Ingo B Autenrieth

Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung DZIF, Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany

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Publications (185)842.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Intimin and Invasin are prototypical inverse (Type Ve) autotransporters and important virulence factors of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Yersinia spp., respectively. In addition to a C-terminal extracellular domain and a β-barrel transmembrane domain, both proteins also contain a short N-terminal periplasmic domain that, in Intimin, includes a lysin motif (LysM), which is thought to mediate binding to peptidoglycan. We show that the periplasmic domain of Intimin does bind to peptidoglycan both in vitro and in vivo, but only under acidic conditions. We were able to determine a dissociation constant of 0.8 μM for this interaction, whereas the Invasin periplasmic domain, which lacks a LysM, bound only weakly in vitro and failed to bind peptidoglycan in vivo. We present the solution structure of the Intimin LysM, which has an additional α-helix conserved within inverse autotransporter LysMs but lacking in others. In contrast to previous reports, we demonstrate that the periplasmic domain of Intimin mediates dimerisation. We further show that dimerisation and peptidoglycan binding are general features of LysM-containing inverse autotransporters. Peptidoglycan binding by the periplasmic domain in the infection process may aid in resisting mechanical and chemical stress during transit through the gastrointestinal tract.
    Molecular Microbiology 10/2014; · 5.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) belongs to a class of bacterial adhesins that form trimeric structures. Their mature form contains a passenger domain and a C-terminal β-domain that anchors the protein in the outer membrane (OM). Little is known about how precursors of such proteins cross the periplasm and assemble into the OM. In the present study we took advantage of the evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins between bacteria and mitochondria. We previously observed that upon expression in yeast cells, bacterial β-barrel proteins including the transmembrane domain of YadA assemble into the mitochondrial OM. In the current study we found that when expressed in yeast cells both the monomeric and trimeric forms of full-length YadA were detected in mitochondria but only the trimeric species was fully integrated into the OM. The oligomeric form was exposed on the surface of the organelle in its native conformation and maintained its capacity to adhere to host cells. The co-expression of YadA with a mitochondria-targeted form of the bacterial periplasmic chaperone Skp, but not with SurA or SecB, resulted in enhanced levels of both forms of YadA. Taken together, these results indicate that the proper assembly of trimeric autotransporter can occur also in a system lacking the lipoproteins of the BAM machinery and is specifically enhanced by the chaperone Skp.
    The Journal of biological chemistry. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. NOD2 is an intracellular PRR that senses bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) structures, e.g. muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Here we focused on the effect of higher-cross-linked, polymeric PGN fragments (PGNpol) in the activation of the innate immune system. In this study, the effect of a combined NOD2 and TLR2 stimulation was examined compared to a single stimulation of the NOD2 receptor alone.
    Infection and immunity 08/2014; 82(11):4681-4688. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in Enterobacteriaceae are an increasing problem worldwide. This report describes the isolation of Citrobacter freundii carrying IMP-8 MBL from three patients during the period from March 2012 until March 2013 in Germany. The blaIMP-8 enzyme is predominantly found in Asia, where IMP-8 has spread to various enterobacterial species causing serious infections. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of blaIMP-8 habouring Enterobacteriaceae in Europe.
