Gina Ancora

Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (50)122.42 Total impact

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    Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition 07/2014; 99(4):F321-4. DOI:10.1136/archdischild-2013-305165 · 3.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pain is an adverse effect that must be prevented and controlled at any age. Numerous guidelines consider the administration of sweet solutions as a standard of care for controlling pain during minor invasive procedures in neonates (1,2). According to the latest Cochrane Review, sucrose is safe and effective in reducing single episodes of minor procedural pain (3). It reduces behavioural expressions of pain and crying time, as well as the scores obtained using validated neonatal pain scales such as the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scale (4). The PIPP has been universally accepted as being capable of detecting and measuring the presence of acute pain, even in very preterm infants (5). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Acta Paediatrica 10/2013; 103(2). DOI:10.1111/apa.12459 · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: MRI, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be of great prognostic value in term newborns with moderate-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Currently, no data are available on (1)H-MRS and DTI performed in the subacute phase after hypothermic treatment. The aim of the present study was to assess their prognostic value in newborns affected by moderate-severe HIE and treated with selective brain cooling (BC). METHODS: Twenty infants treated with BC underwent conventional MRI and (1)H-MRS at a mean (SD) age of 8.3 (2.8) days; 15 also underwent DTI. Peak area ratios of metabolites and DTI variables, namely mean diffusivity (MD), axial and radial diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (FA), were calculated. Clinical outcome was monitored until 2 years of age. RESULTS: Adverse outcome was observed in 6/20 newborns. Both (1)H-MRS and DTI variables showed higher prognostic accuracy than conventional MRI. N-acetylaspartate/creatine at a basal ganglia localisation showed 100 % PPV and 93 % NPV for outcome. MD showed significantly decreased values in many regions of white and gray matter, axial diffusivity showed the best predictive value (PPV and NPV) in the genu of corpus callosum (100 and 91 %, respectively), and radial diffusivity was significantly decreased in fronto white matter (FWM) and fronto parietal (FP) WM. The decrement of FA showed the best AUC (0.94) in the FPWM. CONCLUSION: Selective BC in HIE neonates does not affect the early and accurate prognostic value of (1)H-MRS and DTI, which outperform conventional MRI.
    Neuroradiology 05/2013; 55(8). DOI:10.1007/s00234-013-1202-5 · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To assess the diagnostic and prognostic value of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in comparison with that of cerebral ultrasound (cUS) in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome in newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Methods: Forty CMV-congenitally infected newborns underwent cUS and cMRI within the first month of life. Clinical course, laboratory findings, visual/hearing function and neurodevelopmental outcome were documented. Results: Thirty newborns showed normal cMRI, cUS and hearing/visual function in the first month of life; none showed CMV-related abnormalities at follow-up. Six newborns showed pathological cMRI and cUS findings (pseudocystis, ventriculomegaly, calcifications, cerebellar hypoplasia) but cMRI provided additional information (white matter abnormalities in three cases, lissencephaly/polymicrogyria in one and a cyst of the temporal lobe in another one); cerebral calcifications were detected in 3/6 infants by cUS but only in 2/6 by cMRI. Four of these 6 infants showed severe neurodevelopmental impairment and five showed deafness during follow-up. Three newborns had a normal cUS, but cMRI documented white matter abnormalities and in one case also cerebellar hypoplasia; all showed neurodevelopmental impairment and two were deaf at follow-up. One more newborn showed normal cUS and cMRI, but brainstem auditory evoked responses were abnormal; psychomotor development was normal at follow-up. Conclusions: Compared with cUS, cMRI disclosed additional pathological findings in CMV-congenitally infected newborns. cUS is a readily available screening tool useful in the identification of infected newborns with major cerebral involvement. Further studies with a larger sample size are needed to determine the prognostic role of MRI, particularly regarding isolated white matter lesions.
