Bona Kim

Korea University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (5)16.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence has suggested that human skin fibroblasts may represent a novel source of therapeutic stem cells. In this study, we report a 3-stage method to induce the differentiation of skin fibroblasts into insulin- producing cells (IPCs). In stage 1, we establish the isolation, expansion and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from human labia minora dermis- derived fibroblasts (hLMDFs) (stage 1: MSC expansion). hLMDFs express the typical mesenchymal stem cell marker proteins and can differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or muscle cells. In stage 2, DMEM/F12 serum-free medium with ITS mix (insulin, transferrin, and selenite) is used to induce differentiation of hLMDFs into endoderm-like cells, as determined by the expression of the endoderm markers Sox17, Foxa2, and PDX1 (stage 2: mesenchymal-endoderm transition). In stage 3, cells in the mesenchymal- endoderm transition stage are treated with nicotinamide in order to further differentiate into self-assembled, 3-dimensional islet cell-like clusters that express multiple genes related to pancreatic β-cell development and function (stage 3: IPC). We also found that the transplantation of IPCs can normalize blood glucose levels and rescue glucose homeostasis in streptozotocin- induced diabetic mice. These results indicate that hLMDFs have the capacity to differentiate into functionally competent IPCs and represent a potential cell-based treatment for diabetes mellitus.
    Experimental and Molecular Medicine 01/2012; 44(1):26-35. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we report the isolation and characterization of a population of multipotent keloid-derived mesenchymal-like stem cells (KMLSCs) from keloid scalp tissues. These KMLSCs expressed the typical mesenchymal stem cell marker proteins CD13, CD29, CD44, CD90, fibronectin, and vimentin when they were cultured in serum-containing medium and when subsequent exposure to various differentiation media resulted in their differentiation into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, smooth muscle cells, and angiogenic endothelial cells. When KMLSCs were cultured in neural stem culture conditions (i.e., in the presence of epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 2 in substrate-free conditions), they produced large numbers of neurospheres containing nestin-, CD133-, and SOX2-positive cells that expressed neural-crest stem cell markers. Subsequent exposure of these cells to different differentiation conditions resulted in cells that expressed neuronal cell-, astrocyte-, oligodendrocyte-, or Schwann cell-specific markers. Our study suggests that KMLSCs may be an alternative adult stem cell resource for regenerative tissue repair and auto-transplantation.
    Stem cells and development 09/2008; 17(4):713-24. · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, Bmi1 was shown to control the proliferation and self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we demonstrated the induction of NSC-like cells (NSCLCs) from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1 under NSC culture conditions. These NSCLCs exhibited the morphology and growth properties of NSCs, and expressed NSC marker genes, including nestin, CD133, and Sox2. In vitro differentiation of NSCLCs resulted in differentiated cell populations containing astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Following treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A and valproic acid), the potential of NSCLCs for proliferation, dedifferentiation, and self-renewal was significantly inhibited. Our data indicate that multipotent NSCLCs can be generated directly from astrocytes by the addition of Bmi1.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 07/2008; · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Keloids are benign skin tumors characterized by collagen accumulation and hyperproliferation of fibroblasts. To find an effective therapy for keloids, we explored the pharmacological potential of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a widely investigated tumor-preventive agent. When applied to normal and keloid fibroblasts (KFs) in vitro, proliferation and migration of KFs were more strongly suppressed by EGCG than normal fibroblast proliferation and migration (IC(50): 54.4 microM (keloid fibroblast (KF)) versus 63.0 microM (NF)). The level of Smad2/3, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), and p38 phosphorylation is more enhanced in KFs, and EGCG inhibited phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and STAT3 (Tyr705 and Ser727). To evaluate the contribution of these pathways to keloid pathology, we treated KFs with specific inhibitors for PI3K, ERK1/2, or STAT3. Although a PI3K inhibitor significantly suppressed proliferation, PI3K and MEK/ERK inhibitors had a minor effect on migration and collagen production. However, a JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor and a STAT3 siRNA strongly suppressed proliferation, migration, and collagen production by KFs. We also found that treatment with EGCG suppressed growth and collagen production in the in vivo keloid model. This study demonstrates that EGCG suppresses the pathological characteristics of keloids through inhibition of the STAT3-signaling pathway. We propose that EGCG has potential in the treatment and prevention of keloids.
    Journal of Investigative Dermatology 06/2008; 128(10):2429-41. · 6.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we examined the expression and functions of serum amyloid A (SAA) isoforms during apoptosis of HC11 mammary gland epithelial cells. Expression of SAA mRNAs and apoptosis were increased in HC11 cells by serum withdrawal and gradually decreased upon the addition of serum, or epidermal growth factor (EGF). TNFalpha treatment of HC11 cells also induced expression of SAA genes, and the effect on SAA1 and SAA2 expression was suppressed by treatment with MG132, and in cells transfected with a dominant negative mutant form of IkappaBalpha. Similar results were observed in response to interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6 and interferon gamma (IFNgamma). Furthermore, overexpression of the SAA1 and SAA2 isoforms suppressed growth and accelerated apoptosis of HC11 cells by increasing caspase 3/7 and caspase 8 activities, but the apoptotic effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) on HC11 cells was not enhanced. We found that expression of SAA1 and SAA2, but not SAA3, was regulated by an NFkappaB-dependent pathway, and that overexpression of SAA isoforms accelerated the apoptosis of HC11 cells.
    Bioscience Biotechnology and Biochemistry 02/2008; 72(1):70-81. · 1.27 Impact Factor