    New Microbes and New Infections. 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a growing issue across the globe. Fast and reliable diagnostic tools are needed for appropriate implementation of infection control measures. In this study we evaluated the performance of three commercial combined disk tests, two EDTA based in-house combined disk tests and the Carba NP test in comparison to molecular detection of MBL genes on 133 meropenem non-susceptible non-duplicate P. aeruginosa clinical isolates. The meropenem/DPA based commercial KPC + MBL-confirm ID kit (Rosco Diagnostica, Denmark) and the MASTDISCS™ ID carbapenemase (Enterobacteriaceae) detection disc set (MAST Diagnostics, UK) showed sensitivities of 31.1 % and 28.8 % and specificities of 69.3 % and 79.6 %, respectively. The total MBL confirm kit (Rosco Diagnostica, Denmark) contains imipenem/DPA and imipenem/EDTA combination disks. Evaluation of the single disk combinations revealed 84.4 % sensitivity and 81.8 % specificity for the imipenem/DPA assay and 86.7 % sensitivity and 51.1 % specificity for the imipenem/EDTA test. Applying both tests simultaneously resulted in a slightly higher sensitivity of 88.9 % but a lower specificity of 48.9 % when compared to the single tests alone. The Carba NP test showed 93.3 % sensitivity and 96.6 % specificity. All phenotypic combined disk tests lacked either sensitivity or specificity for the detection of MBL in P. aeruginosa. The Carba NP test showed excellent test properties, but suffers from drawbacks in handling and high costs. The optimal diagnostic approach needs to be chosen depending on the epidemiological situation, laboratory resources and availability of molecular confirmation tests.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 01/2014; · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Severe pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been shown to be more sensitive than current standard microbiological methods - particularly in patients with prior antibiotic treatment - and therefore, may improve the accuracy of microbiological diagnosis for hospitalized patients with pneumonia. Conventional detection techniques and multiplex PCR for 14 typical bacterial pneumonia-associated pathogens were performed on respiratory samples collected from adult hospitalized patients enrolled in a prospective multi-center study. Patients were enrolled from March until September 2012. A total of 739 fresh, native samples were eligible for analysis, of which 75 were sputa, 421 aspirates, and 234 bronchial lavages. 276 pathogens were detected by microbiology for which a valid PCR result was generated (positive or negative detection result by Curetis prototype system). Among these, 120 were identified by the prototype assay, 50 pathogens were not detected. Overall performance of the prototype for pathogen identification was 70.6% sensitivity (95% confidence interval (CI) lower bound: 63.3%, upper bound: 76.9%) and 95.2% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 94.6%, upper bound: 95.7%). Based on the study results, device cut-off settings were adjusted for future series production. The overall performance with the settings of the CE series production devices was 78.7% sensitivity (95% CI lower bound: 72.1%) and 96.6% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 96.1%). Time to result was 5.2 hours (median) for the prototype test and 43.5 h for standard-of-care. The Pneumonia Application provides a rapid and moderately sensitive assay for the detection of pneumonia-causing pathogens with minimal hands-on time.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(11):e110566. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and especially multidrug-resistant TB (MDR) continues to increase alarmingly worldwide, and reliable and fast diagnosis of MDR is essential for the adequate treatment of patients. In contrast to the standard culture methods, nucleid acid amplification tests (NAATs) provide information about presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) DNA and a potential resistance pattern within hours. We analyzed specimens of 110 patients from Nigeria comparing culture-based drug susceptibility testing (DST) to NAAT assays detecting isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP) (GenoType MTBDRplus), and ethambutol (EMB) (GenoType MTBDRsl) resistance. Compared to DST, the GenoType MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl showed a specificity of 100% (86.3-100) and a sensitivity of 86% (42.1-99.6%) for detection of INH and a specificity of 100% (86.3-100) and a sensitivity of 83% (35.9-99.6%) for detection of RMP, and a sensitivity 100% (47.8-100%) for EMB resistance. However, in two strains, the NAAT assays provided false susceptible results as the mutations causing resistance were in genomic regions not covered by the probes of the GenoType MTBDRplus assay. We show that, in combination to DST, application of the GenoType MTBDRplus and GenoType MTBDRsl assays might be a useful additional tool to allow a rapid and safe diagnosis of MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) MTBC.
    European journal of microbiology & immunology. 12/2013; 3(4):252-257.
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    ABSTRACT: The intestinal microbiota is an important determinant of the mucosal response. In patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), the mucosal immune system has inappropriate interactions with the intestinal microbiota. We investigated how the composition of the intestinal microbiota affects its endotoxicity and development of colitis in mice. Germ-free C57BL/6J-Rag(1tm1Mom) (Rag1-/-) mice were colonized with 2 different types of complex intestinal microbiota. Colitis was induced in Rag1-/- mice by transfer of CD4(+)CD62L(+) T cells from C57BL/6J mice. Colonic tissues were collected and used for histologic analysis and cell isolation. Activation of lamina propria dendritic cells and T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Following transfer of CD4(+)CD62L(+) T cells, mice with intestinal Endo(lo) microbiota (a low proportion of Enterobacteriaceae, high proportion of Bacteroidetes, and low endotoxicity) maintained mucosal immune homoeostasis, whereas mice with highly endotoxic, Endo(hi) microbiota (a high proportion of Enterobacteriaceae and low proportion of Bacteroidetes) developed colitis. To determine whether the effects of Endo(hi) microbiota were related to the higher endotoxic activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we compared LPS from Enterobacteriaceae with that of Bacteroidetes. Administration of Escherichia coli JM83 (wild-type LPS) to the mice exacerbated colitis, whereas E coli JM83+htrBPG (mutated LPS, with lower endotoxicity, similar to that of Bacteroidetes) prevented development of colitis following transfer of the T cells to mice. The endotoxicity of LPS produced by the intestinal microbiota is a determinant of whether mice develop colitis following transfer of CD4(+)CD62L(+) T cells. This finding might aid the design of novel biologics or probiotics to treat IBD.
    Gastroenterology 11/2013; · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Migration of dendritic cells (DCs) plays an important role in T-cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sensed by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) serves as a signal for DC migration. We analyzed LPS-induced DC volume changes preceding the directed movement towards chemoattractants. Treatment with LPS resulted in rapid, prolonged cell swelling in wild-type (WT), but not in TLR4(-/-) bone marrow-derived (BM) DCs indicating that TLR4 signaling is essential for LPS-induced swelling. As a consequence, LPS-treatment enhanced the migratory activity along a chemokine (CCL21)-gradient in WT, but not in TLR4-deficient BMDCs suggesting that the LPS/TLR4-induced swelling response facilitates DC migration. Moreover, the role of calcium-activated potassium channels (KCa 3.1) as putative regulators of immune cell volume regulation and migration was analyzed in LPS-challenged BMDCs. We found that the LPS-induced swelling of KCa 3.1-deficient DCs was impaired when compared to WT DCs. Accordingly, the LPS-induced increase in [Ca(2+) ]i detected in WT DCs was reduced in KCa 3.1-deficient DCs. Finally, directed migration of LPS-challenged KCa 3.1-deficient DCs was low compared to WT DCs indicating that activation of KCa 3.1 is involved in LPS-induced DC migration. These findings suggest that both TLR4 and KCa 3.1 contribute to the migration of LPS-activated DCs as an important feature of the adaptive immune response.
    Microbiology and Immunology 11/2013; · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blood stream infections (BSI) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lead to poor clinical outcomes. The worldwide emergence and spread of metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing, often multidrug-resistant organisms may further aggravate this problem. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa (MBL-PA) and various other resistance phenotypes on clinical outcomes. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in three German hospitals. Medical files from 2006 until 2012 were studied, and a number of 113 patients with P. aeruginosa BSI were included. The presence of VIM, IMP and NDM genes was detected using molecular techniques. Genetic relatedness was assessed through multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The effect of resistance patterns or MBL production on clinical outcomes was investigated by using multivariate Cox regression models. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with MBL-PA and multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. However, neither BSI with MBL-PA nor BSI with various resistance phenotypes of P. aeruginosa were independently associated with mortality or length of hospital stay. In multivariate models, the SAPS II score (HR 1.046), appropriate definitive treatment (HR range 0.25-0.26), and cardiovascular disease (HR range 0.44-0.46) were independent predictors of mortality. Concomitant infections were associated with an excess length of stay (HR < 1). Medication with appropriate antimicrobial agents at any time during the course of infection remains the key for improving clinical outcomes in patients with P. aeruginosa BSI and should be combined with a strict implementation of routine infection control measures.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 11/2013; 13(1):515. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Type I IFN signaling amplifies the secretion of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α or IL-6 and might thus contribute to the high mortality associated with Gram-negative septic shock in humans. The underlying molecular mechanism, however, is ill defined. In this study, we report the generation of mice deficient in IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (Ifit2) and demonstrate that Ifit2 is a critical signaling intermediate for LPS-induced septic shock. Ifit2 expression was significantly upregulated in response to LPS challenge in an IFN-α receptor- and IFN regulatory factor (Irf)9-dependent manner. Also, LPS induced secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α by bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) was significantly enhanced in the presence of Ifit2. In accordance, Ifit2-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and reduced mortality in an endotoxin shock model. Investigation of the underlying signal transduction events revealed that Ifit2 upregulates Irf3 phosphorylation. In the absence of Irf3, reduced Ifn-β mRNA expression and Ifit2 protein expression after LPS stimulation was found. Also, Tnf-α and Il-6 secretion but not Tnf-α and Il-6 mRNA expression levels were reduced. Thus, IFN-stimulated Ifit2 via enhanced Irf3 phosphorylation upregulates the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. It thereby amplifies LPS-induced cytokine production and critically influences the outcome of endotoxin shock.
    The Journal of Immunology 09/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The time to positivity (TTP), measured as the time span between the start of incubation and the alert signal from the blood culture device, has been described as useful tool of prognosis in patients suffering from blood stream infection with Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. The present study investigates the relationship between TTP and in-hospital mortality in patients with monomicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa blood stream infection (PA-BSI). From 2006 until 2012 a retrospective cohort study was undertaken in 3 hospitals in the region surrounding Tübingen, Germany. Seventy-four patients with monomicrobial PA-BSI were studied. TTP and clinical parameters were determined and analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Cox regression. The in-hospital mortality of our clinical cohort was 33.78%. In multivariate Cox regression, a TTP ≤ 18 hours proved to be independently associated with mortality (HR 3.83, P = 0.012) along with SAPS II score (HR 1.04, P = 0.006), cardiac disease (HR 0.33, P = 0.008) and appropriate definitive antimicrobial treatment (HR 0.21, P = 0.013). TTP is an easy-to-measure laboratory tool for prognosis in patients with monomicrobial PA-BSI, providing useful information in addition to clinical parameters.
    The Journal of infection 06/2013; · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association between antimicrobial consumption and resistance in non-fermentative gram-negative bacteria is well known. Antimicrobial restriction, implemented in clinical routine by antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs), is considered as a mean to reduce resistance rates. Whether and how antimicrobial restriction can accomplish this goal is still unknown though. This leads to an element of uncertainty when designing strategies for ASPs. From January 2002 until December 2011 an observational study was performed at the University Hospital Tübingen, Germany to investigate the association between antimicrobial use and resistance rates in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transfer function models were used to determine such associations and to simulate antimicrobial restriction strategies. Various positive associations between antimicrobial consumption and resistance were observed in our setting. Surprisingly, impact estimations of different antimicrobial restrictions strategies revealed relatively low intervention expenses to effectively attenuate the observed increase in resistance. For example, a simulated intervention of an annual 4% reduction in the use of meropenem over 3 years from 2009 until 2011 yielded a 62.5% attenuation (95% confidence interval: 15% - 110%) in the rising trend of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (34MRGN-PA). Time series analysis models derived from past data may be a tool to predict the outcome of antimicrobial restriction strategies, and could be used to design ASPs.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 02/2013; · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In industrialized countries bacterial intestinal infections are commonly caused by enteropathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The interaction of the microbiota with the host immune system determines the adequacy of an appropriate response against pathogens. In this study we addressed whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium adolescentis is protective during intestinal Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed with B. adolescentis, infected with Yersinia enterocolitica, or B. adolescentis fed and subsequently infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. B. adolescentis fed and Yersinia infected mice were protected from Yersinia infection as indicated by a significantly reduced weight loss and splenic Yersinia load when compared to Yersinia infected mice. Moreover, protection from infection was associated with increased intestinal plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell function was investigated using depletion experiments by injecting B. adolescentis fed, Yersinia infected C57BL/6 mice with anti-mouse PDCA-1 antibody, to deplete plasmacytoid dendritic cells, or respective isotype control. The B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia dissemination to the spleen was abrogated after plasmacytoid dendritic cell depletion indicating a crucial function for pDC in control of intestinal Yersinia infection. We suggest that feeding of B. adolescentis modulates the intestinal immune system in terms of increased plasmacytoid dendritic cell and regulatory T-cell frequencies, which might account for the B. adolescentis-mediated protection from Yersinia enterocolitica infection.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(8):e71338. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Invasin and intimin are major virulence factors of enteropathogenic Yersiniae and Escherichia coli, mediating invasion into and intimate adherence to host cells, respectively. Several studies have hinted that extracellular portion of these homologous proteins might be exported via an autotransport mechanism, but rigorous experimental proof has been lacking. Here, we present a topology model for invasin and intimin, consistent with the hypothesis that the N-terminal β-barrel domain acts as a translocation pore to secrete the C-terminal passenger domain. We confirmed this topology model by inserting epitope tags into the loops of the β-barrel. We further show that obstructing the pore of β-barrel hinders the export of the passenger domain. As for classical autotransport, the biogenesis of invasin and intimin is dependent on the Bam complex and the periplasmic chaperone SurA, whereas the chaperone/protease DegP is involved in quality control. However, compared to classical autotransporters (Type Va secretion), the domain structure of intimin and invasin is inverted. We conclude that proteins of the intimin and invasin family constitute a novel group of autotransported proteins, and propose that this class of autotransporters be termed Type Ve secretion.
    PLoS ONE 11/2012; 7(10):e47069. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yersinia adhesin A (YadA) is a major virulence factor of Yersinia enterocolitica. YadA mediates host cell binding and autoaggregation and protects the pathogen from killing by the complement system. Previous studies demonstrated that YadA is the most important single factor mediating serum resistance of Y. enterocolitica, presumably by binding C4b binding protein (C4BP) and factor H, which are both complement inhibitors. Factor H acts as a cofactor for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b into the inactive form iC3b and thus prevents formation of inflammatory effector compounds and the terminal complement complex. In this study, we challenged the current direct binding model of factor H to YadA and show that Y. enterocolitica YadA recruits C3b and iC3b directly, without the need of an active complement cascade or additional serum factors. Enhanced binding of C3b does not decrease survival of YadA-expressing Yersiniae because C3b becomes readily inactivated by factor H and factor I. Binding of factor H to YadA is greatly reduced in the absence of C3. Experiments using Yersinia lacking YadA or expressing YadA with reduced trimeric stability clearly demonstrate that both the presence and full trimeric stability of YadA are essential for complement resistance. A novel mechanism of factor H binding is presented in which YadA exploits recruitment of C3b or iC3b to attract large amounts of factor H. As a consequence, formation of the terminal complement complex is limited and bacterial survival is enhanced. These findings add a new aspect of how Y. enterocolitica effectively evades the host complement system.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2012; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: "Quorum sensing" (QS) is the phenomenon which allows single bacterial cells to measure the concentration of bacterial signal molecules. Two principle different QS systems are known, the Autoinducer 1 system (AI-1) for the intraspecies communication using different Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) and AI-2 for the interspecies communication. Aim of this study was to investigate QS of Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (Mutaflor). While E. coli Nissle is producing AI-2 in a density dependent manner, no AI-1 was produced. To study the effect of AI-2 in the DSS (dextran sulphate sodium) induced mouse model of acute colitis, we silenced the corresponding gene luxS by intron insertion. The mutant bacterium E. coli Nissle::luxS was equally effective in colonizing the colon and the mutation turned out to be 100% stable during the course of the experiment. Isolating RNA from the colon mucosa and performing semiquantitative RT PCR, we were able to show that the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-y was suppressed in mice being infected with the E. coli Nissle wild type. Mice infected with the E. coli Nissle::luxS mutant showed a suppressed expression of IL-10 compared to uninfected mice, while the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was higher in these mice. The expression of mBD-1 was suppressed in mice being infected with the mutant in comparison to the mice not infected or infected with the wild type. No differences were seen in the histological examination of the colon sections in the different groups of mice. E. coli Nissle is producing AI-2 molecules, which are influencing the expression of cytokines in the mucosa of the colon in the DSS mice. However, if QS has a direct influence on the probiotic properties of E. coli Nissle remains to be elucidated.
    Gut Pathogens 08/2012; 4(1):8. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing organisms are spreading worldwide in hospital and community settings. A total of 328 unduplicated ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated in 2008 and 2009 at the University Hospital of Tübingen were analysed retrospectively. Escherichia coli (n = 253) and Klebsiella spp. (n = 46) were the most frequent ESBL-producing species. The ESBL rates among E. coli and Klebsiella spp. increased from 3.8 and 2.1%, respectively, in 2008, to 5.2 and 2.4%, respectively, in 2009. Two E. coli and 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL producers were non-susceptible to ertapenem, most likely due to loss of porins. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of selected, molecularly characterized ESBL producers revealed susceptibility to tigecycline among 97.9% (191/195) of the E. coli and 78.8% (26/33) of the K. pneumoniae isolates. PCR analysis and sequencing showed the presence of CTX-M-type enzymes in 91.3% of the E. coli and 87.9% of the K. pneumoniae isolates, whereby bla(CTX-M-15) was the most frequent ESBL gene both in E. coli (50.0%) and K. pneumoniae (51.5%). Only 7 single cases of potential patient-to-patient transmissions of E. coli strains were observed. Our data suggest that the increase in ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates at our hospital is mainly caused by growing import of Enterobacteriaceae harbouring CTX-M-type ESBLs.
    Chemotherapy 07/2012; 58(3):241-8. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DC are among the first antigen presenting cells encountering bacteria at mucosal surfaces, and play an important role in maintenance of regular homeostasis in the intestine. Upon stimulation DC undergo activation and maturation and as initiators of T cell responses they have the capacity to stimulate naive T cells. However stimulation of naive murine DC with B. vulgatus or LPS at low drives DC to a semimature (sm) state with low surface expression of activation-markers and a reduced capacity to activate T-cells. Additionally semimature DC are nonresponsive to subsequent TLR stimulation in terms of maturation, TNF-alfa but not IL-6 production. Ligation of CD40 is an important mechanism in enhancing DC maturation, function and capacity to activate T-cells. We investigated whether the DC semimaturation can be overcome by CD40 ligation. Upon CD40 ligation smDC secreted IL-12p40 but not the bioactive heterodimer IL-12p70, additionally CD40 ligation of smDC resulted in increased levels of IL-6 but not an increase expression of CD40. Analysis of the phosphorylation pattern of MAP kinases showed, that in smDC the CD40 ligation induced p38 phosphorylation is inhibited, in contrast phosphorylation of ERK upon CD40 ligation was independent of the DC maturation state. Our data show that the semimature differentiation state of DC can not be overcome by CD40 ligation. We suggest that the inability of CD40 ligation in overcoming DC semimaturation might contribute to the tolerogenic phenotype of semimature DC and at least partially account for maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis.
    BMC Immunology 04/2012; 13(1):22. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • Julia-Stefanie Frick, Ingo B Autenrieth
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    ABSTRACT: The intestinal microbiota is a complex community of microorganisms that colonizes the gastrointestinal tract. The composition of the intestinal microbiota and the number of microorganisms differ in dependency of the local environmental conditions. The intestinal microbiota has an important impact on the development of the intestinal architecture and function, it influences the development of the gut-associated immune system, and epithelial cell functions. One of the most important functions of the intestinal microbiota is the prevention of bacterial overgrowth and susceptibility to infection with enteropathogenic organisms. Additionally, the intestinale microbiota plays a crucial role in the development of the systemic immunity and has an important influence on the host nutrition and metabolism. However, in genetically predisposed hosts, the intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases and pouchitis. Additionally, recent studies suggest that there might be an inflammation triggering effect of the intestinal microbiota in necrotizing enterocolitis. Here, we give an overview of the intestinal microbiota and its variety of roles in health and disease.
    Current topics in microbiology and immunology 04/2012; · 4.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
842.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung DZIF
      Brunswyck, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 2000–2014
    • University of Tuebingen
      • Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Karolinska Institutet
      Solna, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2012
    • Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
      • Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy
      Jena, Thuringia, Germany
  • 2001–2012
    • Universitätsklinikum Tübingen
      • Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2011
    • Philipps University of Marburg
      Marburg, Hesse, Germany
  • 2010
    • Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute
      Jena, Thuringia, Germany
  • 1992–2010
    • University of Wuerzburg
      • • Institute for Molecular Infection Biology
      • • Institute for Hygiene and Microbiology
      Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2002–2009
    • Technische Universität München
      • • Research Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences
      • • Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Immunologie und Hygiene
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2006–2008
    • Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology
      • Department of Protein Evolution
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2004
    • Technische Universität Dresden
      Dresden, Saxony, Germany
  • 1997–2003
    • Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich
      • Max-von-Pettenkofer Institute for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1999–2000
    • Max von Pettenkofer-Institut
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1998
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      • Institute for Immunology
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1989
    • Universität Ulm
      Ulm, Baden-Württemberg, Germany