    Brain & development 05/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.braindev.2013.04.001 · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the analgesic superiority and the safety equivalence of continuous fentanyl infusions versus fentanyl boluses in preterm infants on mechanical ventilation. STUDY DESIGN: In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial, mechanically ventilated newborns (≤32(+6) weeks gestational age) were randomized to fentanyl (continuous infusion of fentanyl plus open-label boluses of fentanyl) or placebo (continuous infusion of placebo plus open-label boluses of fentanyl). The primary endpoint was analgesic efficacy, as evaluated by the Echelle Douleur Inconfort Nouveau-Né (EDIN) and Premature Infant Pain Profile scales. Safety variables were evaluated as well. RESULTS: Sixty-four infants were allocated to the fentanyl group, and 67 were allocated to the placebo group. The need for open-label boluses of fentanyl was similar in the 2 groups (P = .949). EDIN scores were comparable in the 2 groups; 65 of 961 (6.8%) EDIN scores were >6 in the fentanyl group and 91 of 857 (10.6%) in the placebo group (P = .003). The median Premature Infant Pain Profile score was clinically and statistically higher in the placebo group compared with the fentanyl group on days 1, 2, and 3 of treatment (P < .05). Mechanical ventilation at age 1 week was required in 27 of 64 infants in the fentanyl group (42.2%), compared with 17 of 67 infants in the placebo group (25.4%) (P = .042). The first cycle of mechanical ventilation was longer and the first meconium passage occurred later in the fentanyl group (P = .019 and .027, respectively). CONCLUSION: In very preterm infants on mechanical ventilation, continuous fentanyl infusion plus open-label boluses of fentanyl does not reduce prolonged pain, but does reduce acute pain and increase side effects compared with open-label boluses of fentanyl alone.
    The Journal of pediatrics 04/2013; 163(3). DOI:10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.02.039 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: National and international guidelines have been published on pain control and prevention in the newborn, but data on compliance with these guidelines are lacking. AIM: To document current hospital practices for analgesia at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) 5 years after national guidelines were published in Italy. METHODS: A computer-based questionnaire was sent to all registered Italian level II and level III NICUs to investigate their routine pain control practices. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The analgesia and sedation currently used for invasive procedures as compared with best practices. RESULTS: The questionnaire was returned by 103 of the 118 NICUs (87.3%), most of which (85.4%) knew of the national guidelines on procedural pain control and prevention, and used some analgesic measures during invasive procedures. One or more nonpharmacological interventions were only used routinely by 64.1% of the NICUs for heel pricks and venipuncture, 56.0% for percutaneous insertion of central catheters, 69.7% for nasal CPAP, and 62.4% for eye tests to screen for retinopathy of prematurity. Pain medication was routinely administered at 34.3% NICUs for tracheal intubation, 46.6% for mechanical ventilation (MV), 12.9% for tracheal aspiration, 71.4% for chest tube insertion, 33.0% for lumbar puncture, and 64.0% for postoperative pain. Pain was routinely monitored at only 22.7% of the units during MV, 12.1% for nCPAP, and 21.8% postoperatively. CONCLUSION: This survey showed that most Italian NICUs provide some form of analgesia and sedation for invasive procedures in accordance with national guidelines, but their routine adherence to best practices for pain control and monitoring is still suboptimal.
