Susanne Lucae

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, München, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (132)885.51 Total impact

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    Molecular Psychiatry 02/2015; 20(2):207-214. DOI:10.1038/mp.2013.195 · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is an Hsp90 co-chaperone and regulator of the glucocorticoid receptor, and consequently of stress physiology. Clinical studies suggest a genetic link between FKBP51 and antidepressant response in mood disorders; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of FKBP51 in the actions of antidepressants, with a particular focus on pathways of autophagy.
    PLoS Medicine 11/2014; 11(11):e1001755. DOI:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001755 · 14.00 Impact Factor
  • Biological psychiatry 10/2014; 76(7). DOI:10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.01.022 · 8.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic factors play as large a role as environmental factors in the etiology of alcohol dependence. Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) enable systematic searches for loci not hitherto implicated in the etiology of alcohol dependence, many true findings may be missed due to correction for multiple testing. The aim of the present study was to circumvent this limitation by searching for biological system-level differences, and then following up these findings in humans and animals. Gene-set based analysis of GWAS data from 1333 cases and 2168 controls identified 19 significantly associated gene-sets of which five could be replicated in an independent sample. Clustered in these gene-sets were novel and previously identified susceptibility genes. The most frequently present gene, ie in 6 out of 19 gene-sets, was X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 5 (XRCC5). Previous human and animal studies have implicated XRCC5 in alcohol sensitivity. This phenotype is inversely correlated with the development of alcohol dependence, presumably since more alcohol is required to achieve the desired effects. In the present study, the functional role of XRCC5 in alcohol dependence was further validated in animals and humans. Drosophila mutants with reduced function of Ku80-the homolog of mammalian XRCC5-due to RNAi silencing showed reduced sensitivity to ethanol. In humans with free access to intravenous ethanol self-administration in the laboratory, the maximum achieved blood alcohol concentration was influenced in an allele-dose dependent manner by genetic variation in XRCC5. In conclusion, our convergent approach identified new candidates and generated independent evidence for the involvement of XRCC5 in alcohol dependence.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 18 July 2014; doi:10.1038/npp.2014.178.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 07/2014; 40(2). DOI:10.1038/npp.2014.178 · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological studies have recognized a genetic diathesis for suicidal behavior, which is independent of other psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on suicide attempt (SA) and ideation have failed to identify specific genetic variants. Here, we conduct further GWAS and for the first time, use polygenic score analysis in cohorts of patients with mood disorders, to test for common genetic variants for mood disorders and suicide phenotypes. Genome-wide studies for SA were conducted in the RADIANT and GSK-Munich recurrent depression samples and London Bipolar Affective Disorder Case-Control Study (BACCs) then meta-analysis was performed. A GWAS on suicidal ideation during antidepressant treatment had previously been conducted in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) study. We derived polygenic scores from each sample and tested their ability to predict SA in the mood disorder cohorts or ideation status in the GENDEP study. Polygenic scores for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium were used to investigate pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and suicide phenotypes. No significant evidence for association was detected at any SNP in GWAS or meta-analysis. Polygenic scores for major depressive disorder significantly predicted suicidal ideation in the GENDEP pharmacogenetics study and also predicted SA in a combined validation dataset. Polygenic scores for SA showed no predictive ability for suicidal ideation. Polygenic score analysis suggests pleiotropy between psychiatric disorders and suicidal ideation whereas the tendency to act on such thoughts may have a partially independent genetic diathesis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 07/2014; 165(5). DOI:10.1002/ajmg.b.32247 · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar disorder is a severe disorder of mood with a lifetime prevalence of about 1%. The disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression and shows a high heritability of about 70%. Molecular genetic candidate and lately genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a number of susceptibility genes contributing to the etiology of bipolar disorder. However, the disease relevant pathways and regulatory networks are still largely unknown. microRNAs are a class of 21-25-nucleotide small non-coding RNAs. They control the expression of their target genes by binding to target sites in messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Each microRNA usually controls up to several hundred target mRNAs, while one mRNA target can be synergistically regulated by multiple microRNAs. This allows microRNAs to integrate different intracellular signals and to regulate various signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs contribute to the basic mechanisms underlying brain development and synaptic plasticity. This in turn suggests their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of various psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate whether common variants at all known microRNA loci listed in the miRBase database (release 13.0) contribute to the development of bipolar dis¬order. For this purpose we performed gene-based analyses for all microRNAs and +/- 20kb flanking sequences using VEGAS on the largest existing GWAS dataset of bipolar disorder comprising of 9,747 patients and 14,278 controls (Mühleisen et al., 2013). In this dataset we combined our data obtained from four European countries, Canada, and Australia with the results of the large bipolar disorder GWAS by the multinational Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (Sklar et al., 2011). Our analysis revealed that 98 of the 609 microRNAs showed nominally significant p values. The observed number of microRNAs with a p value of < 0.05 was significantly higher than expected (i.e. n=30, p=0.006), indicating that bipolar disorder-associated microRNAs are enriched within the known microRNA loci. After correction for multiple testing, nine microRNAs showed a significant association with bipolar disorder (let-7g, miR-135a, miR-499, miR-581, miR-611, miR-640, miR-644, miR-708, miR-1908). These included microRNAs known to be involved in neural development, neuronal differentiation and synaptic plasticity. The investigation of the affected target genes and the underlying regulatory networks is currently underway and will be presented. Preliminary data provide evidence for an involvement of at least two microRNA-regulated networks in the development of bipolar disorder.
