Jenifer Coburn

Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, United States

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Publications (38)209.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira, is the most widespread zoonosis and has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide. The adhesion of pathogenic Leptospira to host cells, and to extracellular matrix (ECM) components, is likely to be necessary for the ability of leptospires to penetrate, disseminate and persist in mammalian host tissues. Previous work demonstrated that pathogenic L. interrogans binds to host cells more efficiently than to ECM. Using two independent screening methods, mass spectrometry and protein arrays, members of the cadherin family were identified as potential L. interrogans receptors on mammalian host surfaces. We focused our investigation on vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, which is widely expressed on endothelia and is primarily responsible for endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Monolayers of EA.hy926 and HMEC-1 endothelial cells produce VE-cadherin, bind L. interrogans in vitro, and are disrupted upon incubation with the bacteria, which may reflect the endothelial damage seen in vivo. Dose-dependent and saturable binding of L. interrogans to the purified VE-cadherin receptor was demonstrated and pretreatment of purified receptor or endothelial cells with function-blocking antibody against VE-cadherin significantly inhibited bacterial attachment. The contribution of VE-cadherin to leptospiral adherence to host endothelial cell surfaces is biologically significant because VE-cadherin plays an important role in maintaining the barrier properties of the vasculature. Attachment of L. interrogans to the vasculature via VE-cadherin may result in vascular damage, facilitating the escape of the pathogen from the bloodstream into different tissues during disseminated infection, and may contribute to the hemorrhagic manifestations of leptospirosis. This work is first to describe a mammalian cell surface protein as a receptor for L. interrogans.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 01/2014; 8(1):e2672. · 4.57 Impact Factor
  • Jenifer Coburn, John Leong, George Chaconas
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    ABSTRACT: The Lyme disease spirochetes, Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato), must cause persistent, disseminated infection to be maintained in the natural enzootic cycle. In human Lyme disease, spirochetes spread from the site of a tick bite to colonize multiple tissue sites, causing multisystem clinical manifestations. The Lyme spirochetes produce many adhesive surface proteins that collectively recognize diverse host substrates and cell types and are likely to promote dissemination and chronic infection in a variety of tissues. Recent application of state-of-the-art in vivo imaging technologies is illuminating mechanisms of interaction of B. burgdorferi with the host and the importance of multiple adhesins during mammalian infection.
    Trends in Microbiology 07/2013; · 8.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: P66 is a Borrelia burgdorferi surface protein with β(3) integrin binding and channel forming activities. In this study, the role of P66 in mammalian and tick infection was examined. B. burgdorferiΔp66 strains were not infectious in wild-type, TLR2(-/-) - or MyD88(-/-) -deficient mice. Strains with p66 restored to the chromosome restored near wild-type infectivity, while complementation with p66 on a shuttle vector did not restore infectivity. Δp66 mutants are cleared quickly from the site of inoculation, but analyses of cytokine expression and cellular infiltrates at the site of inoculation did not reveal a specific mechanism of clearance. The defect in these mutants cannot be attributed to nutrient limitation or an inability to adapt to the host environment in vivo as Δp66 bacteria were able to survive as well as wild type in dialysis membrane chambers in the rat peritoneum. Δp66 bacteria were able to survive in ticks through the larva to nymph moult, but were non-infectious in mice when delivered by tick bite. Independent lines of evidence do not support any increased susceptibility of the Δp66 strains to factors in mammalian blood. This study is the first to define a B. burgdorferi adhesin as essential for mammalian, but not tick infection.
    Molecular Microbiology 07/2012; 85(6):1105-1118. · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi, an agent of Lyme disease, establishes persistent infection in immunocompetent animals and humans. Although the infection in humans can be cleared by antibiotic therapy, persistence in reservoir animals is necessary for the maintenance of the bacterium in the natural reservoir host⇔tick vector infectious cycle. B. burgdorferi binds to β(1)- and β(3)-chain integrins, and the P66 outer membrane protein is responsible for at least some of the integrin binding activity of the spirochete. Because integrins are transmembrane, bidirectional signaling molecules, integrin binding may alter the nature of the host response to the bacteria. We used isogenic B. burgdorferi p66(+) and Δp66 strains to analyze the responses of cultured human cells to P66-integrin interaction during infection. Microarray results suggest that the response differs according to the cell type, infection time, and experimental conditions. Clusters of genes in functionally related categories that showed significant changes included proteins involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions, actin dynamics, stress response, and immune responses. Integrin binding by P66 may therefore help B. burgdorferi establish infection by facilitating tissue invasion and modulating the activation of the immune system to other components of the bacteria, e.g., lipoproteins. These results provide insight into how B. burgdorferi is able to establish infection in immunocompetent hosts.
    Infection and immunity 05/2011; 79(8):3249-61. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    Kim Nhang Truong, Jenifer Coburn
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    ABSTRACT: Since the 1980s, the incidence of severe pulmonary hemorrhage caused by Leptospira spp. infection has increased. The mild, non-specific symptoms or the more classical form of severe disease with hepatorenal manifestations, Weil's syndrome, predominate world-wide. However, several regions of the world have seen increases in numbers of patients with pulmonary hemorrhage attributed to leptospirosis. The reasons behind the emergence of this syndrome, which carries a high mortality rate, are not known. Several avenues for future research may shed light on the mechanisms involved in development of pulmonary hemorrhage, and inform targeted therapeutics to improve outcomes. Possibilities to consider include: (1) emergence of new bacterial strains, (2) acquisition of virulence traits by strains in the endemic regions, (3) changes in underlying health of the affected human populations, and (4) increased recognition of the syndrome and better record keeping by the medical and veterinary communities. Determining the causes of emerging clinical manifestations presents challenges and opportunities for potentially life-saving research into the pathogenesis of a number of infectious diseases, including leptospirosis.
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology 01/2011; 1:24.
  • Styliani Antonara, Laura Ristow, Jenifer Coburn
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    ABSTRACT: The Borrelia are widely distributed agents of Lyme disease and Relapsing Fever. All are vector-borne zoonotic pathogens, have segmented genomes, and enigmatic mechanisms of pathogenesis. Adhesion to mammalian and tick substrates is one pathogenic mechanism that has been widely studied. At this point, the primary focus of research in this area has been on Borrelia burgdorferi, one agent of Lyme disease, but many of the adhesins of B. burgdorferi are conserved in other Lyme disease agents, and some are conserved in the Relapsing Fever Borrelia. B. burgdorferi adhesins that mediate attachment to cell-surface molecules may influence the host response to the bacteria, while adhesins that mediate attachment to soluble proteins or extracellular matrix components may cloak the bacterial surface from recognition by the host immune system as well as facilitate colonization of tissues. While targeted mutations in the genes encoding some adhesins have been shown to affect the infectivity and pathogenicity of B. burgdorferi, much work remains to be done to understand the roles of the adhesins in promoting the persistent infection required to maintain the bacteria in reservoir hosts.
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology 01/2011; 715:35-49. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Borrelia burgdorferi surface lipoprotein OspC is a critical virulence factor, but its precise role in the establishment of B. burgdorferi infection remains unclear. To determine whether OspC affects the host response at the site of inoculation of the bacterium, the recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils and the production of cytokines were examined at the site of infection by wild-type, ospC mutant, and complemented mutant B. burgdorferi strains. Of the 21 cytokines tested, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, CXCL1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were found at increased levels at the site of inoculation of B. burgdorferi, and the levels varied with the production of OspC at one or more time points over the 1-week course of infection. The kinetics of expression and the dependence on OspC production by B. burgdorferi varied among the cytokines. The production of KC and MCP-1, and the appearance of monocytic infiltrates, correlated with the presence of the bacteria rather than with OspC specifically. In contrast, VEGF production was not correlated simply to the presence of the bacteria and is influenced by the presence of OspC. In in vitro assays, OspC and B. burgdorferi expressing OspC stimulated the growth of endothelial cells more than did the controls. These data suggest the possibility of a novel role for OspC in the life of B. burgdorferi at the interface of its mammalian and tick hosts.
    Infection and immunity 11/2010; 78(11):4723-33. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    Karen V Evangelista, Jenifer Coburn
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    ABSTRACT: Leptospirosis, the most widespread zoonosis in the world, is an emerging public health problem, particularly in large urban centers of developing countries. Several pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira can cause a wide range of clinical manifestations, from a mild, flu-like illness to a severe disease form characterized by multiorgan system complications leading to death. However, the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Leptospira are largely unknown. This article will address the animal models of acute and chronic leptospire infections, and the recent developments in the genetic manipulation of the bacteria, which facilitate the identification of virulence factors involved in pathogenesis and the assessment of their potential values in the control and prevention of leptospirosis.
    Future Microbiology 09/2010; 5(9):1413-25. · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic infection that primarily affects residents of tropical regions, but causes infections in animals and humans in temperate regions as well. The agents of leptospirosis comprise several members of the genus Leptospira, which also includes non-pathogenic, saprophytic species. Leptospirosis can vary in severity from a mild, non-specific illness to severe disease that includes multi-organ failure and widespread endothelial damage and hemorrhage. To begin to investigate how pathogenic leptospires affect endothelial cells, we compared the responses of two endothelial cell lines to infection by pathogenic versus non-pathogenic leptospires. Microarray analyses suggested that pathogenic L. interrogans and non-pathogenic L. biflexa triggered changes in expression of genes whose products are involved in cellular architecture and interactions with the matrix, but that the changes were in opposite directions, with infection by L. biflexa primarily predicted to increase or maintain cell layer integrity, while L. interrogans lead primarily to changes predicted to disrupt cell layer integrity. Neither bacterial strain caused necrosis or apoptosis of the cells even after prolonged incubation. The pathogenic L. interrogans, however, did result in significant disruption of endothelial cell layers as assessed by microscopy and the ability of the bacteria to cross the cell layers. This disruption of endothelial layer integrity was abrogated by addition of the endothelial protective drug lisinopril at physiologically relevant concentrations. These results suggest that, through adhesion of L. interrogans to endothelial cells, the bacteria may disrupt endothelial barrier function, promoting dissemination of the bacteria and contributing to severe disease manifestations. In addition, supplementing antibiotic therapy with lisinopril or derivatives with endothelial protective activities may decrease the severity of leptospirosis.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 01/2010; 4(12):e918. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi, an agent of Lyme disease, encodes the beta(3)-chain integrin ligand P66. P66 is expressed by B. burgdorferi in the mammal, in laboratory media, and as the bacteria are acquired or transmitted by the tick, but is not expressed by the bacterium in unfed ticks. Attempts to reveal factors influencing expression revealed that P66 was expressed in all in vitro conditions investigated. Candidate regulators identified in a search of the B. burgdorferi genome for homologs to other bacterial transcription factors were cloned and introduced into E. coli carrying a p66 promoter-signal sequence-phoA (alkaline phosphatase, or AP) fusion. Three candidate transcription factors-two that decreased AP activity (Hbb and BB0527), and one that increased AP activity (BBA23)-were identified. BBA23 and BB0527 did not bind to the p66 promoter at physiologically relevant concentrations. In contrast, several promoter fragments, including p66, were bound by Hbb (BB0232), with slightly different affinities. Consistent with results from other laboratories, Hbb appears to recognize multiple DNA sequences. Changes in the expression of p66 and bb0232 in the tick at various points with respect to feeding on mice, along with the results of the reporter experiment in the surrogate host E. coli, are consistent with Hbb/BB0232 being involved in regulating p66 expression.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/2009; 38(2):414-27. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leptospirosis is a global public health problem, primarily in the tropical developing world. The pathogenic mechanisms of the causative agents, several members of the genus Leptospira, have been underinvestigated. The exception to this trend has been the demonstration of the binding of pathogenic leptospires to the extracellular matrix (ECM) and its components. In this work, interactions of Leptospira interrogans bacteria with mammalian cells, rather than the ECM, were examined. The bacteria bound more efficiently to the cells than to the ECM, and a portion of this cell-binding activity was attributable to attachment to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs). Chondroitin sulfate B PGs appeared to be the primary targets of L. interrogans attachment, while heparan sulfate PGs were much less important. Inhibition of GAG/PG-mediated attachment resulted in partial inhibition of bacterial attachment, suggesting that additional receptors for L. interrogans await identification. GAG binding may participate in the pathogenesis of leptospirosis within the host animal. In addition, because GAGs are expressed on the luminal aspects of epithelial cells in the proximal tubules of the kidneys, this activity may play a role in targeting the bacteria to this critical site. Because GAGs are shed in the urine, GAG binding may also be important for transmission to new hosts through the environment.
    Infection and immunity 10/2009; 77(12):5528-36. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, activates multiple signalling pathways leading to induction of pro-inflammatory mediators at sites of inflammation. Binding of B. burgdorferi to integrin alpha(3)beta(1) on human chondrocytes activates signalling leading to release of several pro-inflammatory mediators, but the B. burgdorferi protein that binds integrin alpha(3)beta(1) and elicits this response has remained unknown. A search of the B. burgdorferi genome for a canonical integrin binding motif, the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) tripeptide, revealed several candidate ligands for integrins. In this study we show that one of these candidates, BBB07, binds to integrin alpha(3)beta(1) and inhibits attachment of intact B. burgdorferi to the same integrin. BBB07 is expressed during murine infection as demonstrated by recognition by infected mouse sera. Recombinant purified BBB07 induces pro-inflammatory mediators in primary human chondrocyte cells by interaction with integrin alpha(3)beta(1). This interaction is specific, as P66, another integrin ligand of B. burgdorferi, does not activate signalling through alpha(3)beta(1). In summary, we have identified a B. burgdorferi protein, BBB07, that interacts with integrin alpha(3)beta(1) and stimulates production of pro-inflammatory mediators in primary human chondrocyte cells.
    Cellular Microbiology 03/2008; 10(2):320-31. · 4.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, disseminates from the site of deposition by Ixodes ticks to cause systemic infection. Dissemination occurs through the circulation and through tissue matrices, but the B. burgdorferi molecules that mediate interactions with the endothelium in vivo have not yet been identified. In vivo selection of filamentous phage expressing B. burgdorferi protein fragments on the phage surface identified several new candidate adhesins, and verified the activity of one adhesin that had been previously characterized in vitro. P66, a B. burgdorferi ligand for beta(3)-chain integrins, OspC, a protein that is essential for the establishment of infection in mammals, and Vls, a protein that undergoes antigenic variation in the mammal, were all selected for binding to the murine endothelium in vivo. Additional B. burgdorferi proteins for which no functions have been identified, including all four members of the OspF family and BmpD, were identified as candidate adhesins. The use of in vivo phage display is one approach to the identification of adhesins in pathogenic bacteria that are not easily grown in the laboratory, or for which genetic manipulations are not straightforward.
    Molecular Microbiology 11/2007; 66(1):262-76. · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi undergoes an infectious cycle that requires adaptation to different hosts and marked differences in environment. B. burgdorferi copes with its different environments by regulating the expression of proteins required for survival in specific settings. The B. burgdorferi oligopeptide permease (Opp) is one of only a few transporters encoded by the B. burgdorferi genome. Opp proteins in other bacteria serve multiple environmental adaptation functions. B. burgdorferi appears to broaden the usage of this transporter by utilizing five different substrate binding proteins (OppA proteins) that interact with the integral membrane components of the transporter. Expression of the OppA proteins is individually regulated and may play different roles in adaptation to host environments. Very little is known about the mechanisms used by B. burgdorferi to regulate the expression of different OppA proteins. Here we show that the alternative sigma factors, RpoS and RpoN, regulate the expression of oppA5 but not that of other oppA genes. Using a reporter assay with Escherichia coli and gel shift binding assays, we also show that the B. burgdorferi BosR/Fur homologue interacts with the oppA4 promoter and that another candidate transcription factor, EbfC, interacts with the oppA5 promoter. Binding to the promoters was confirmed by gel shift assays. Expression of BosR/Fur in its different hosts does appear to parallel the expression of oppA4. A better understanding of the factors involved in gene regulation in B. burgdorferi will help to identify coregulated proteins that may cooperate to allow the organism to survive in a specific environment.
    Journal of Bacteriology 05/2007; 189(7):2653-9. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: P66 is a chromosomally encoded 66-kDa integral outer membrane protein of the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi exhibiting channel-forming activity. Herein, we inactivated and subsequently complemented the p66 gene in the B31-A (WT) strain. The P66 protein was also inactivated in two other channel-forming protein mutant strains, P13-18 (Deltap13) and Deltabba01, and then compared with the channel-forming activities of wild-type and various p66 mutant strains. We further investigated the ion-selectivity of native, purified P66. In conclusion, we show that the porin activity of P66 is eliminated by insertional inactivation and that this activity can be rescued by gene complementation.
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 02/2007; 266(2):241-9. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    Lisa J Glickstein, Jenifer L Coburn
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    ABSTRACT: Susceptibility to Borrelia burgdorferi infection and subsequent arthritis is genetically determined in mice and determined by innate immunity. Accordingly, macrophage responses to B. burgdorferi challenge may differ between mouse strains. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were infected ex vivo with clonal B. burgdorferi strain N40. Interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production were higher in macrophages from resistant C57Bl/6 mice than in macrophages from susceptible C3H/HeJ mice. However, TNF-alpha production was observed in lower concentrations in C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4(-/-)) macrophages than in C3H/FeJ (TLR4(+/+)) macrophages, suggesting that TLR4 might contribute to the response to B. burgdorferi. A higher cytokine response to B. burgdorferi was associated with cell death in macrophages from resistant C57Bl/6 mice. Understanding variability in the response of macrophages to B. burgdorferi may contribute to understanding Lyme arthritis.
    The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 12/2006; 75(5):964-7. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Borrelia burgdorferi stimulates a robust inflammatory response at sites of localization. Binding of borrelial lipoproteins to TLR-2 is one pathway important in the host response to B. burgdorferi. However, while TLR-2 is clearly important in control of infection, inflammation is actually worsened in the absence of TLR-2 or the shared TLR adapter molecule, MyD88, suggesting that there are alternative pathways regulating inflammation. Integrins are cell surface receptors that play an important role in cell to cell communications and that can activate inflammatory signaling pathways. In this study, we report for the first time that B. burgdorferi binds to integrin alpha(3)beta(1) and that binding of B. burgdorferi to this integrin results in induction of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and end-effector molecules such as matrix metalloproteinases in primary human chondrocyte cells. Expression of these same molecules is not affected by the absence of MyD88 in murine articular cartilage, suggesting that the two pathways act independently in activating host inflammatory responses to B. burgdorferi. B. burgdorferi-induced alpha(3) signaling is mediated by JNK, but not p38 MAPK. In summary, we have identified a new host receptor for B. burgdorferi, integrin alpha(3)beta(1); binding of B. burgdorferi to integrin alpha(3)beta(1) results in the release of inflammatory mediators and is proposed as a TLR-independent pathway for activation of the innate immune response by the organism.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2006; 177(1):657-64. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Jenifer Coburn, Joshua R Fischer, John M Leong
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    ABSTRACT: The Lyme disease spirochetes, comprised of at least three closely related species, Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii, are fascinating and enigmatic bacterial pathogens. They are maintained by tick-mediated transmission between mammalian hosts, usually small rodents. The ability of these bacteria, which have relatively small genomes, to survive and disseminate in both an immunocompetent mammal and in an arthropod vector suggests that they have evolved elegant and indispensable strategies for interacting with their hosts. Recognition of specific mammalian and tick tissues is likely to be essential for successful completion of the enzootic life cycle but, given the historical difficulties in genetic manipulation of these organisms, characterization of factors promoting cell adhesion has until recently largely been confined to either the manipulation of host cells or the analysis of potential bacterial ligands in the form of recombinant proteins. These studies have led to the identification of several mammalian receptors for Lyme disease spirochetes, including glycosaminoglycans, decorin, fibronectin and integrins, as well as a tick receptor for the bacterium, and also candidate cognate bacterial ligands. Recent advances in our ability to genetically manipulate Lyme disease spirochetes, particularly B. burgdorferi, are now providing us with firm evidence that these ligands indeed do promote bacterial adherence to host cells, and with new insights into the roles of these multifacted Borrelia-host cell interactions during mammalian and arthropod infection.
    Molecular Microbiology 10/2005; 57(5):1182-95. · 4.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A classic proinflammatory T helper cell type 1 (TH1) response directed against intracellular pathogens includes the cytokine osteopontin, which acts predominantly on macrophages, where it induces the secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 and suppresses the secretion of IL-10. As cell-mediated immune responses play an important role in the resistance to Lyme arthritis, a manifestation of infection by the extracellular pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested the hypothesis that osteopontin may be required to induce T(H)1 responses and inflammation. The role of osteopontin was tested in vivo and using ex vivo macrophages in B6129F3 mice susceptible to experimental Lyme arthritis. Mice of this genetic background and those fully backcrossed to C57BL/6, which lacked osteopontin expression (spp1-/-), were as susceptible to B. burgdorferi-induced arthritis as littermate controls. Furthermore, equal numbers of spirochetes, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the B. burgdorferi gene recA in spp1-/- and B6129F3 wild-type littermates, suggested that susceptibility to infection was not dependent on this cytokine. Neither of the B6129F3 parental mouse strains lacked the ability to secrete osteopontin. spp1-/- mice and controls had immunoglobulin G2 titers, suggestive of a TH1 response. B. burgdorferi was able to directly stimulate the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha from wild-type and spp1-/- macrophages alike. These results indicate that the usually critical role of osteopontin in the induction of cellular immune responses to intracellular pathogens was circumvented by the ability of the extracellular pathogen B. burgdorferi to induce macrophages directly to produce proinflammatory cytokines.
    Journal of Leukocyte Biology 06/2005; 77(5):710-8. · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    Allen C Steere, Jenifer Coburn, Lisa Glickstein
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    ABSTRACT: Since its identification nearly 30 years ago, Lyme disease has continued to spread, and there have been increasing numbers of cases in the northeastern and north central US. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes infection by migration through tissues, adhesion to host cells, and evasion of immune clearance. Both innate and adaptive immune responses, especially macrophage- and antibody-mediated killing, are required for optimal control of the infection and spirochetal eradication. Ecological conditions favorable to the disease, and the challenge of prevention, predict that Lyme disease will be a continuing public health concern.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 05/2004; 113(8):1093-101. · 12.81 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
209.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2013
    • Medical College of Wisconsin
      • • Division of Infectious Diseases
      • • Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
      Milwaukee, WI, United States
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2003–2011
    • Tufts University
      • • Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology
      • • Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases
      Medford, MA, United States
    • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 1993–2011
    • Tufts Medical Center
      • • Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases
      • • Division of Rheumatology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2006
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2002
    • New England Baptist Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2001
    • University of Massachusetts Medical School
      • Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
      Worcester, MA, United States