    Pediatric Anesthesia 01/2013; 23(5). DOI:10.1111/pan.12107 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To ascertain the extent to which neonatal analgesia for invasive procedures has changed in the last 5 years since the publication of Italian guidelines. Methods: We compared survey data for the years 2004 and 2010 on analgesia policy and practices for common invasive procedures at Italian Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs); 75 NICUs answered questionnaires for both years and formed the object of this analysis. Results: By 2010 analgesia practices for procedural pain had improved significantly for almost all invasive procedures (p < 0.05), both non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods being adopted by the majority of NICUs (unlike the situation in 2004). The routine use of medication for major invasive procedures was still limited, however (35% of lumbar punctures, 40% of tracheal intubations, 46% during mechanical ventilation). Postoperative pain treatment was still inadequate, and 41% of facilities caring for patients after surgery did not treat pain routinely. Pain monitoring had definitely improved since 2004 (p < 0.05), but not enough: only 21% and 17% of NICUs routinely assess pain during mechanical ventilation and after surgery, respectively. Conclusion: There have been improvements in neonatal analgesia practices in Italy since national guidelines were published, but pain is still undertreated and underscored, especially during major invasive procedures. It is mandatory to address the gap between the recommendations in the guidelines and clinical practice must be addressed through with effective quality improvement initiatives.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 10/2012; 26(3). DOI:10.3109/14767058.2012.733783 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To ascertain the extent to which neonatal analgesia for invasive procedures has changed in the last 5 years since the publication of Italian guidelines. Methods: We compared survey data for the years 2004 and 2010 on analgesia policy and practices for common invasive procedures at Italian Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs); 75 NICUs answered questionnaires for both years and formed the object of this analysis. Results: By 2010, analgesia practices for procedural pain had improved significantly for almost all invasive procedures (p < 0.05), with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological methods being adopted by the majority of NICUs (unlike the situation in 2004). The routine use of medication for major invasive procedures was still limited, however (35% of lumbar punctures, 40% of tracheal intubations, 46% during mechanical ventilation). Postoperative pain treatment was still inadequate, and 41% of facilities caring for patients after surgery did not treat pain routinely. Pain monitoring had definitely improved since 2004 (p < 0.05), but not enough: only 21 and 17% of NICUs routinely assess pain during mechanical ventilation and after surgery, respectively. Conclusion: There have been improvements in neonatal analgesia practices in Italy since national guidelines were published, but pain is still undertreated and underscored, especially during major invasive procedures. It is mandatory to address the gap between the recommendations in the guidelines and clinical practice must be addressed through with effective quality improvement initiatives.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 10/2012; 25 Suppl 4:140-2. DOI:10.3109/14767058.2012.725973 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infants receiving respiratory assistance may feel pain due to underlying disease or ventilation itself. Pain control during neonatal respiratory care reduces morbidity. This article summarizes the main scientific evidence about the use of drugs during ventilatory assistance, and provides some practical suggestions on pain management in neonates with respiratory support.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 10/2012; 25 Suppl 4:80-2. DOI:10.3109/14767058.2012.715036 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Brain Cooling (BC) represents the elective treatment in asphyxiated newborns. Amplitude Integrated Electroencephalography (aEEG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) monitoring may help to evaluate changes in cerebral electrical activity and cerebral hemodynamics during hypothermia. Objectives: To evaluate the prognostic value of aEEG time course and NIRS data in asphyxiated cooled infants. Methods: Twelve term neonates admitted to our NICU with moderate-severe Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) underwent selective BC. aEEG and NIRS monitoring were started as soon as possible and maintained during the whole hypothermic treatment. Follow-up was scheduled at regular intervals; adverse outcome was defined as death, cerebral palsy (CP) or global quotient <88.7 at Griffiths' Scale. Results: 2/12 Infants died, 2 developed CP, 1 was normal at 6months of age and then lost at follow-up and 7 showed a normal outcome at least at 1year of age. The aEEG background pattern at 24h of life was abnormal in 10 newborns; only 4 of them developed an adverse outcome, whereas the 2 infants with a normal aEEG developed normally. In infants with adverse outcome NIRS showed a higher Tissue Oxygenation Index (TOI) than those with normal outcome (80.0±10.5% vs 66.9±7.0%, p=0.057; 79.7±9.4% vs 67.1±7.9%, p=0.034; 80.2±8.8% vs 71.6±5.9%, p=0.069 at 6, 12 and 24h of life, respectively). Conclusions: The aEEG background pattern at 24h of life loses its positive predictive value after BC implementation; TOI could be useful to predict early on infants that may benefit from other innovative therapies.
