A Ahmed Ouameur

Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (15)52.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Taxol (paclitaxel) is an anticancer drug that interacts with microtubule proteins in a manner that catalyzes their formation from tubulin and stabilizes the resulting structures. However, in the human lung tumor cell, the concentration of paclitaxel is highest in the nucleus. Therefore, it was of interest to examine the interaction of taxol with DNA and RNA in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Capillary electrophoresis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopic methods were used to characterize the nature of drug–DNA and drug–RNA interactions and to determine the taxol binding site, the binding constant, the sequence selectivity, the helix stability, and the biopolymer secondary structure in the taxol–polynucleotide complexes in vitro. The FTIR spectroscopic studies were conducted with taxol/polynucleotide (phosphate) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/4, and 1/2 with a final DNA(P) or RNA(P) concentration of 12.5 mmol/L, and capillary electrophoresis was performed after incubation of taxol with polynucleotides at ratios of 1/200 to 1/12 with a final polynucleotide concentration of 1.25 mmol/L. Taxol was shown to bind to DNA and RNA at G–C, A–T, or A–U bases and the backbone PO2 group. Two types of binding were observed for taxol–DNA with K1 = 1.3 × 104 L mol–1 and K2 = 3.5 × 103 L mol–1, whereas taxol–RNA complexes showed one type of binding with K = 1.3 × 104 L mol–1. The taxol–polynucleotide complexation is associated with a partial helix stabilization and no major alterations of B-DNA or A-RNA structure. Key words: DNA, RNA, taxol, binding site, binding constant, conformation, helix stability, electrophoresis, FTIR spectroscopy.
    Canadian Journal of Chemistry 02/2011; 82(6):1112-1118. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.
    RNA 10/2010; 16(10):1968-79. · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cited By (since 1996): 8, Export Date: 16 March 2013, Source: Scopus
    RNA 01/2010; 16(10):1968-1979. · 5.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the interaction between tRNA and three polyamine analogues (1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane.4HCl (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333)) using FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed that polyamine analogues bound tRNA via guanine N7, adenine, uracil O2, and the backbone phosphate (PO2-) groups, while the most reactive sites for biogenic polyamines were guanine N7/O6, adenine N7, uracil O2, and sugar 2'-OH groups as well as the backbone phosphate group. The binding constants of polyamine analogue-tRNA recognition were lower than those of the biogenic polyamine-tRNA complexes, with K333 = 2.8 (+/-0.5) x 10(4), K(BE-333) = 3.7 (+/-0.7) x 10(4), K(BE-3333) = 4.0 (+/-0.9) x 10(4), K(spm) = 8.7 (+/-0.9) x 10(5), K(spd) = 6.1 (+/-0.7) x 10(5), and K(put) = 1.0 (+/-0.3) x 10(5) mol/L. tRNA remained in the A-family conformation; however, it aggregated at high polyamine analogue concentrations.
    Biochemistry and Cell Biology 08/2009; 87(4):621-30. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biogenic polyamines, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, are ubiquitous cellular cations and exert multiple biological functions. Polyamine analogues mimic biogenic polyamines at macromolecular level but are unable to substitute for natural polyamines and maintain cell proliferation, indicating biomedical applications. The mechanistic differences in DNA binding mode between natural and synthetic polyamines have not been explored. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of calf thymus DNA with three polyamine analogues, 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane x 4 HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane x 5 HCl (BE-3333), using FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopy. Polyamine analogues bind with guanine and backbone PO2 group as major targets in DNA, whereas biogenic polyamines bind to major and minor grooves as well as to phosphate groups. Weaker interaction with DNA was observed for analogues with respect to biogenic polyamines, with K(333) = 1.90 (+/-0.5) x 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-333) = 6.4 (+/-1.7) x 10(4) M(-1), K(BE-3333) = 4.7 (+/-1.4) x 10(4) M(-1) compared to K(Spm) = 2.3 (+/-1.1) x 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 1.4 (+/-0.6) x 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.02 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1). A partial B- to A-DNA transition was also provoked by analogues. These data suggest distinct differences in the binding of natural and synthetic polyamines with DNA.
    Biomacromolecules 09/2008; 9(10):2712-8. · 5.37 Impact Factor
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    A Ahmed Ouameur, H Arakawa, H A Tajmir-Riahi
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    ABSTRACT: Vanadate induces DNA strand breaks in cultured human fibroblasts at doses that are relative to the occupational exposure. Oxovanadium compounds also exert preventive effects against chemical carcinogenesis in animals and form complexes with DNA in vivo. This study was designed to examine the interaction of calf-thymus DNA with VO2+ and VO3 ions in aqueous solution at physiological pH, with a constant DNA concentration of 12.5 mmol/L and vanadium-DNA (phosphate) molar ratios (r) of 1:160 to 1:2. Capillary electrophoresis and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy were used to determine the cation binding site, the binding constant, the helix stability, and DNA conformation in the oxovanadium-DNA complexes. Structural analysis showed that VO2+ binds DNA through guanine and adenine N-7 atoms and the backbone PO2 group with apparent binding constants of KG = 8.8 x 10(5) (mol/L)-1 and KA = 3.4 x 10(5) (mol/L)-1. The VO3 shows weaker binding through thymine, adenine, and guanine bases, with K = 1.9 x 10(4) (mol/L)-1 and no interaction with the backbone phosphate group. A partial B-to-A DNA transition occurred upon VO-DNA complexation, while DNA remains in the B-family structure in the VO3 complexes.
    Biochemistry and Cell Biology 11/2006; 84(5):677-83. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Protein physical and chemical properties can be altered by polymer interaction. The presence of several high affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it a possible target for many organic and polymer molecules. This study was designed to examine the interaction of HSA with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polymer binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on protein secondary structure. The spectroscopic results showed that PEG is located along the polypeptide chains through H-bonding interactions with an overall affinity constant of K = 4.12 x 10(5) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed no alterations at low PEG concentration (0.1 mM), whereas at high polymer content (1 mM), a reduction of alpha-helix from 59 (free HSA) to 53% and an increase of beta-turn from 11 (free HSA) to 22% occurred in the PEG-HSA complexes (infrared data). The CDSSTR program (CD data) also showed no major alterations of the protein secondary structure at low PEG concentrations (0.1 and 0.5 mM), while at high polymer content (1 mM), a major reduction of alpha-helix from 69 (free HSA) to 58% and an increase of beta-turn from 7 (free HSA) to 18% was observed.
    Biopolymers 09/2005; 78(5):231-6. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The involvement of the Fe cations in autoxidation in cells and tissues is well documented. DNA is a major target in such reaction, and can chelate Fe cation in many ways. The present study was designed to examine the interaction of calf-thymus DNA with Fe(II) and Fe(III), in aqueous solution at pH 6.5 with cation/DNA (P) (P = phosphate) molar ratios (r) of 1:160 to 1:2. Capillary electrophoresis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopic methods were used to determine the cation binding site, the binding constant, helix stability and DNA conformation in Fe-DNA complexes. Structural analysis showed that at low cation concentration (r = 1/80 and 1/40), Fe(II) binds DNA through guanine N-7 and the backbone PO(2) group with specific binding constants of K(G) = 5.40 x 10(4) M(1) and K(P) = 2.40 x 10(4) M(1). At higher cation content, Fe(II) bindings to adenine N-7 and thymine O-2 are included. The Fe(III) cation shows stronger interaction with DNA bases and the backbone phosphate group. At low cation concentration (r = 1:80), Fe(III) binds mainly to the backbone phosphate group, while at higher metal ion content, cation binding to both guanine N-7 atom and the backbone phosphate group is prevailing with specific binding constants of K(G) = 1.36 x 10(5) M(-1) and K(P) = 5.50 x 10(4) M(-1). At r = 1:10, Fe(II) binding causes a minor helix destabilization, whereas Fe(III) induces DNA condensation. No major DNA conformational changes occurred upon iron complexation and DNA remains in the B-family structure.
    DNA and Cell Biology 07/2005; 24(6):394-401. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • A Ahmed Ouameur, R Marty, H A Tajmir-Riahi
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    ABSTRACT: Porphyrins and their metal derivatives are strong protein binders. Some of these compounds have been used for radiation sensitization therapy of cancer and are targeted to interact with cellular DNA and protein. The presence of several high-affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it possible target for many organic and inorganic molecules. Chlorophyll a and chlorophyllin (a food-grade derivative of chlorophyll), the ubiquitous green plant pigment widely consumed by humans, are potent inhibitors of experimental carcinogenesis and interact with protein and DNA in many ways. This study was designed to examine the interaction of HSA with chlorophyll (Chl) and chlorophyllin (Chln) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the pigment binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of porphyrin complexation on protein secondary structure. Spectroscopic results showed that chlorophyll and chlorophyllin are located along the polypeptide chains with no specific interaction. Stronger protein association was observed for Chl than for Chln, with overall binding constants of K(Chl) = 2.9 x 10(4)M(-1) and K(Chln) = 7.0 x 10(3)M(-1). The protein conformation was altered (infrared data) with reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 41-40% and increase of beta-structure from 22% (free HSA) to 29-35% in the pigment-protein complexes. Using the CDSSTR program (CD data) also showed major reduction of alpha-helix from 66% (free HSA) to 58 and 55% upon complexation with Chl and Chln, respectively.
    Biopolymers 03/2005; 77(3):129-36. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Azidothymidine (AZT) is a widely used inhibitor of type I human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase that act as a DNA chain terminator. Studies have shown primer unblocking and rescue of DNA synthesis AZT-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase on DNA and RNA templates. Our recent study showed AZT bindings to the G-C, A-T base pairs and the backbone phosphate group of DNA duplex resulting in partial DNA conformational changes. This study was designed to examine the interaction of AZT with RNA in aqueous solution at physiological condition, using different drug/RNA (phosphate) molar ratios of 1/800 to 1/2 and constant RNA concentration of 1.25 or 12.5 mM (phosphate). Capillary electrophoresis, FTIR, and UV-visible difference spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine the drug binding sites, binding constants, and the effects of AZT complexation on RNA conformation. Structural analysis showed that AZT binds RNA through G-C and A-U bases with two binding constants of K1=7.3 x 10(5) M(-1) and K2=1.90 x 10(5) M(-1). The drug distributions were 54% with G-C, 36% A-U, and 10% with the backbone phosphate group. RNA remains in A-family structure and drug sugar pucker in the C2'-endo/anti conformation in the AZT-RNA complexes. Molecular modeling studies show hydrogen bondings between RNA and AZT donor groups.
    DNA and Cell Biology 12/2004; 23(11):783-8. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Amin Ahmed Ouameur, Heidar-Ali Tajmir-Riahi
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    ABSTRACT: Biogenic polyamines, such as putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are small organic polycations involved in numerous diverse biological processes. These compounds play an important role in nucleic acid function due to their binding to DNA and RNA. It has been shown that biogenic polyamines cause DNA condensation and aggregation similar to that of inorganic cobalt(III)hexamine cation, which has the ability to induce DNA conformational changes. However, the nature of the polyamine.DNA binding at the molecular level is not clearly established and is the subject of much controversy. In the present study the effects of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, and cobalt(III)hexamine on the solution structure of calf-thymus DNA were investigated using affinity capillary electrophoresis, Fourier transform infrared, and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. At low polycation concentrations, putrescine binds preferentially through the minor and major grooves of double strand DNA, whereas spermine, spermidine, and cobalt(III)hexamine bind to the major groove. At high polycation concentrations, putrescine interaction with the bases is weak, whereas strong base binding occurred for spermidine in the major and minor grooves of DNA duplex. However, major groove binding is preferred by spermine and cobalt(III)hexamine cations. Electrostatic attractions between polycation and the backbone phosphate group were also observed. No major alterations of B-DNA were observed for biogenic polyamines, whereas cobalt(III)hexamine induced a partial B --> A transition. DNA condensation was also observed for cobalt(III)hexamine cation, whereas organic polyamines induced duplex stabilization. The binding constants calculated for biogenic polyamines are K(Spm) = 2.3 x 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 1.4 x 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.02 x 10(5) M(-1). Two binding constants have been found for cobalt(III)hexamine with K(1) = 1.8 x 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 9.2 x 10(4) M(-1). The Hill coefficients indicate a positive cooperativity binding for biogenic polyamines and a negative cooperativity for cobalt(III)hexamine.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 10/2004; 279(40):42041-54. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Porphyrins and their metal derivatives are strong nucleic acids binders. Some of these compounds have been used for radiation sensitization therapy of cancer and are targeted to interact with cellular DNA. Chlorophyll (Chl) binds DNA via guanine N-7 atom (major groove) and the backbone phosphate group (Neault and Tajmir-Riahi. Biophys. J. 76, 2177, 1999), whereas chlorophyllin (Chln) intercalates into A-T and G-C regions (Neault and Tajmir-Riahi. J. Phys. Chem. B. 102, 1610, 1998). This study was designed to examine the interaction of RNA with chlorophyll a and chlorophyllin in aqueous solution at physiological pH with pigment/RNA(phosphate) ratios (r) of 1/80 to 1/2. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible difference spectroscopic methods were used to characterize the nature of pigment-RNA interaction and to establish correlation between spectral changes and the pigment binding mode, binding constant, RNA secondary structure and structural variations of pigment-RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic results showed that Chl and Chln bind RNA through G-C and A-U bases and the backbone phosphate group with overall binding constants of KChl = 1.95 x 10(5) M(-1) and KChln = 1.61 x 10(5) M(-1). The larger K value obtained for Chl-RNA complexes is attributed to the formation of more stable five or six-coordinate Mg cation in the RNA adducts, while the four-coordination Cu(II) in Chln can be more stable than that of the five or six-coordinated copper ion in the Chln-RNA complexes. Aggregation of pigment-RNA complexes occurs at high metalloporphyrin concentrations. No biopolymer secondary structural changes were observed upon pigment interaction and RNA remains in the A-family structure in these pigment complexes.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 09/2004; 22(1):45-50. · 4.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oxidative DNA damage has been reported in fetal tissues by exposure to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). AZT has been used effectively for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and AIDS. It showed in vitro to block the nucleoside-binding site of the viral reverse transcriptase and to inhibit DNA replication by chain termination. It incorporates into both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA and is shown to cause cancer in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to examine the interaction of AZT with DNA in aqueous solution at physiological condition, using different drug/DNA (phosphate) molar ratios (r) of 1/80 to 1/2 and constant DNA concentration of 12.5 mM (phosphate). Capillary electrophoresis, FTIR, and UV-visible difference spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to determine the drug binding sites, the binding constants and the effects of the AZT complexation on DNA conformation. Structural analysis showed that AZT binds to DNA through G-C and A-T base pairs and the backbone PO(2) groups with two binding constants of K(1) = 2.60 x 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.20 x 10(5) M(-1). The drug distributions are 50% with G-C, 15% with A-T and 35% with the backbone phosphate group. AZT-DNA interaction is associated with a partial B- to A-DNA conformational transition.
    DNA and Cell Biology 04/2004; 23(3):135-40. · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The presence of several high affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it a possible target for many organic and inorganic molecules. Organic polyamines are widely distributed in living cells and their biological roles have been associated with their physical and chemical interactions with proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. This study is designed to examine the effects of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, and cobalt [Co(III)]-hexamine cations on the solution structure of HSA using Fourier transform IR, UV-visible, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The spectroscopic results show that polyamine cations are located along the polypeptide chains with no specific interaction. The order of perturbations is associated with the number of positive charges of the polyamine cation: spermine > Co(III)-hexamine > spermidine > putrescine. The overall binding constants are 1.7 x 10(4), 1.1 x 10(4), 5.4 x 10(3), and 3.9 x 10(3)M(-1), respectively. The protein conformation is altered (IR and CD data) with reductions of alpha helices from 60 to 55% for free HSA to 50-40% and with increases of beta structures from 22 to 15% for free HSA to 33-23% in the presence of polyamine cations.
    Biopolymers 03/2004; 73(4):503-9. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thallium (Tl) binds to the major and minor grooves of B-DNA in the solid state (Howerton et al., Biochemistry 40, 10023-10031, 2001). The aim of this study was to examine the binding of Tl(I) cation with calf-thymus DNA in aqueous solution at physiological pH, using constant concentration of DNA (12.5 mM) and various concentrations of metal ions (0.5 to 20 mM). UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopic methods were used to determine the cation binding site, the binding constant and DNA structural variations in aqueous solution. Direct Tl bindings to guanine and thymine were evident by major spectral changes of DNA bases with overall binding constant of K = 1.40 x 10(4) M(-1) and little perturbations of the backbone phosphate group. Both major and minor groove bindings were observed with no alteration of the B-DNA conformation. At low metal concentration (0.5 mM), the number of cations bound were 10 per 1000 nucleotides, while at higher cation concentration (10 mM), this increased to 30 cations per 1000 nucleotides.
    Journal of biomolecular structure & dynamics 03/2003; 20(4):561-5. · 4.99 Impact Factor