    Medizinische Genetik 03/2014; 26(1):94-95. · 0.09 Impact Factor
  • Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes 03/2014; 122(03). DOI:10.1055/s-0034-1372321 · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the leading causes of global disability. It is a risk factor for noncompliance with medical treatment, with about 40% of patients not responding to currently used antidepressant drugs. The identification and clinical implementation of biomarkers that can indicate the likelihood of treatment response are needed in order to predict which patients will benefit from an antidepressant drug. While analyzing the blood plasma proteome collected from MDD patients before the initiation of antidepressant medication, we observed different fibrinogen alpha (FGA) levels between drug responders and nonresponders. These results were replicated in a second set of patients. Our findings lend further support to a recently identified association between MDD and fibrinogen levels from a large-scale study.
    01/2014; 4:e352. DOI:10.1038/tp.2013.129
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common and highly heritable mental illness and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have robustly identified the first common genetic variants involved in disease aetiology. The data also provide strong evidence for the presence of multiple additional risk loci, each contributing a relatively small effect to BD susceptibility. Large samples are necessary to detect these risk loci. Here we present results from the largest BD GWAS to date by investigating 2.3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of 24,025 patients and controls. We detect 56 genome-wide significant SNPs in five chromosomal regions including previously reported risk loci ANK3, ODZ4 and TRANK1, as well as the risk locus ADCY2 (5p15.31) and a region between MIR2113 and POU3F2 (6q16.1). ADCY2 is a key enzyme in cAMP signalling and our finding provides new insights into the biological mechanisms involved in the development of BD.
    Nature Communications 01/2014; 5:3339. DOI:10.1038/ncomms4339 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Highly recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) has reportedly increased risk of shifting to bipolar disorder; high recurrence frequency has, therefore, featured as evidence of 'soft bipolarity'. We aimed to investigate the genetic underpinnings of total depressive episode count in recurrent MDD. Our primary sample included 1966 MDD cases with negative family history of bipolar disorder from the RADIANT studies. Total episode count was adjusted for gender, age, MDD duration, study and center before being tested for association with genotype in two separate genome-wide analyses (GWAS), in the full set and in a subset of 1364 cases with positive family history of MDD (FH+). We also calculated polygenic scores from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium MDD and bipolar disorder studies. Episodicity (especially intermediate episode counts) was an independent index of MDD familial aggregation, replicating previous reports. The GWAS produced no genome-wide significant findings. The strongest signals were detected in the full set at MAGI1 (p=5.1×10(-7)), previously associated with bipolar disorder, and in the FH+ subset at STIM1 (p=3.9×10(-6) after imputation), a calcium channel signaling gene. However, these findings failed to replicate in an independent Munich cohort. In the full set polygenic profile analyses, MDD polygenes predicted episodicity better than bipolar polygenes; however, in the FH+ subset, both polygenic scores performed similarly. Episode count was self-reported and, therefore, subject to recall bias. Our findings lend preliminary support to the hypothesis that highly recurrent MDD with FH+ is part of a 'soft bipolar spectrum' but await replication in larger cohorts.
    Journal of Affective Disorders 10/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.jad.2013.10.027 · 3.76 Impact Factor
  • Pharmacopsychiatry 09/2013; 46(06). DOI:10.1055/s-0033-1353352 · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17–29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn’s disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders.
    Nature Genetics 08/2013; AOP. DOI:10.1038/ng.2711 · 29.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dysfunctional limbic, paralimbic and prefrontal brain circuits represent neural substrates of major depression that are targeted by pharmacotherapy. In a high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study we investigated the potential of variability of the cortex volume to predict the response to antidepressant treatment among patients with major depression. We enrolled 167 patients participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) study and employed voxel based morphometry to investigate covariation of gray matter (GM) maps with changes of depression severity over 5 weeks. Larger left hippocampal and bilateral posterior cingulate GM volumes and lower right temporolateral GM volumes were associated with beneficial treatment response. Subcallosal/orbitofrontal GM volumes were associated with treatment response mainly through gender-by-region interactions. A hippocampal/temporolateral composite marker proved robust in both first episode and recurrent unipolar patients and in bipolar patients. Compared with 92 healthy controls, abnormally low volumes were only detected in the left hippocampal area, particularly in recurrent unipolar patients. These findings indicate that variability of the cortex volume of specific brain areas is associated with different response to antidepressants. In addition, hippocampal findings recursively link together unfavorable treatment response and progressive hippocampal structural changes in recurrent depression.
    European neuropsychopharmacology: the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology 08/2013; 23(11). DOI:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2013.07.004 · 3.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The gene product of the ABCB1 gene, the P-glycoprotein, functions as a custodian molecule in the blood-brain barrier and regulates the access of most antidepressants into the brain. Previous studies showed that ABCB1 polymorphisms predicted the response to antidepressants that are substrates of the P-gp, while the response to nonsubstrates was not influenced by ABCB1 polymorphisms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical application of ABCB1 genotyping in antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Data came from 58 depressed inpatients participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project, whose ABCB1 gene test results were implemented into the clinical decision making process. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) scores, remission rates, and duration of hospital stay were documented with dose and kind of antidepressant treatment. Patients who received ABCB1 genotyping had higher remission rates [χ2(1) = 6.596, p = 0.005, 1-sided] and lower Hamilton sores [t(111) = 2.091, p = 0.0195, 1-sided] at the time of discharge from hospital as compared to patients without ABCB1 testing. Among major allele homozygotes for ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2032583 and rs2235015 (TT/GG genotype), an increase in dose was associated with a shorter duration of hospital stay [rho(28) = -0.441, p = 0.009, 1-sided], whereas other treatment strategies (eg, switching to a nonsubstrate) showed no significant associations with better treatment outcome. Discussion The implementation of ABCB1 genotyping as a diagnostic tool influenced clinical decisions and led to an improvement of treatment outcome. Patients carrying the TT/GG genotype seemed to benefit from an increase in P-gp substrate dose. Results suggest that antidepressant treatment of depression can be optimized by the clinical application of ABCB1 genotyping.
    CNS spectrums 07/2013; DOI:10.1017/S1092852913000436 · 1.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SLC6A15 is a neuron-specific neutral amino acid transporter that belongs to the solute carrier 6 gene family. This gene family is responsible for presynaptic re-uptake of the majority of neurotransmitters. Convergent data from human studies, animal models and pharmacological investigations suggest a possible role of SLC6A15 in major depressive disorder. In this work, we explored potential functional variants in this gene that could influence the activity of the amino acid transporter and thus downstream neuronal function and possibly the risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DNA from 400 depressed patients and 400 controls was screened for genetic variants using a pooled targeted re-sequencing approach. Results were verified by individual re-genotyping and validated non-synonymous coding variants were tested in an independent sample (N = 1934). Nine variants altering the amino acid sequence were then assessed for their functional effects by measuring SLC6A15 transporter activity in a cellular uptake assay. In total, we identified 405 genetic variants, including twelve non-synonymous variants. While none of the non-synonymous coding variants showed significant differences in case-control associations, two rare non-synonymous variants were associated with a significantly increased maximal (3)H proline uptake as compared to the wildtype sequence. Our data suggest that genetic variants in the SLC6A15 locus change the activity of the amino acid transporter and might thus influence its neuronal function and the risk for stress-related psychiatric disorders. As statistically significant association for rare variants might only be achieved in extremely large samples (N >70,000) functional exploration may shed light on putatively disease-relevant variants.
    PLoS ONE 07/2013; 8(7):e68645. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0068645 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data from clinical studies and results from animal models suggest an involvement of the neurotrophin system in the pathology of depression and antidepressant treatment response. Genetic variations within the genes coding for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its key receptor Trkb (NTRK2) may therefore influence the response to antidepressant treatment. We performed a single and multi-marker association study with antidepressant treatment outcome in 398 depressed Caucasian inpatients participating in the Munich Antidepressant Response Signature (MARS) project. Two Caucasian replication samples (N = 249 and N = 247) were investigated, resulting in a total number of 894 patients. 18 tagging SNPs in the BDNF gene region and 64 tagging SNPs in the NTRK2 gene region were genotyped in the discovery sample; 16 nominally associated SNPs were tested in two replication samples. In the discovery analysis, 7 BDNF SNPs and 9 NTRK2 SNPs were nominally associated with treatment response. Three NTRK2 SNPs (rs10868223, rs1659412 and rs11140778) also showed associations in at least one replication sample and in the combined sample with the same direction of effects (Pcorr = .018, Pcorr = .015 and Pcorr = .004, respectively). We observed an across-gene BDNF-NTRK2 SNP interaction for rs4923468 and rs1387926. No robust interaction of associated SNPs was found in an analysis of BDNF serum protein levels as a predictor for treatment outcome in a subset of 93 patients. CONCLUSIONSLIMITATIONS: Although not all associations in the discovery analysis could be unambiguously replicated, the findings of the present study identified single nucleotide variations in the BDNF and NTRK2 genes that might be involved in antidepressant treatment outcome and that have not been previously reported in this context. These new variants need further validation in future association studies.
    PLoS ONE 06/2013; 8(6):e64947. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0064947 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: Recent evidence suggests that certain antidepressants are associated with an increase of periodic leg movements (PLMS) that may disturb sleep. So far, this has been shown in patients clinically treated for depression and in cross-sectional studies for various substances, but not mirtazapine. It is unclear whether antidepressants induce the new onset of PLMS or only increase preexisting PLMS, and whether this is a general property of the antidepressant or only seen in depressed patients. We report here the effect of mirtazapine on PLMS in young healthy men. Design: Open-labeled clinical trial (NCT00878540) including a 3-week preparatory phase with standardized food, physical activity, and sleep-wake behavior, and a 10-day experimental inpatient phase with an adaptation day, 2 baseline days, and 7 days with mirtazapine. Setting: Research institute. Participants: Twelve healthy young (20-25 years) men. Interventions: Seven days of nightly intake (22:00) of 30 mg mirtazapine. Measurements and results: Sleep was recorded on 2 drug-free baseline nights, the first 2 drug nights, and the last 2 drug nights. Eight of the 12 subjects showed increased PLMS after the first dose of mirtazapine. Frequency of PLMS was highest on the first drug night and attenuated over the course of the next 6 days. Three subjects reported transient restless legs symptoms. Conclusions: Mirtazapine provoked PLMS in 67% of young healthy males. The effect was most pronounced in the first days. The possible role of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic mechanisms in mirtazapine-induced PLMS is discussed.
    Sleep 05/2013; 36(05):661-669. DOI:10.5665/sleep.2622 · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The FK506 binding protein 51 or FKBP5 has been implicated in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) sensitivity, and genetic variants in this gene have been associated with mood and anxiety disorders. GR resistance and associated stress hormone dysregulation are among the most robust biological findings in major depression, the extent of which may be moderated by FKBP5 polymorphisms. FKBP5 mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells (baseline and following in vivo GR stimulation with 1.5 mg dexamethasone p.o.) was analyzed together with plasma cortisol, ACTH, dexamethasone levels and the FKBP5 polymorphism rs1360780 in 68 depressed patients and 87 healthy controls. We observed a significant (P = 0.02) interaction between disease status and FKBP5 risk allele carrier status (minor allele T) on GR-stimulated FKBP5 mRNA expression. Patients carrying the risk T allele, but not the CC genotype, showed a reduced induction of FKBP5 mRNA. This FKBP5 polymorphism by disease status interaction was paralleled by the extent of plasma cortisol and ACTH suppression following dexamethasone administration, with a reduced suppression only observed in depressed patients carrying the T allele. Only depressed patients carrying the FKBP5 rs1360780 risk allele showed significant GR resistance compared with healthy controls, as measured by dexamethasone-induced FKBP5 mRNA induction in peripheral blood cells and suppression of plasma cortisol and ACTH concentrations. This finding suggests that endocrine alterations in depressed patients are determined by genetic variants and may allow identification of specific subgroups.
    Genes Brain and Behavior 02/2013; 12(3). DOI:10.1111/gbb.12026 · 3.60 Impact Factor