    Brain & development 11/2011; 35(1). DOI:10.1016/j.braindev.2011.09.008 · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: Brain cooling (BC) represents the elective treatment in asphyctic newborns. aEEG and NIRS monitoring may help to evaluate changes in cerebral electrical activity and cerebral hemodynamics during hypothermia.
    Pediatric Research 11/2011; 70:123-123. DOI:10.1038/pr.2011.348 · 2.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT:   Surfactant given during brief intubation followed by immediate extubation on nasal continuous positive airway pressure [Intubation-Surfactant-Extubation (InSurE) approach] is used to treat respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Our aim was to evaluate whether bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) after InSurE failure is able to prevent the need for mechanical ventilation (MV).   Chart data of infants with a birth weight <1500 gr or GA <32weeks undergoing InSurE in the period 2002-2008 in an Italian Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were reviewed retrospectively. InSurE failure was defined as follows: FiO(2) >0.4, respiratory acidosis or intractable apnoea within 1 week. After InSurE failure, newborns born before the implementation of BiPAP (historical control group) received MV, whereas those born after BiPAP implementation (BiPAP group) received BiPAP and underwent MV only if failure criteria persisted. The two groups were compared to evaluate whether BiPAP reduced the need for MV in the 7 days after InSurE failure. Six of twenty-two (27%) and 14 of the 38 (37%) infants failed InSurE in the two groups, respectively (p > 0.05). Need for MV was 27% in the historical control group versus 0% in the BiPAP group (risk estimate, 3.38; 95% CI, 2.24, 5.09; p = 0.001). Conclusions:  BiPAP reduced the need for MV after InSurE failure.
    Acta Paediatrica 12/2010; 99(12):1807-11. DOI:10.1111/j.1651-2227.2010.01910.x · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brain damage following a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult has been documented by different diagnostic techniques. The aim of the present study was to relate a-EEG time course during the first 24h of life to brain metabolic changes detected by proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 7-10days of life and to evaluate their correlation with outcome. Thirty-two patients with any grade HI encephalopathy were studied. Thirty-one out of 32 patients survived and underwent (1)H-MRS examination at 7-10days of life; a-EEG was recorded during the first 24h of life in 27/32 newborns; 26 patients underwent both examinations. Griffiths test, evaluation of motor skills, visual and hearing function were performed at regular intervals until the age of 2years. a-EEG at 6, 12 and 24h of life showed a significant correlation with outcome. N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (Cr), Lactate/Cr and myo-inositol differed significantly between patients with normal or poor outcome. a-EEG time course during the first 24h of life showed improvement in newborns with normal (1)H-MRS and good outcome and a deterioration in those with abnormal (1)H-MRS and poor outcome. a-EEG time course may be able to document the severity and the evolution of the cerebral damage following an HI event. a-EEG is related to the severity of cerebral injury as defined by (1)H-MRS and both examinations showed a good correlation with outcome. These data, obtained in non-cooled infants, may represent reference data for future investigations in cooled infants.
    Brain & development 11/2010; 32(10):835-42. DOI:10.1016/j.braindev.2009.11.008 · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early surfactant followed by extubation to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) compared with later surfactant and mechanical ventilation (MV) reduce the need for MV, air leaks, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. This randomized, controlled trial investigated whether prophylactic surfactant followed by nCPAP compared with early nCPAP application with early selective surfactant would reduce the need for MV in the first 5 days of life. A total of 208 inborn infants who were born at 25 to 28 weeks' gestation and were not intubated at birth were randomly assigned to prophylactic surfactant or nCPAP within 30 minutes of birth. Outcomes were assessed within the first 5 days of life and until death or discharge of the infants from hospital. Thirty-three (31.4%) infants in the prophylactic surfactant group needed MV in the first 5 days of life compared with 34 (33.0%) in the nCPAP group (risk ratio: 0.95 [95% confidence interval: 0.64-1.41]; P = .80). Death and type of survival at 28 days of life and 36 weeks' postmenstrual age and incidence of main morbidities of prematurity (secondary outcomes) were similar in the 2 groups. A total of 78.1% of infants in the prophylactic surfactant group and 78.6% in the nCPAP group survived in room air at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age. Prophylactic surfactant was not superior to nCPAP and early selective surfactant in decreasing the need for MV in the first 5 days of life and the incidence of main morbidities of prematurity in spontaneously breathing very preterm infants on nCPAP.
    PEDIATRICS 06/2010; 125(6):e1402-9. DOI:10.1542/peds.2009-2131 · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Protein content of preterm human milk (HM) is relatively low and extremely variable among mothers: thus, recommended protein intake is rarely met. To evaluate in a NICU setting if HM protein content after standard fortification meets the recommended intake, and also to check the effect of fortification on the osmolality of HM, as an index of feeding intolerance. Protein content of 34 preterm HM samples was evaluated by a bedside technique (Near-Infrared-Reflectance-Analysis - NIRA); osmolality was also checked. Seventeen samples were fortified with Aptamil BMF, Milupa (Group A) and 17 with FM85, Nestlé (Group B). Fortification was performed as recommended by the manufacturer ("full fortification [FF]") and also with a lower amount of fortifier ("low-dose fortification [LF]"). After fortification, actual protein content was calculated and compared to that needed to meet recommended intake (2.33-3g/dl), and osmolality was measured. After FF, protein content was above 3g/dl in none of the samples, and below 2.33 g/dl in 16/34 samples (11 in Group A, 5 in Group B). After LF, protein content was above 3g/dl in none of the samples and below 2.33 g/dl in 32/34 samples (15 in Group A, 17 in Group B). Osmolality exceeded 400 mOsm/kg in 19 samples after FF (10 in Group A, 9 in Group B) and in 2/34 samples after LF (1 in each group). HM protein content after standard fortification fails to meet the recommended intake for preterm infants in approximately half of the cases.
    Early human development 04/2010; 86(4):237-40. DOI:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2010.04.001 · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To provide recent figures on the occurrence of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) from a Teaching Hospital. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary level university hospital with more than 3000 deliveries annually. Twenty-four cases of NHIE that occurred in apparently low-risk pregnancies were analysed and compared to a group of controls for the most common labor variables. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Of 15,371 apparently low-risk deliveries, 24 cases of NHIE were observed (0.16%), with perinatal death or cerebral palsy occurring in nine of these cases (0.06%). The following intra-partum variables were significantly more common in cases than in controls: stained amniotic fluid (OR: 7.50; 95% CI:1.77-31.79), maternal fever (none in the control group), abnormal CTG (OR: 253.0; 95% CI: 26.70-2397), persistent occiput posterior (OR: 15.67; 95% CI: 2.25-104.53) and operative delivery (OR: 3.98; 95% CI: 1.39-11.33). The incidence of NHIE is considerably low in a Tertiary care Centre.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 11/2009; 23(6):516-21. DOI:10.3109/14767050903186293 · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changes in head posture influence brain hemodynamics. Optimal positioning has been recommended as 1 of 10 potentially better practices to reduce the incidence of brain injury in preterm newborns. The aim of this study was to evaluate by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the effect of different head and body positions and the influence of gestational age (GA) and nasal continuous positive airway pressure on brain hemodynamics in very preterm newborns. 24 stable preterm newborns were studied by NIRS in 6 different postures including head rotation and head inclination in both supine and prone positions. Changes in normalized tissue hemoglobin index (nTHI) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) were measured after posture variations. No statistically significant changes in nTHI and in TOI were found in the 6 postures. nTHI variations, expression of cerebral blood volume variations, were influenced by GA. A reduction in nTHI, with a stable TOI, in the less mature infants (with GA < or = 26 weeks), occurred on head rotation; nTHI increased again when the head was derotated. Hemodynamic changes after posture variations depend on GA. Head rotation in newborns with GA < or = 26 weeks produced a reduction in nTHI with stable TOI. Possible physiopathological mechanisms are discussed.
    Neonatology 10/2009; 97(3):212-7. DOI:10.1159/000253149 · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite accumulating evidence that procedural pain experienced by newborn infants may have acute and even long-term detrimental effects on their subsequent behaviour and neurological outcome, pain control and prevention remain controversial issues. Our aim was to develop guidelines based on evidence and clinical practice for preventing and controlling neonatal procedural pain in the light of the evidence-based recommendations contained in the SIGN classification. A panel of expert neonatologists used systematic review, data synthesis and open discussion to reach a consensus on the level of evidence supported by the literature or customs in clinical practice and to describe a global analgesic management, considering pharmacological, non-pharmacological, behavioural and environmental measures for each invasive procedure. There is strong evidence to support some analgesic measures, e.g. sucrose or breast milk for minor invasive procedures, and combinations of drugs for tracheal intubation. Many other pain control measures used during chest tube placement and removal, screening and treatment for ROP, or for postoperative pain, are still based not on evidence, but on good practice or expert opinions. Conclusion: These guidelines should help improving the health care professional's awareness of the need to adequately manage procedural pain in neonates, based on the strongest evidence currently available.
    Acta Paediatrica 07/2009; 98(6):932-9. DOI:10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01291.x · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: : Preterm human milk (HM) may provide insufficient energy and nutrients and thus may need to be fortified. Our aim was to determine whether fat content, protein content, and osmolality of HM before and after fortification may affect gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in symptomatic preterm infants. : Gastroesophageal reflux was evaluated in 17 symptomatic preterm newborns fed naïve and fortified HM by combined pH/intraluminal-impedance monitoring (pH-MII). Human milk fat and protein content was analysed by a near-infrared reflectance analysis. Human milk osmolality was tested before and after fortification. Gastroesophageal reflux indexes measured before and after fortification were compared and were also related to HM fat and protein content and osmolality before and after fortification. : An inverse correlation was found between naïve HM protein content and acid reflux index (RIpH: P = 0.041, rho =-0.501). After fortification, osmolality often exceeded the values recommended for infant feeds; furthermore, a statistically significant (P < 0.05) increase in nonacid reflux indexes was observed. : Protein content of naïve HM may influence acid GER in preterm infants. A standard fortification of HM may worsen nonacid GER indexes and, due to the extreme variability in HM composition, may overcome both recommended protein intake and HM osmolality. Thus, an individualised fortification, based on the analysis of the composition of naïve HM, could optimise both nutrient intake and feeding tolerance.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 07/2009; 49(5):613-8. DOI:10.1097/MPG.0b013e31819c0ce5 · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amplitude integrated EEG (aEEG) and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) were applied in a newborn with a moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy before, during and after brain cooling. At 2h of life a selective head cooling with mild systemic hypothermia was started and maintained for 72h. aEEG background pattern improved from severely abnormal to normal during the first 17h of life. NIRS revealed a reduction in cerebral blood volume (CBV) during hypothermia that recovered during the rewarming period, whereas brain oxygenation remained stable. As brain cooling is supposed to reduce delayed hyperemia and help to maintain neuronal metabolism following cerebral insults, aEEG and NIRS monitoring may be useful during hypothermic treatment in order to document changes in CBV and brain oxygenation possibly reflecting the efficacy of hypothermia.
    Brain & development 06/2009; 31(6):442-4. DOI:10.1016/j.braindev.2008.06.003 · 1.54 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

594 Citations
122.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2013
    • Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 1990–2013
    • University of Bologna
      • • Section of Microbiology and Virology
      • • Institute of Haematology
      • • Institute of Cancerology
      Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy