Yoon-Kyong Lee

Seoul National University, Seoul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (3)2.84 Total impact

  • Yoon-Kyong Lee, Myoung-Ae Choe, Gyeong Ju An
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cerebral ischemia on Type I(soleus) and Type II(plantaris, gastrocnemius) muscles, and to determine the effects of isometric contraction training by electrostimulation on Type I and II muscles in cerebral ischemia model rats. Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: ST(stroke), STES(stroke+electrostimulation), SH(sham) and SHES (sham+electrostimulation). The ST and STES groups received a transient right middle cerebral artery occlusion operation. The SH and SHES groups received a sham operation. The STES and SHES groups had daily isometric contraction training by electrostimulation(100 Hz, 45 mA, 7.5 V) on hindlimb muscles for 7 days. Plantaris and gastrocenmius muscle weight, myofibrillar protein contents of soleus and gastrocnemius, and the muscle fiber cross-sectional area of gastrocnemius in the ST group significantly decreased compared with the SH group. Soleus, plantaris, gastrocnemius muscle weight, myofibrillar protein contents of soleus and gastrocnemius, and the Type I muscle fiber cross-sectional area of soleus and the Type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area of gastrocnemius in the STES group significantly increased compared with the ST group. Hindlimb muscle atrophy occurs after acute stroke and isometric contraction training by electrostimulation during early stages of a stroke attenuates muscle atrophy of Type I and Type II muscles.
    Taehan Kanho Hakhoe chi 01/2007; 36(7):1232-41.
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the effects of daily low-intensity exercise following acute stroke on mass, Type I and II fiber cross-sectional area, and myofibrillar protein content of hind-limb muscles in a rat model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups (n = 7-9 per group): stroke (occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery [RMCA]), control (sham RMCA procedure), exercise, and stroke-exercise. Beginning 48 hours post-stroke induction/sham operation, rats in the exercise group had 6 sessions of exercise in which they ran on a treadmill at grade 10 for 20 min/day at 10 m/min. At 8 days poststroke, all rats were anesthetized and soleus, plantaris, and gastrocnemius muscles were dissected from both the affected and unaffected sides. After 6 sessions of exercise following acute ischemic stroke, the stroke-exercise group showed the following significant (p < .05) increases compared to the stroke-only group: body weight and dietary intake, muscle weight of affected soleus and both affected and unaffected gastrocnemius muscle, Type I fiber cross-sectional area of affected soleus and both affected and unaffected gastrocnemius muscle, Type II fiber cross-sectional area of the unaffected soleus, both affected and unaffected plantaris and gastrocnemius muscle, Type II fiber distribution of affected gastrocnemius muscle, and myofibrillar protein content of both affected and unaffected soleus muscle. Daily low-intensity exercise following acute stroke attenuates hind-limb muscle atrophy in both affected and unaffected sides. The effects of exercise are more pronounced in the soleus and gastrocnemius as compared to the plantaris muscle.
    Biological Research for Nursing 01/2006; 7(3):163-74. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stroke patients experience functional changes resulting from muscle atrophy related to disuse, lack or limited neuronal stimulation, and undernutrition. Acute ischemic stroke is assumed to induce muscle atrophy. However, there is little information regarding muscle changes after acute stroke. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of inactivity and undernutrition after acute stroke on mass, myofibrillar protein content, and Types I and II fiber cross-sectional areas of rat hindlimb muscles. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight, 240-270 g) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a stroke group (n = 7) that had occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery, a control group (n = 7) that underwent a sham right middle cerebral artery procedure, and an undernourished group (n = 9) that was pair-fed to match the intake of stroke rats. Food and water intake as well as body weight were measured daily. The rats were anesthetized 7 days after occlusion or sham occlusion, after which the soleus (Type I), plantaris (Type II), and gastrocnemius (Type II) muscles were dissected from both the affected and unaffected sides. The brain was sectioned to identify cerebral infarction in the stroke group. Body weight, food intake, muscle weight, fiber type distribution, cross-sectional area, and myofibrillar protein content of the dissected muscles were determined. The stroke group at 7 days after ischemic stroke showed significant decreases (p <.05), as compared with the control rats, in diet intake and body weight, muscle weight of affected gastrocnemius, Type I fiber cross-sectional area of the affected soleus muscle, Types I and II fiber cross-sectional areas and Type II fiber distribution of the unaffected soleus muscle, and myofibrillar protein content of both the affected and unaffected soleus muscles. As compared with the control group, the undernourished group showed significant decreases (p <.05) in diet intake and body weight, Type I fiber cross-sectional area of the affected soleus muscle, Types I and II fiber cross-sectional areas and Type II fiber distribution of the unaffected soleus muscle, Type I fiber distribution of the affected gastrocnemius muscle, and myofibrillar protein content of both the affected and unaffected soleus muscles. As compared with the undernourished group, the stroke group showed significant decreases (p <.05) in muscle weight and Type II fiber distribution of the affected gastrocnemius muscle. There were no differences in muscle characteristics between the affected and unaffected hindlimb muscles at 7 days after ischemic stroke. Hindlimb muscle atrophy occurs in both affected and unaffected sides after acute stroke, with Type I muscle changes more apparent than Type II changes.
    Nursing Research 01/2004; 53(5):283-92. · 1.50 Impact Factor