; 108. DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.12.045 · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm(2)/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm(2)/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. • MRI is used to assess morphology of the repair tissue during follow-up. • Quantitative MRI allows an estimation of biochemical properties of the repair tissue. • Differences between repair tissue and cartilage were more significant with dwDESS than T2 mapping.
    European Radiology 11/2014; DOI:10.1007/s00330-014-3490-5 · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Physiologic and pathologic arterial tortuosity may attenuate blood flow pulsatility. The aim of this prospective study was to assess a potential effect of the curved V3 segment (Atlas slope) of the vertebral artery on arterial flow pulsatility. The pulsatility index and resistance index were used to assess blood flow pulsatility.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 11/2014; 36(3). DOI:10.3174/ajnr.A4148 · 3.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is considered to be a promising treatment for localized cancer in abdominal organs such as liver, pancreas, or kidney. Abdominal motion, anatomical arrangement, and required sustained sonication are the main challenges. MR acquisition consisted of thermometry performed with segmented gradient-recalled echo echo-planar imaging, and a segment-based one-dimensional MR navigator parallel to the main axis of motion to track the organ motion. This tracking information was used in real-time for: (i) prospective motion correction of MR thermometry and (ii) HIFU focal point position lock-on target. Ex vivo experiments were performed on a sheep liver and a turkey pectoral muscle using a motion demonstrator, while in vivo experiments were conducted on two sheep liver. Prospective motion correction of MR thermometry yielded good signal-to-noise ratio (range, 25 to 35) and low geometric distortion due to the use of segmented EPI. HIFU focal point lock-on target yielded isotropic in-plane thermal build-up. The feasibility of in vivo intercostal liver treatment was demonstrated in sheep. The presented method demonstrated in moving phantoms and breathing sheep accurate motion-compensated MR thermometry and precise HIFU focal point lock-on target using only real-time pencil-beam navigator tracking information, making it applicable without any pretreatment data acquisition or organ motion modeling. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 10/2014; 72(4). DOI:10.1002/mrm.25017 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) imaging by steady state free precession is a promising imaging method to assess microstructural changes within the myocardium. Hence, MTR imaging was correlated to histological analysis. Three postmortem cases were selected based on a suspicion of myocardial infarction. MTR and T2 -weighted (T2w ) imaging was performed, followed by autopsy and histological analysis. All tissue abnormalities, identified by autopsy or histology, were retrospectively selected on visually matched MTR and T2w images, and corresponding MTR values compared with normal appearing tissue. Regions of elevated MTR (up to approximately 20%, as compared to normal tissue), appearing hypo-intense in T2w -images, revealed the presence of fibrous tissue in microscopic histological analysis. Macroscopic observation (autopsy) described scar tissue only in one case. Regions of reduced MTR (up to approximately 20%) corresponded either to (i) the presence of edema, appearing hyperintense in T2w -images and confirmed by autopsy, or to (ii) inflammatory granulocyte infiltration at a microscopic level, appearing as hypo-intense T2w -signal, but not observed by autopsy. Findings from cardiovascular MTR imaging corresponded to histology results. In contrast to T2w -imaging, MTR imaging discriminated between normal myocardium, scar tissue and regions of acute myocardial infarction in all three cases. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 10/2014; 40(4). DOI:10.1002/jmri.24460 · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For imaging of fibrous musculoskeletal components, ultra-short echo time methods are often combined with fat suppression. Due to the increased chemical shift, spectral excitation of water might become a favorable option at ultra-high fields. Thus, this study aims to compare and explore short binomial excitation schemes for spectrally selective imaging of fibrous tissue components with short transverse relaxation time (T2 ). Water selective 1-1-binomial excitation is compared with nonselective imaging using a sub-millisecond spoiled gradient echo technique for in vivo imaging of fibrous tissue at 3T and 7T. Simulations indicate a maximum signal loss from binomial excitation of approximately 30% in the limit of very short T2 (0.1 ms), as compared to nonselective imaging; decreasing rapidly with increasing field strength and increasing T2 , e.g., to 19% at 3T and 10% at 7T for T2 of 1 ms. In agreement with simulations, a binomial phase close to 90° yielded minimum signal loss: approximately 6% at 3T and close to 0% at 7T for menisci, and for ligaments 9% and 13%, respectively. Overall, for imaging of short-lived T2 components, short 1-1 binomial excitation schemes prove to offer marginal signal loss especially at ultra-high fields with overall improved scanning efficiency. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 09/2014; 72(3). DOI:10.1002/mrm.24978 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quantitative MRI techniques, such as T2 relaxometry, have demonstrated the potential to detect changes in the tissue microstructure of the human brain with higher specificity to the underlying pathology than in conventional morphological imaging. At high to ultra-high field strengths, quantitative MR-based tissue characterization benefits from the higher signal-to-noise ratio traded for either improved resolution or reduced scan time, but is impaired by severe static (B0 ) and transmit (B1 ) field heterogeneities. The objective of this study was to derive a robust relaxometry technique for fast T2 mapping of the human brain at high to ultra-high fields, which is highly insensitive to B0 and B1 field variations. The proposed method relies on a recently presented three-dimensional (3D) triple-echo steady-state (TESS) imaging approach that has proven to be suitable for fast intrinsically B1 -insensitive T2 relaxometry of rigid targets. In this work, 3D TESS imaging is adapted for rapid high- to ultra-high-field two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions. The achieved short scan times of 2D TESS measurements reduce motion sensitivity and make TESS-based T2 quantification feasible in the brain. After validation in vitro and in vivo at 3 T, T2 maps of the human brain were obtained at 7 and 9.4 T. Excellent agreement between TESS-based T2 measurements and reference single-echo spin-echo data was found in vitro and in vivo at 3 T, and T2 relaxometry based on TESS imaging was proven to be feasible and reliable in the human brain at 7 and 9.4 T. Although prominent B0 and B1 field variations occur at ultra-high fields, the T2 maps obtained show no B0 - or B1 -related degradations. In conclusion, as a result of the observed robustness, TESS T2 may emerge as a valuable measure for the early diagnosis and progression monitoring of brain diseases in high-resolution 2D acquisitions at high to ultra-high fields. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    NMR in Biomedicine 09/2014; 27(9). DOI:10.1002/nbm.3152 · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 08/2014; 72(2). DOI:10.1002/mrm.25281 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeTo develop a novel sequence for simultaneous quantification of T1 and T2 relaxation times in the myocardium based on the transient phase of the balanced steady-state free precession.MethodsA new prototype sequence, named “cardiac balanced-SSFP inversion recovery with interleaved sampling acquisition” (CABIRIA) was developed based on a single-shot bSSFP readout following an inversion pulse. With this method, T1 and T2 values can be calculated from the analysis of signal evolution. The scan duration for a single slice in vivo was 8 heartbeats, thus feasible in a breath-hold. The sequence was validated both in vitro by comparing it to conventional inversion recovery and multi-echo spin-echo methods and in 5 healthy volunteers by comparing it to the Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence and to a T2 quantification sequence based on multi-T2-prepared bSSFP.ResultsThe method showed good agreement with conventional methods for both T1 and T2 measurements (concordance correlation coefficient ≥ 0.99) in vitro. In healthy volunteers the measured T1 values were 1227 ± 68 ms and T2 values 37.9 ± 2.4 ms, with similar inter- and intrasubject variability with respect to existing methods.Conclusion The proposed CABIRIA method enables simultaneous quantification of myocardial T1 and T2 values with good accuracy and precision. Magn Reson Med, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 08/2014; DOI:10.1002/mrm.25402 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the availability of new and more accurate tumour treatment modalities such as high-intensity focused ultrasound or proton therapy, accurate target location prediction has become a key issue. Various approaches for diverse application scenarios have been proposed over the last decade. Whereas external surrogate markers such as a breathing belt work to some extent, knowledge about the internal motion of the organs inherently provides more accurate results. In this paper, we combine a population-based statistical motion model and information from 2d ultrasound sequences in order to predict the respiratory motion of the right liver lobe. For this, the motion model is fitted to a 3d exhalation breath-hold scan of the liver acquired before prediction. Anatomical landmarks tracked in the ultrasound images together with the model are then used to reconstruct the complete organ position over time. The prediction is both spatial and temporal, can be computed in real-time and is evaluated on ground truth over long time scales (5.5min). The method is quantitatively validated on eight volunteers where the ultrasound images are synchronously acquired with 4D-MRI, which provides ground-truth motion. With an average spatial prediction accuracy of 2.4mm, we can predict tumour locations within clinically acceptable margins.
    Medical Image Analysis 07/2014; 18(5). DOI:10.1016/j.media.2014.03.006 · 3.68 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Neurophysiology 06/2014; 125:S30-S31. DOI:10.1016/S1388-2457(14)50116-2 · 2.98 Impact Factor
  • RöFo - Fortschritte auf dem Gebiet der Röntgenstrahlen und der bildgebenden Verfahren; 04/2014
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to differentiate between normal, degenerative meniscus, and meniscal tears using monoexponentially and biexponentially calculated T2 *. Meniscal disease, characterized by an altered collagen fiber matrix, might be detectable in vivo using quantitative T2 * mapping. METHODS: A 3D Cartesian spoiled gradient echo technique was adapted to enable the use of a variable echo time approach in combination with a highly asymmetric readout. T2 * was calculated monoexponentially and biexponentially using three- and five-parametric non-linear fits, respectively. RESULTS: From a total of 68 evaluated menisci, 48 were normal, 12 were degenerated, and eight had tears. Mean values for the short (T2 *s ) and long (T2 *l ) T2 * components were as follows: in normal menisci, 0.82 ± 0.38/15.0 ± 5.4 ms, respectively; in degenerated menisci, 1.29 ± 0.53/19.97 ± 5.59 ms, respectively; and, in meniscal tears, 2.05 ± 0.73 and 26.83 ± 7.72 ms, respectively. Biexponentially fitted T2 * demonstrated a greater ability to distinguish normal and degenerated menisci using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis (higher area under curve as well as higher specificity and sensitivity). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that biexponential fitting, used for T2 * calculation in the menisci, provides better results compared to monoexponential fitting. Observed changes in T2 * result from the matrix reorganization in degenerative processes in the menisci, which affects the collagen fiber orientation, as well as content. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 03/2014; 71(3). DOI:10.1002/mrm.24760 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    Rahel Heule, Carl Ganter, Oliver Bieri
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In principle, double echo steady state (DESS) offers morphological and quantitative T2 imaging of cartilage within one single scan. However, accurate T2 estimation is hampered by its prominent T1 dependency in the limit of low flip angles, generally used to image cartilage morphology, as for the osteoarthritis initiative. A new postprocessing approach is introduced to overcome this T1 -related bias for rapid DESS-based T2 quantification in the low flip angle regime. METHODS: Based on a rough global T1 estimator and a golden section search, T2 is extracted from the ratio of the two echoes acquired with DESS. The new relaxometry method is evaluated from simulations and in vivo 3D measurements of the knee joint at 3T. RESULTS: A pronounced reduction in the T1 -related bias of DESS-T2 estimation and increased zonal variation in T2 between deep and superficial cartilage layers are observed. The improvement becomes particularly evident in the range of low flip angles (α < 45°), commonly used for morphological DESS imaging. CONCLUSION: Using a simple global T1 estimate, the reliability of DESS-T2 quantification can be considerably increased. The results emphasize the potential of DESS to fuse accurate quantitative T2 and morphological imaging of the musculoskeletal system within one single scan. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 03/2014; 71(3). DOI:10.1002/mrm.24748 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    Rahel Heule, Carl Ganter, Oliver Bieri
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Rapid imaging techniques have attracted increased interest for relaxometry, but none are perfect: they are prone to static (B0 ) and transmit (B1 ) field heterogeneities, and commonly biased by T2 /T1 . The purpose of this study is the development of a rapid T1 and T2 relaxometry method that is completely (T2 ) or partly (T1 ) bias-free. METHODS: A new method is introduced to simultaneously quantify T1 and T2 within one single scan based on a triple echo steady-state (TESS) approach in combination with an iterative golden section search. TESS relaxometry is optimized and evaluated from simulations, in vitro studies, and in vivo experiments. RESULTS: It is found that relaxometry with TESS is not biased by T2 /T1 , insensitive to B0 heterogeneities, and, surprisingly, that TESS-T2 is not affected by B1 field errors. Consequently, excellent correspondence between TESS and reference spin echo data is observed for T2 in vitro at 1.5 T and in vivo at 3 T. CONCLUSION: TESS offers rapid T1 and T2 quantification within one single scan, and in particular B1 -insensitive T2 estimation. As a result, the new proposed method is of high interest for fast and reliable high-resolution T2 mapping, especially of the musculoskeletal system at high to ultra-high fields. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 01/2014; 71(1). DOI:10.1002/mrm.24659 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blood flow velocity measurement with phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is widely applied in clinical routine imaging. Usually, velocity and volumetric flow measurements are performed using unidirectional encoding of the through-plane velocity with a 2-dimensional (2D) acquisition. Single-slice acquisitions and measurements with unidirectional encoding, however, may lead to significant errors, especially in tortuous vessels, but might benefit from higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). To evaluate the impact of volumetric acquisition and multidirectional velocity encoding, blood velocity measurements were performed at 3 locations in the distal internal carotid artery with a 3-dimensional, 3-directional time-resolved phase contrast (PC) sequence (4-dimensional [4D]) and a 2D acquisition with 3-directional (2D-3dir) and through-plane velocity encoding (2D-tp) derived from the same sequence. Twenty carotid arteries of 10 healthy volunteers (24-37 years) were evaluated. For each volunteer, 1 4D acquisition and 3 2D 3-directional PC measurements were placed according to a time-of-flight angiography. Unidirectionally encoded through-plane velocities were derived from the multidirectionally encoded 2D scan by discarding the in-plane components. Regions of interest were identified on the slab after postprocessing and visualization for the 4D data set as well as directly on the digital imaging and communications in medicine images for the 2D measurement. Blood flow velocity, volumetric flow, and SNRs were measured at carotid segments C4, C5, and C7 on both sides obtaining 20 values per vessel location. The quantities were tested for significant differences between each modality at all 3 locations with paired t tests. At the segments C5 and C7, the highest peak velocities (PVs) were measured with the 4D sequence, followed by 2D-3dir and 2D tp. The PV differences between the sequences were significant (P < 0.01) at both locations. At the proximal segment of the carotid siphon (C4), the PV values of the 2D-3dir sequence were significantly higher than the ones measured with 2D-tp. The mean PV value of the 4D sequence was located in between 2D-3dir and 2D-tp without significant differences to either of the 2D sequences. Volumetric flow measurements were also significantly different between 2D and 4D acquisitions, but without a discernible trend. The SNR analysis clearly favored 2D over 4D acquisitions because of higher inflow enhancement. The results of the current study show that velocity measurements with a unidirectional encoded through-plane PC sequence lead to a significant underestimation of velocity values in tortuous vessels. In all 3 evaluated segments of the distal internal carotid artery, multidirectional velocity encoding revealed significantly higher PV values than those of unidirectional velocity encoding. These results indicate that multidirectional encoding should be preferred to unidirectional encoding for velocity measurements in tortuous vessels. Furthermore, 4D PC-MRI is superior to 2D-3dir in 2 of 3 locations. However, single-slice measurements with multidirectional velocity encoding have higher SNR and may be an alternative to 4D PC-MRI with a scan time of only approximately 90 seconds per slice.
    Investigative radiology 12/2013; DOI:10.1097/RLI.0000000000000013 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A novel B1+-mapping technique (B1-TRAP) is presented, which derives the actual flip angle from the frequency of signal oscillations, observed in the transient phase of unbalanced steady-state free precession sequences. THEORY: For short repetition times (TR), the angular frequency of distinct oscillations in the transient phase of steady-state free precession sequences is proven to be approximately proportional to the actual flip angle: ω⋅TR≈α. The result is not influenced by off-resonance and it can be shown that deviations are only of second order in the small parameter TR/T2. METHODS: B1-TRAP makes use of this effect through a frequency analysis of the transient phase of a train of steady-state free precession signals. RESULTS: In terms of reliability and time efficiency, a two-dimensional multislice implementation was found to be optimal. Unlike many steady-state B1+-mapping methods, the accuracy of B1-TRAP was not impaired by imperfect slice profiles. CONCLUSION: Simulations, phantom, and in vivo measurements showed that B1-TRAP offers a good compromise with respect to speed, robustness, and accuracy. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 12/2013; 70(6). DOI:10.1002/mrm.24598 · 3.40 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
253.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2015
    • Universitätsspital Basel
      • Medical Image Analysis Center - MIAC
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2014
    • Kantonsspital Baselland Bruderholz
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 1999–2014
    • Universität Basel
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Department of Biophysical Chemistry
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2010
    • Medical University of Vienna
      Wien, Vienna, Austria