Jan A K W Kiel

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States

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Publications (109)503.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Research in autophagy continues to accelerate,(1) and as a result many new scientists are entering the field. Accordingly, it is important to establish a standard set of criteria for monitoring macroautophagy in different organisms. Recent reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose.(2,3) There are many useful and convenient methods that can be used to monitor macroautophagy in yeast, but relatively few in other model systems, and there is much confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure macroautophagy in higher eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers of autophagosomes versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway; thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from fully functional autophagy that includes delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of the methods that can be used by investigators who are attempting to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as by reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that investigate these processes. This set of guidelines is not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify an autophagic response.
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    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4):1-100. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process);5,6 thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4). · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4):445-544. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4):445. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Industrial production of semi-synthetic cephalosporins by Penicillium chrysogenum requires supplementation of the growth media with the side-chain precursor adipic acid. In glucose-limited chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum, up to 88% of the consumed adipic acid was not recovered in cephalosporin-related products, but used as an additional carbon and energy source for growth. This low efficiency of side-chain precursor incorporation provides an economic incentive for studying and engineering the metabolism of adipic acid in P. chrysogenum. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis in the presence and absence of adipic acid confirmed that adipic acid metabolism in this fungus occurs via β-oxidation. A set of 52 adipate-responsive genes included six putative genes for acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases, enzymes responsible for the first step of β-oxidation. Subcellular localization of the differentially expressed acyl-CoA oxidases and dehydrogenases revealed that the oxidases were exclusively targeted to peroxisomes, while the dehydrogenases were found either in peroxisomes or in mitochondria. Deletion of the genes encoding the peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase Pc20g01800 and the mitochondrial acyl-CoA dehydrogenase Pc20g07920 resulted in a 1.6- and 3.7-fold increase in the production of the semi-synthetic cephalosporin intermediate adipoyl-6-APA, respectively. The deletion strains also showed reduced adipate consumption compared to the reference strain, indicating that engineering of the first step of β-oxidation successfully redirected a larger fraction of adipic acid towards cephalosporin biosynthesis.
    Metabolic Engineering 02/2012; 14(4):437-48. · 6.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have analyzed the role of the three members of the Pex11 protein family in peroxisome formation in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. Two of these, Pex11 and Pex11C, are components of the peroxisomal membrane, while Pex11B is present at the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that Pex11 is a major factor involved in peroxisome proliferation. We also demonstrate that P. chrysogenum cells deleted for known peroxisome fission factors (all Pex11 family proteins and Vps1) still contain peroxisomes. Interestingly, we find that, unlike in mammals, Pex16 is not essential for peroxisome biogenesis in P. chrysogenum, as partially functional peroxisomes are present in a pex16 deletion strain. We also show that Pex16 is not involved in de novo biogenesis of peroxisomes, as peroxisomes were still present in quadruple Δpex11 Δpex11B Δpex11C Δpex16 mutant cells. By contrast, pex3 deletion in P. chrysogenum led to cells devoid of peroxisomes, suggesting that Pex3 may function independently of Pex16. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of intact peroxisomes is important for the efficiency of ß-lactam antibiotics production by P. chrysogenum. Remarkably, distinct from earlier results with low penicillin producing laboratory strains, upregulation of peroxisome numbers in a high producing P. chrysogenum strain had no significant effect on penicillin production.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(4):e35490. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hansenula polymorpha is an important yeast in industrial biotechnology. In addition, it is extensively used in fundamental research devoted to unravel the principles of peroxisome biology and nitrate assimilation. Here we present an overview of key components of the genetic toolbox for H. polymorpha. In addition, we present new selection markers that we recently implemented in H. polymorpha. We describe novel strategies for the efficient creation of targeted gene deletions and integrations in H. polymorpha. For this, we generated a yku80 mutant, deficient in non-homologous end joining, resulting in strongly enhanced efficiency of gene targeting relative to the parental strain. Finally, we show the implementation of Gateway technology and a single-step PCR strategy to create deletions in H. polymorpha.
    FEMS Yeast Research 11/2011; 12(3):271-8. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In microbial production of non-catabolic products such as antibiotics a loss of production capacity upon long-term cultivation (for example chemostat), a phenomenon called strain degeneration, is often observed. In this study a systems biology approach, monitoring changes from gene to produced flux, was used to study degeneration of penicillin production in a high producing Penicillium chrysogenum strain during prolonged ethanol-limited chemostat cultivations. During these cultivations, the biomass specific penicillin production rate decreased more than 10-fold in less than 22 generations. No evidence was obtained for a decrease of the copy number of the penicillin gene cluster, nor a significant down regulation of the expression of the penicillin biosynthesis genes. However, a strong down regulation of the biosynthesis pathway of cysteine, one of the precursors of penicillin, was observed. Furthermore the protein levels of the penicillin pathway enzymes L-α-(δ-aminoadipyl)-L-α-cystenyl-D-α-valine synthetase (ACVS) and isopenicillin-N synthase (IPNS), decreased significantly. Re-cultivation of fully degenerated cells in unlimited batch culture and subsequent C-limited chemostats did only result in a slight recovery of penicillin production. Our findings indicate that the observed degeneration is attributed to a significant decrease of the levels of the first two enzymes of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway, ACVS and IPNS. This decrease is not caused by genetic instability of the penicillin amplicon, neither by down regulation of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore no indications were obtained for degradation of these enzymes as a result of autophagy. Possible causes for the decreased enzyme levels could be a decrease of the translation efficiency of ACVS and IPNS during degeneration, or the presence of a culture variant impaired in the biosynthesis of functional proteins of these enzymes, which outcompeted the high producing part of the population.
    BMC Systems Biology 08/2011; 5:132. · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In large-scale production reactors the combination of high broth viscosity and large broth volume leads to insufficient liquid-phase mixing, resulting in gradients in, for example, the concentrations of substrate and oxygen. This often leads to differences in productivity of the full-scale process compared with laboratory scale. In this scale-down study of penicillin production, the influence of substrate gradients on process performance and cell physiology was investigated by imposing an intermittent feeding regime on a laboratory-scale culture of a high yielding strain of Penicillium chrysogenum. It was found that penicillin production was reduced by a factor of two in the intermittently fed cultures relative to constant feed cultivations fed with the same amount of glucose per hour, while the biomass yield was the same. Measurement of the levels of the intermediates of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway, along with the enzyme levels, suggested that the reduction of the flux through the penicillin pathway is mainly the result of a lower influx into the pathway, possibly due to inhibitory levels of adenosine monophosphate and pyrophosphate and lower activating levels of adenosine triphosphate during the zero-substrate phase of each cycle of intermittent feeding.
    Biotechnology Journal 08/2011; 6(8):944-58. · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • Magdalena Bartoszewska, Jan A K W Kiel
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    ABSTRACT: Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a bulk degradative pathway by which cytoplasmic components are delivered to the vacuole for recycling. This process is conserved from yeast to human, where it is implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. During the last decade, many ATG genes involved in autophagy have been identified, initially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy using yeast as model system. Although many of the core components involved in autophagy are conserved from yeast to human, there are, nevertheless, significant differences between these organisms, for example, during autophagy initiation. Autophagy also plays an essential role in filamentous fungi especially during differentiation. Remarkably, in these species autophagy may reflect features of both yeast and mammals. This is exemplified by the finding that filamentous fungi lack the S. cerevisiae clade-specific Atg31 protein, but contain Atg101, which is absent in this clade. A reappraisal of genome data further suggests that, similar to yeast and mammals, filamentous fungi probably also contain two distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complexes. This review also summarizes the state of knowledge on the role of autophagy in filamentous fungi during differentiation, such as pathogenic development, programmed cell death during heteroincompatibility, and spore formation.
    Antioxidants & Redox Signaling 06/2011; 14(11):2271-87. · 8.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the significance of autophagy in the production of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin (PEN) by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. In this fungus PEN production is compartmentalized in the cytosol and in peroxisomes. We demonstrate that under PEN-producing conditions significant amounts of cytosolic and peroxisomal proteins are degraded via autophagy. Morphological analysis, based on electron and fluorescence microscopy, revealed that this phenomenon might contribute to progressive deterioration of late subapical cells. We show that deletion of the P. chrysogenum ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae serine-threonine kinase atg1 results in impairment of autophagy. In P. chrysogenum atg1 cells, a distinct delay in cell degeneration is observed relative to wild-type cells. This phenomenon is associated with an increase in the enzyme levels of the PEN biosynthetic pathway and enhanced production levels of this antibacterial compound.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 02/2011; 77(4):1413-22. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pex11 is a key player in peroxisome proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms of its function are still unknown. Here, we show that Pex11 contains a conserved sequence at the N-terminus that can adopt the structure of an amphipathic helix. Using Penicillium chrysogenum Pex11, we show that this amphipathic helix, termed Pex11-Amph, associates with liposomes in vitro. This interaction is especially evident when negatively charged liposomes are used with a phospholipid content resembling that of peroxisomal membranes. Binding of Pex11-Amph to negatively charged membrane vesicles resulted in strong tubulation. This tubulation of vesicles was also observed when the entire soluble N-terminal domain of Pex11 was used. Using mutant peptides, we demonstrate that maintaining the amphipathic properties of Pex11-Amph in conjunction with retaining its α-helical structure are crucial for its function. We show that the membrane remodelling capacity of the amphipathic helix in Pex11 is conserved from yeast to man. Finally, we demonstrate that mutations abolishing the membrane remodelling activity of the Pex11-Amph domain also hamper the function of full-length Pex11 in peroxisome fission in vivo.
    The EMBO Journal 01/2011; 30(1):5-16. · 9.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, penicillin (PEN) production is compartmentalized in the cytosol and in peroxisomes. Here we show that intact peroxisomes that contain the two final enzymes of PEN biosynthesis, acyl coenzyme A (CoA):6-amino penicillanic acid acyltransferase (AT) as well as the side-chain precursor activation enzyme phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL), are crucial for efficient PEN synthesis. Moreover, increasing PEN titers are associated with increasing peroxisome numbers. However, not all conditions that result in enhanced peroxisome numbers simultaneously stimulate PEN production. We find that conditions that lead to peroxisome proliferation but simultaneously interfere with the normal physiology of the cell may be detrimental to antibiotic production. We furthermore show that peroxisomes develop in germinating conidiospores from reticule-like structures. During subsequent hyphal growth, peroxisome proliferation occurs at the tip of the growing hyphae, after which the organelles are distributed over newly formed subapical cells. We observed that the organelle proliferation machinery requires the dynamin-like protein Dnm1.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 09/2010; 76(17):5702-9. · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: By genome analysis, we previously identified Pex14/17p as a putative novel peroxin of Penicillium chrysogenum. Here, we show that Pex14/17p is a component of the peroxisomal membrane that is essential for efficient peroxisomal targeting signal 1 and peroxisomal targeting signal 2 matrix protein import, implying that the protein is indeed a genuine peroxin. Additionally, a PEX14/17 deletion strain is affected in conidiospore formation. Pex14/17p has properties of both Pex14p and Pex17p, in that the N-terminus of this protein is similar to the highly conserved Pex5p-binding region present in the N-termini of Pex14p proteins, whereas its C-terminus shows weak similarity to yeast Pex17p proteins. We have identified a novel motif in both Pex17p and Pex14/17p that is absent in Pex14p. We show that an N-terminally truncated, but not a C-terminally truncated, Pex14/17p is able to complement both the matrix protein import and sporulation defects of a Δpex14/17 strain, implying that it is the Pex17p-related portion of the protein that is crucial for its function as a peroxin. Possibly, this compensates for the fact that P. chrysogenum lacks an authenthic Pex17p. We also show that, in P. chrysogenum, Pex14/17p plays a role in making the penicillin biosynthesis process more efficient.
    FEBS Journal 07/2010; 277(15):3203 - 3218. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    Jan A K W Kiel
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    ABSTRACT: Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components will be catabolized by (macro)autophagy in order to re-use building blocks and to support ATP production. In many cases, autophagy takes care of cellular housekeeping to sustain cellular viability. Autophagy encompasses a multitude of related and often highly specific processes that are implicated in both biogenetic and catabolic processes. Recent data indicate that in some unicellular eukaryotes that undergo profound differentiation during their life cycle (e.g. kinetoplastid parasites and amoebes), autophagy is essential for the developmental change that allows the cell to adapt to a new host or form spores. This review summarizes the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy as well as the cytoplasm-to-vacuole-targeting pathway, pexophagy, mitophagy, ER-phagy, ribophagy and piecemeal microautophagy of the nucleus, all highly selective forms of autophagy that have first been uncovered in yeast species. Additionally, a detailed analysis will be presented on the state of knowledge on autophagy in non-yeast unicellular eukaryotes with emphasis on the role of this process in differentiation.
    Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B Biological Sciences 03/2010; 365(1541):819-30. · 6.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the peroxisomal protein Inp2 is required for inheritance of peroxisomes to the bud, by connecting the organelles to the motor protein Myo2 and the actin cytoskeleton. Recent data suggested that the function of Inp2 may not be conserved in other yeast species. Using in silico analyses we have identified a weakly conserved Inp2-related protein in 18 species of budding yeast and analyzed the role of the identified protein in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha in peroxisome inheritance. Our data show that H. polymorpha Inp2 locates to peroxisomes, interacts with Myo2, and is essential for peroxisome inheritance.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 02/2010; 1803(5):617-22. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Activation of the cephalosporin side-chain precursor to the corresponding CoA-thioester is an essential step for its incorporation into the beta-lactam backbone. To identify an acyl-CoA ligase involved in activation of adipate, we searched in the genome database of Penicillium chrysogenum for putative structural genes encoding acyl-CoA ligases. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis was used to identify the one presenting the highest expression level when cells were grown in the presence of adipate. Deletion of the gene renamed aclA, led to a 32% decreased specific rate of adipate consumption and a threefold reduction of adipoyl-6-aminopenicillanic acid levels, but did not affect penicillin V production. After overexpression in Escherichia coli, the purified protein was shown to have a broad substrate range including adipate. Finally, protein-fusion with cyan-fluorescent protein showed co-localization with microbody-borne acyl-transferase. Identification and functional characterization of aclA may aid in developing future metabolic engineering strategies for improving the production of different cephalosporins.
    Fungal Genetics and Biology 10/2009; 47(1):33-42. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular proteins and organelles such as peroxisomes are under continuous quality control. Upon synthesis in the cytosol, peroxisomal proteins are kept in an import-competent state by chaperones or specific proteins with an analogous function to prevent degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. During protein translocation into the organelle, the peroxisomal targeting signal receptors (Pex5, Pex20) are also continuously undergoing quality control to enable efficient functioning of the translocon (RADAR pathway). Even upon maturation of peroxisomes, matrix enzymes and peroxisomal membranes remain subjected to quality control. As a result of their oxidative metabolism, peroxisomes are producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may damage proteins and lipids. To counteract ROS-induced damage, yeast peroxisomes contain two important antioxidant enzymes: catalase and an organelle-specific peroxiredoxin. Additionally, a Lon-type protease has recently been identified in the peroxisomal matrix, which is capable of degrading nonfunctional proteins. Finally, cellular housekeeping processes keep track of the functioning of peroxisomes so that dysfunctional organelles can be quickly removed via selective autophagy (pexophagy). This review provides an overview of the major processes involved in quality control of yeast peroxisomes.
    FEMS Yeast Research 06/2009; 9(6):808-20. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, microbodies are essential for penicillin biosynthesis. To better understand the role of these organelles in antibiotics production, we determined the matrix enzyme contents of P. chrysogenum microbodies. Using a novel in silico approach, we first obtained a catalogue of 200 P. chrysogenum proteins with putative microbody targeting signals (PTSs). This included two orthologs of proteins involved in cephalosporin biosynthesis, which we demonstrate to be bona fide microbody matrix constituents. Subsequently, we performed a proteomics based inventory of P. chrysogenum microbody matrix proteins using nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 89 microbody proteins, 79 with a PTS, including the two known microbody-borne penicillin biosynthesis enzymes, isopenicillin N:acyl CoA acyltransferase and phenylacetyl-CoA ligase. Comparative analysis revealed that 69 out of 79 PTS proteins identified experimentally were in the reference list. A prominent microbody protein was identified as a novel fumarate reductase-cytochrome b5 fusion protein, which contains an internal PTS2 between the two functional domains. We show that this protein indeed localizes to P. chrysogenum microbodies.
    Functional & Integrative Genomics 02/2009; 9(2):167-84. · 3.83 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
503.95 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Michigan
      • Life Sciences Institute
      Ann Arbor, MI, United States
  • 1994–2012
    • University of Groningen
      • • Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (GBB)
      • • Department of Medical Microbiology
      • • Department of Genetics
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands
  • 2007
    • Kyoto University
      • Division of Applied Life Sciences
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan
  • 1999
    • Osaka Prefecture University
      • Department of Veterinary Science
      Sakai, Osaka-fu, Japan
  • 1996
    • University of Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands