Young Bae Sohn

Ajou University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (72)114.23 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) presents with primary skeletal manifestations such as tall stature, chest wall abnormality, and scoliosis. These primary skeletal manifestations affect the growth pattern in MFS. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use normal growth charts to evaluate the growth status of MFS. We aimed to develop disease-specific growth charts for Korean MFS patients and to use these growth charts for understanding the growth patterns in MFS and managing of patients with MFS. Anthropometric data were available from 187 males and 152 females with MFS through a retrospective review of medical records. Disease-specific growth charts were generated and 3, 25, 50, 75, and 97 percentiles were calculated using the LMS (refers to λ, μ, and σ, respectively) smoothing procedure for height and weight. Comparisons between MFS patients and the general population were performed using a one-sample t-test. With regard to the height, the 50th percentile of MFS is above the normative 97th percentile in both genders. With regard to the weight, the 50 percentile of MFS is above the normative 75th percentile in male and between the normative 50th percentile and the 75th percentile in female. The disease-specific growth charts for Korean patients with MFS can be useful for monitoring growth patterns, planning the timing of growth-reductive therapy, predicting adult height and recording responses to growth-reductive therapy.
    Journal of Korean Medical Science 07/2015; 30(7):911. DOI:10.3346/jkms.2015.30.7.911 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disease for which enzyme replacement therapy has proven to be effective. A switch-over clinical trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Abcertin® (ISU Abxis, Seoul, Korea) in subjects with type 1 Gaucher disease who were previously treated with imiglucerase. Five Korean patients with type 1 Gaucher disease were enrolled. Previous doses of imiglucerase ranged from 30 to 55 U/kg every other week. The same dose of Abcertin® was administered to all patients for 24 weeks. Primary efficacy endpoints were changes in hemoglobin levels and platelet counts, and the secondary efficacy endpoints included changes in liver and spleen volumes, serum biomarkers, skeletal status and bone mineral density (BMD). During the study period, no statistically significant changes were observed in all parameters including hemoglobin levels and platelet counts, liver and spleen volumes, skeletal status and BMD. Abcertin® administration was continued in three patients for another 24 weeks as an extension of the study. Hemoglobin levels and platelet counts were maintained in all three patients. In conclusion, the efficacy and safety of Abcertin® are similar to those of imiglucerase, and Abcertin® is an effective therapeutic agent for patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (Clinical Trial Registry No. NCT02053896 at www.clinicaltrials.gov).
    Journal of Korean medical science 04/2015; 30(4):378-84. DOI:10.3346/jkms.2015.30.4.378 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    Young Bae Sohn · Shin-Young Yim · Eun-Hae Cho · Ok-Hwa Kim
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    ABSTRACT: Potocki-Shaffer syndrome (PSS, OMIM #601224) is a rare contiguous gene deletion syndrome caused by haploinsufficiency of genes located on the 11p11.2p12. Affected individuals have a number of characteristic features including multiple exostoses, biparietal foramina, abnormalities of genitourinary system, hypotonia, developmental delay, and intellectual disability. We report here on the first Korean case of an 8-yr-old boy with PSS diagnosed by high resolution microarray. Initial evaluation was done at age 6 months because of a history of developmental delay, hypotonia, and dysmorphic face. Coronal craniosynostosis and enlarged parietal foramina were found on skull radiographs. At age 6 yr, he had severe global developmental delay. Multiple exostoses of long bones were detected during a radiological check-up. Based on the clinical and radiological features, PSS was highly suspected. Subsequently, chromosomal microarray analysis identified an 8.6 Mb deletion at 11p11.2 [arr 11p12p11.2 (Chr11:39,204,770-47,791,278)×1]. The patient continued rehabilitation therapy for profound developmental delay. The progression of multiple exostosis has being monitored. This case confirms and extends data on the genetic basis of PSS. In clinical and radiologic aspect, a patient with multiple exostoses accompanying with syndromic features, including craniofacial abnormalities and mental retardation, the diagnosis of PSS should be considered.
    Journal of Korean Medical Science 02/2015; 30(2):214-7. DOI:10.3346/jkms.2015.30.2.214 · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) present with short stature and obesity. The growth pattern of children with PWS is different from that of the healthy population. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use normal growth charts to evaluate the growth status of children with PWS. We aimed to develop disease-specific growth charts for height and weight for nongrowth hormone-treated Korean infants with PWS aged between 0 and 36 months and to use these growth charts for the evaluation and management of infants with PWS. We conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 122 infants with genetically confirmed PWS. Data on the patients’ height and weight measurements before they underwent growth hormone treatment were recorded. Disease-specific growth charts were generated and the 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th centiles were calculated using the LMS (refers to λ, μ, and σ, respectively) smoothing procedure for height and weight. The disease-specific growth charts for Korean infants with PWS can be used when examining infants with PWS and when evaluating their growth at later stages for comparison purposes. They are also useful for monitoring growth patterns, nutritional assessments, and recording responses to growth hormone treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 01/2015; 167(1). DOI:10.1002/ajmg.a.36816 · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schmid-type metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (MCDS) is characterized by short stature with short legs, bowing of the long bones, coxa vara, and waddling gait. MCDS is a relatively common form of MCD. Most mutations that cause MCDS occur within the carboxyl-terminal non-collagenous domain (NC1) of the COL10A1 gene. We performed mutational analysis of the COL10A1 genes in 4 unrelated Korean patients with diagnosed MCDS. Mutational analysis of COL10A1 identified c.1904_1915delinsT (p.Gln635LeufsX10) and c.1969dupG (p.Ala657GlyfsX10), 2 novel frameshift mutations, and c.2030T>A (p.Val677Glu) and c.862G>C (p.Gly288Arg) at unusual mutational sites, which could be pathogenic. We present the first report of the molecular characteristics of MCDS in 4 Korean patients. Our findings suggest that a novel sequence variation involving an unusual mutational site of the COL10A1 gene can cause mild MCDS. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
    European Journal of Medical Genetics 12/2014; 58(3). DOI:10.1016/j.ejmg.2014.12.011 · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders that are characterized by susceptibility to bone fractures, and range in severity from a subtle increase in fracture frequency to death in the perinatal period. Most patients have defects in type I collagen biosynthesis with autosomal dominant inheritance; but, many autosomal recessive genes have been reported. We applied whole exome sequencing to identify mutations in a Korean OI patient who had an umbilical hernia, frequent fractures, a markedly short stature, delayed motor development, scoliosis, and dislocation of the radial head, with a bowed radius and ulna. We identified two novel variants in the BMP1 gene: c.808A>G and c.1297G>T. The former variant caused a missense change p.(Met270Val) and the latter variant caused the skipping of exon 10. The hypo-functional nature of the two variants was demonstrated in a zebrafish assay.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Human Mutation 11/2014; 36(2). DOI:10.1002/humu.22731 · 5.05 Impact Factor
  • Young Bae Sohn · Sung Yoon Cho · Jieun Lee · Yonghee Kwun · Rimm Huh · Dong-Kyu Jin
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    ABSTRACT: Idursulfase beta (Hunterase®) has been used for enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome) aged 6 years or older since 2012 in Korea. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ERT with idursulfase beta in Hunter syndrome children younger than 6 years. This study was a 52-week, single center, single arm, open-label clinical trial (NCT01645189). Idursulfase beta (0.5 mg/kg/week) was administered intravenously for 52 weeks. The primary endpoint was safety assessed by adverse events (AEs). Secondary endpoints included vital signs, physical examination, ECG, laboratory tests, anti-idursulfase antibodies, and efficacy represented by changes in urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) at week 53 from baseline. In addition, growth indices and developmental milestones (Denver II test) were evaluated as exploratory variables. All six patients experienced at least one AE. A total of 109 AEs were reported. One patient experienced a serious AE (hospitalization due to gastroenteritis) that was considered not to be treatment related. One patient (16.7%), experienced infusion-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs), developing urticaria six times and a cough five times. There were no serious ADRs and no clinically significant changes in vital signs, physical exam, laboratory parameters, or ECG. Of the six patients, four (66.7%) showed anti-idursulfase antibodies and neutralizing antibodies on at least one occasion during the study. At week 53, urinary GAG was significantly reduced by -35.1 ± 30.6 mg GAG/g creatine from baseline (P = 0.038). This study indicates that the safety and efficacy of idursulfase beta are similar to those reported in Hunter syndrome patients aged 6 years or older.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 08/2014; 114(2). DOI:10.1016/j.ymgme.2014.08.009 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    Sung Yoon Cho · Young Bae Sohn · Dong-Kyu Jin
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    ABSTRACT: Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) is a constellation of disorders characterized by the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides in tissues and organs. This accumulation results in the deterioration and degeneration of multiple organs. This paper describes the general distribution of types of MPS in patients, their clinical characteristics and genotypes, the development of animal studies and preclinical studies, enzyme replacement therapy in South Korea, and the development of idursulfase beta and clinical trials on idursulfase beta in South Korea. In addition, this paper discusses academic collaboration among specialists in MPS care in the Asia-Pacific region, which includes Japan, Taiwan, Malaysia, and South Korea, through an organization called the Asia-Pacific MPS Network (APMN). The Asia-Pacific MPS Registry, an electronic remote data entry system, has been developed by key doctors in the APMN. Rare diseases require international cooperation and collaboration to elucidate their mechanisms and carry out clinical trials; therefore, an organization such as the APMN is required. Furthermore, international collaboration among Asian countries and countries around the world will be of utmost importance in the future.
    08/2014; 3(3):79-86. DOI:10.5582/irdr.2014.01013
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    ABSTRACT: Acrodysostosis without hormone resistance is a rare skeletal disorder characterized by brachydactyly, nasal hypoplasia, mental retardation and occasionally developmental delay. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding cAMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4D (PDE4D) have been reported to cause this rare condition but the pathomechanism has not been fully elucidated. To understand the pathogenetic mechanism of PDE4D mutations, we conducted 3D modeling studies to predict changes in the binding efficacy of cAMP to the catalytic pocket in PDE4D mutants. Our results indicated diminished enzyme activity in the two mutants we analysed (Gly673Asp and Ile678Thr; based on PDE4D4). Ectopic expression of PDE4D mutants in HEK293 cells demonstrated this reduction in activity, which was identified by increased cAMP levels. However, cells from an acrodysostosis patient showed low cAMP accumulation, which resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylated cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein (pCREB)/CREB ratio. The reason for this discrepancy was due to a compensatory increase in expression levels of PDE4A and PDE4B isoforms, which accounted for the paradoxical decrease in cAMP levels in the patient cells expressing mutant isoforms with lowered PDE4D activity. Skeletal radiographs of 10-week-old knockout (KO) rats showed that the distal part of the forelimb was shorter than in wild-type (WT) rats and that all the metacarpals and phalanges were also shorter in KO, as the name acrodysostosis implies. Like the G-protein α-stimulatory subunit and PRKAR1A, PDE4D critically regulates the cAMP signal transduction pathway and influences bone formation in a way that activity-compromising PDE4D mutations can result in skeletal dysplasia. We propose that specific inhibitory PDE4D mutations can lead to the molecular pathology of acrodysostosis without hormone resistance but that the pathological phenotype may well be dependent on an over-compensatory induction of other PDE4 isoforms that can be expected to be targeted to different signaling complexes and exert distinct effects on compartmentalised cAMP signalling.
    Cellular Signalling 07/2014; 26(11). DOI:10.1016/j.cellsig.2014.07.025 · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II, Hunter syndrome; OMIM 309900) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), leading to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). For enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of Hunter syndrome, two recombinant enzymes, idursulfase (Elaprase®, Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Lexington, MA) and idursulfase beta (Hunterase®, Green Cross Corporation, Yongin, Korea), are currently available in Korea. To compare the biochemical and physicochemical differences between idursulfase and idursulfase beta, we examined the formylglycine (FGly) content, specific enzyme activity, mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) content, sialic acid content, and in vitro cell uptake activity of normal human fibroblasts of these two enzymes.The FGly content, which determines the enzyme activity, of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (79.4 ± 0.9 vs. 68.1 ± 2.2 %, P < 0.001). In accordance with the FGly content, the specific enzyme activity of idursulfase beta was significantly higher than that of idursulfase (42.6 ± 1.1 vs. 27.8 ± 0.9 nmol/min/μg protein, P < 0.001). The levels of M6P and sialic acid were not significantly different (2.4 ± 0.1 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 mol/mol protein for M6P and 12.3 ± 0.7 vs. 12.4 ± 0.4 mol/mol protein for sialic acid). However, the cellular uptake activity of the normal human fibroblasts in vitro showed a significant difference (Kuptake, 5.09 ± 0.96 vs. 6.50 ± 1.28 nM protein, P = 0.017).In conclusion, idursulfase beta exhibited significantly higher specific enzyme activity than idursulfase, resulting from higher FGly content. These biochemical differences may be partly attributed to clinical efficacy. However, long-term clinical evaluations of Hunter syndrome patients treated with these two enzymes will be needed to demonstrate the clinical implications of significant difference of the enzyme activity and the FGly content.
    Glycoconjugate Journal 04/2014; 31(4). DOI:10.1007/s10719-014-9523-0 · 1.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiac systolic function is significantly decreased in a proportion of patients with Hunter syndrome. This study was performed to evaluate the change in myocardial function associated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in a mouse model of cardiomyopathy associated with Hunter syndrome. Thirty 9-week-old iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) knockout mice received either intravenous injection of human recombinant IDS (ERT group, N=15) or saline (control group, N=15) for 5weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and after treatment. Echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) systolic function and 2-dimensional radial and circumferential strain were assessed. At follow-up, there was a significant increase in LV fractional shortening and radial and circumferential strain in the ERT group only. Notable myocardial fibrosis was observed in the control group only. In the murine model of Hunter syndrome, ERT exerts beneficial effects on cardiac function, which can be evaluated by serial echocardiographic evaluation including 2-dimensional strain analysis.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 04/2014; 112(3). DOI:10.1016/j.ymgme.2014.04.005 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Kabuki syndrome (KS) (OMIM#147920) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome. Recently, pathogenic variants in KMT2D and KDM6A were identified as the causes of KS in 55.8-80.0% of patients. To elucidate further the molecular characteristics of Korean patients with KS, we screened a cohort of patients with clinically defined KS for mutations in KMT2D and KDM6A. Whole-exome sequencing and direct sequencing for validation were performed in 12 patients with a clinical suspicion of KS. KMT2D and KDM6A mutations were identified in 11 (91.7%) patients. No recurrent mutation was observed, and 10 out of the 11 mutations found were novel. KMT2D mutations were detected in 10 patients, including four small deletions or insertions and four nonsense and two missense mutations. One girl had a novel splice-site mutation in KDM6A. Each patient had a unique individual mutation. This is the first report of mutational analysis via exome sequencing in Korean patients with KS. Because the mutation-detection rate was high in this study, rigorous mutation analysis of KMT2D and KDM6A may be an important tool for the early diagnosis and genetic counseling of Korean patients with KS.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 17 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jhg.2014.25.
    Journal of Human Genetics 04/2014; 59(6). DOI:10.1038/jhg.2014.25 · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hunter syndrome (or mucopolysaccharidosis type II [MPS II]) arises because of a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase. Short stature is a prominent and consistent feature in MPS II. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with idursulfase (Elaprase®) or idursulfase beta (Hunterase®) have been developed for these patients. The effect of ERT on the growth of Korean patients with Hunter syndrome was evaluated at a single center. This study comprised 32 patients, who had received ERT for at least 2 yr; they were divided into three groups according to their ages at the start of ERT: group 1 (<6 yr, n=14), group 2 (6-10 yr, n=11), and group 3 (10-20 yr, n=7). The patients showed marked growth retardation as they got older. ERT may have less effect on the growth of patients with the severe form of Hunter syndrome. The height z-scores in groups 2 and 3 revealed a significant change (the estimated slopes before and after the treatment were -0.047 and -0.007, respectively: difference in the slope, 0.04; P<0.001). Growth in response to ERT could be an important treatment outcome or an endpoint for future studies. Graphical Abstract
    Journal of Korean medical science 02/2014; 29(2):254-60. DOI:10.3346/jkms.2014.29.2.254 · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • So Hyun Park · Ji Eun Lee · Young Bae Sohn · Jung Min Ko
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    ABSTRACT: Sotos syndrome (SS) is a congenital overgrowth syndrome. NSD1 mutations are identifiable in most SS patients. There have been a few reports of familial inheritance of SS worldwide, but no familial cases have been reported in Korea. A 6-month-old girl had tall stature and macrocephaly with mild ventricular enlargement, and showed mild delay in motor and language development. Her mother also had tall stature and a long narrow face. The baby and her mother were suspected of having familial SS. Chromosome 5q35 microdeletion was first ruled out by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, and direct sequencing of NSD1 revealed a novel heterozygous mutation in exon 22 (c.6356delA; p.Asp2119Valfs*31). This report describes, for the first time, a Korean family with two generations of SS resulting from a novel intragenic NSD1 mutation.
    Annals of clinical and laboratory science 01/2014; 44(2):228-31. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurological, cutaneous, and ophthalmological manifestations. A 33-year-old woman with typical symptoms of NF1 visited Ajou University Hospital. Screening of the whole-messenger RNA region of NF1 at the complementary DNA level by polymerase chain reaction-direct sequencing confirmed the presence of an NF1 mutation at the genomic level. The mutation analysis revealed an in-frame skipping of exon 46 (c.6757_6858del) caused by a point mutation (c. 6792C>A) in exon 46. In this report, we have described the first Korean case of a proband with NF1 that carries an allele with an exon 46 deletion caused by an exonic splicing enhancer site mutation, leading to the skipping of the whole of exon 46 (c.6757_6858del).
    01/2014; 11(1):40. DOI:10.5734/JGM.2014.11.1.40
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose This study analyzed and evaluated the demographic, clinical, and cytogenetic data [G-banded karyotyping and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH)] of patients with unexplained developmental delay or intellectual disability at a single Korean institution. Materials and Methods We collected clinical and cytogenetic data based on retrospective charts at Ajou University Medical Center, Suwon, Korea from April 2008 to March 2012. Results A total of 190 patients were identified. Mean age was 5.1±1.87 years. Array CGH yielded abnormal results in 26 of 190 patients (13.7%). Copy number losses were about two-fold more frequent than gains. A total of 61.5% of all patients had copy number losses. The most common deletion disorders included 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, 15q11.2q12 deletion and 18q deletion syndrome. Copy number gains were identified in 34.6% of patients, and common diseases among these included Potocki-Lupski syndrome, 15q11-13 duplication syndrome and duplication 22q. Abnormal karyotype with normal array CGH results was exhibited in 2.6% of patients; theses included balanced translocation (n=2), inversion (n=2) and low-level mosaicism (n=1). Facial abnormalities (p<0.001) and failure to thrive were (p<0.001) also more frequent in the group of patients with abnormal CGH findings. Conclusion Array CGH is a useful diagnostic tool in clinical settings in patients with developmental delay or intellectual disability combined with facial abnormalities or failure to thrive.
    Yonsei medical journal 11/2013; 54(6):1463-70. DOI:10.3349/ymj.2013.54.6.1463 · 1.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 21-year-old man with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) displayed short and clubbed fingers and marked eyebrow, which are typical of Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome (HCS). Laboratory findings confirmed type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). After conservative care with hydration and insulin supply, metabolic impairment was improved. Examinations of bone and metabolism revealed osteoporosis and craniofacial abnormalities. The mutation (c.6443T>G) of the NOTCH2 gene was found. The patient was diagnosed with HCS and DM. There may be a relationship between HCS and DM, with development of pancreatic symptoms related to the NOTCH2 gene mutation.
    Journal of Korean medical science 11/2013; 28(11):1682-1686. DOI:10.3346/jkms.2013.28.11.1682 · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology 10/2013; 2013(Suppl 1):P52. DOI:10.1186/1687-9856-2013-S1-P52
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is defined as resistance toward parathyroid hormones. PHP and pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP) are rare disorders resulting from genetic and epigenetic aberrations within or upstream of the GNAS locus. This study investigated the clinical characteristics and performed a molecular analysis of PHP and PPHP.A total of 12 patients with (P)PHP from 11 unrelated families (4 with PHP-Ia, 6 with PHP-Ib, and 2 with PPHP) were characterized using both clinical and molecular methods. Clinical features included the presenting symptoms, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy features, and resistance to hormones. Comprehensive analysis of the GNAS and STX16 loci was undertaken to investigate the molecular defects underlying (P)PHP.All PHP-Ib patients displayed hypocalcemic symptoms. All PHP-Ia patients showed resistance toward TSH, in addition to PTH. In most patients with PHP, when the diagnosis of PHP was first established, hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia were associated with a significant increase in serum PTH levels. One patient with PHP-Ia was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency and showed a good response to human recombinant growth hormone therapy. 6 patients with PHP-Ia and PPHP showed 5 different mutations in the GNAS gene. 5 patients with PHP-Ib displayed a loss of differentially methylated region (DMR) imprints of the maternal GNAS. One PHP-Ib patient showed a de novo microdeletion in STX16 and a loss of methylation of exon A/B on the maternal allele. No patients revealed paternal disomy among 4 patients with PHP-Ib.Identification of the molecular causes of PHP and PPHP explains their distinctive clinical features and enables confirmation of the diagnosis and exact genetic counseling.
    Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes 10/2013; 121(9):539-545. DOI:10.1055/s-0033-1349867 · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The natural progression of the severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis II in children is a rapid decline of neurodevelopmental function with hydrocephalus. Recombinant human iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) under a standard regimen seems to have limited effect. Therefore, we determined whether early, high-dose ERT attenuated ventriculomegaly and histologic abnormalities in the brains of IdS-knockout mice. IdS-knockout mice received saline or recombinant human IdS (0.5/1.0/2.0 mg kg(-1)) intravenously once weekly, starting at 4 weeks of age and continuing until 20 weeks. ERT with 2.0 mg kg(-1), but not 0.5 or 1.0 mg kg(-1), significantly attenuated enlarged ventricles, as confirmed by in vivo 7-teslar brain magnetic reasonance image (MRI) at 20 weeks. However, neuronal cytoplasmic vacuolization and morphological alteration in the purkinje cells on brain histology and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels in brain homogenates were reduced in mice receiving ERT at lower dose than 2.0 mg kg(-1). Additionally, GAG levels significantly correlated with the percent volume ratio of ventricle to whole brain. These results suggested that high-dose systemic ERT started early in life could be a promising therapeutic modality for improving neurologic dysfunction including ventriculomegaly in children with severe Hunter syndrome.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 5 September 2013; doi:10.1038/jhg.2013.92.
    Journal of Human Genetics 09/2013; DOI:10.1038/jhg.2013.92 · 2.53 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

175 Citations
114.23 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2015
    • Ajou University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • National Cancer Center Korea
      Kōyō, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • 2014
    • Ajou University Medical Center
      수원시, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • 2009–2012
    • Sungkyunkwan University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2008–2012
    • Samsung Medical Center
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea