Jung In Yoon

Daegu University, Daikyū, Daegu, South Korea

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Publications (14)31.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To examine the individual and synergistic anti-listerial effect of nisin and leaf essential oil of Metasequoia glyptostroboides (M. glyptostroboides) against one of the leading foodborne pathogens Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) ATCC 19116 in milk samples.
    Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine 08/2014; 7(8):602-8. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • Food and Chemical Toxicology 01/2011; 49(1):109-114. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Food Biochemistry 01/2011; 35(1):148-160. · 0.76 Impact Factor
  • Jung In Yoon, Vivek K Bajpai, Sun Chul Kang
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of nisin and cone essential oil of Metasequoia glyptostroboides against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19116 inoculated in whole (8%), low (1%) and skim (no fat content) milks. Essential oil at the concentrations of 2% and 5% revealed strong antilisterial effect against L. monocytogenes ATCC 19116 in all categories of milks. Nisin at the concentrations of 250 and 500 IU/ml displayed a remarkable antilisterial effect as compared to the control group. Also, the synergistic combinations of cone essential oil (1% and 2%) and nisin (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 IU/ml) had a remarkable antilisterial activity in all categories of whole, low and skim milks after 14 days. Results of this study indicate that the cone essential oil of M. glyptostroboides might be a useful candidate for using in food industry to control the growth of pathogenic microorganisms.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 10/2010; 49(1):109-14. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to examine the efficacy of essential oil from seeds of Zizyphus jujuba for its potential role on hair growth by in vivo method. Essential oil was applied at different concentrations (0.1%, 1% and 10%) over the shaved skin onto the backs of BALB/c mice and monitored for 21 days. After 21 days, mice treated with 1% and 10% of oil produced a greater effect on the length of hair which were measured to be 9.96 and 10.02 mm, respectively, as compared to the control (8.94 mm). We measured the weight of hair/cm(2) area of dorsal skin and also evaluated hair thickness and hair follicles microscopically after plucking the hair immediately from the shaved area of mice and found the best results for 1% of essential oil-treated mice. From this study, it is concluded that Z. jujuba essential oil possesses hair growth promoting activity.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 03/2010; 48(5):1350-4. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of essential oil from seeds of Zizyphus jujuba on TPA-induced skin inflammation in experimental mice. Exposure of TPA on the ear of the BALB/c mice caused a marked increase in both ear thickness and skin water content. The ear thickness was measured for TPA-induced ear was 0.54 mm, as compared to control (0.23 mm). Treatment with 1% and 10% of essential oil caused significant decrease in ear thicknesses which were measured to be 0.30 and 0.35 mm, as well as reduce the water content about 51% and 53% in the TPA-induced skin inflammation model, respectively. Furthermore, histological analysis clearly confirmed that Z. jujuba essential oil inhibited the inflammatory responses of skin inflammation in animal model. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that the essential oil of Z. jujuba seeds might accelerate the development of new drugs for various inflammatory diseases.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 11/2009; 48(2):639-43. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    Vivek K Bajpai, Jung In Yoon, Sun Chul Kang
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    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out to assess the antioxidant and antidermatophytic activities of the essential oil and extracts of Magnolia liliflora Desr. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The free radical scavenging activities of the oil and ethyl acetate extract were found to be superior (IC(50) values=10.11 and 16.17 microg/ml, respectively) as compared to butylatedhydreoxyanisole (BHA), (IC(50) value=18.27 microg/ml). Also the ethyl acetate extract revealed the highest phenolic contents (96.13 mg/g of dry wt) as compared to the other extracts. Further, the oil (1000 microg/disc) and extracts (1500 microg/disc) revealed 42.36-63.12% and 19.07-54.14% antidermatophytic effect, respectively along with their respective MIC values ranging from 62.5 to 500 and 250 to 2000 microg/ml against the members of Trichophyton and Microsporum spp. Also the oil had strong detrimental effect on spore germination of tested fungal pathogens as well as concentration and time dependent kinetic inhibition of Microsporum canis KCTC 6348. The results of this study justify a potential role of M. liliflora to serve as a natural antioxidant and antidermatophytic agent.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 08/2009; 47(10):2606-12. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    Vivek K Bajpai, Jung In Yoon, Sun Chul Kang
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to assess the in vitro antifungal potential of the essential oil and n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Nandina domestica Thunb. against dermatophytes, the casual agents of superficial infections in animals and human beings. The oil (1,000 microg/disc) and extracts (1,500 microg/disc) revealed 31.1-68.6% and 19.2-55.1% antidermatophytic effect against Trichophyton rubrum KCTC 6345, T. rubrum KCTC 6375, T. rubrum KCTC 6352, Trichophyton mentagrophytes KCTC 6085, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6077, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6316, Microsporum canis KCTC 6591, M. canis KCTC 6348, and M. canis KCTC 6349, respectively, along with their respective minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 62.5 to 500 and 125 to 2,000 microg/ml. Also, the oil had strong detrimental effect on spore germination of all the tested dermatophytic fungi as well as concentration and time-dependent kinetic inhibition of T. rubrum KCTC 6375. The present results demonstrated that N. domestica mediated oil and extracts could be potential sources of natural fungicides to control certain important dermatophytic fungi.
    Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 06/2009; 83(6):1127-33. · 3.69 Impact Factor
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    Vivek K Bajpai, Jung In Yoon, Sun Chul Kang
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to assess the antioxidant and antidermatophytic potential of the essential oil and extracts (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol) of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Miki ex Hu. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The free radical scavenging activities of the oil and ethyl acetate extract were found to be superior (IC(50)=9.1 and 14.24 microg/ml, respectively) as compared to butylatedhydroxyanisole (BHA), (IC(50)=18.27 microg/ml). Also the ethyl acetate extract revealed the highest phenolic contents (93.26 mg/g of dry wt) as compared to the other extracts. Further, oil (1250 microg/disc) and extracts (1750 microg/disc) revealed 35.33-67.66 and 18.0-53.3% antidermatophytic effect, respectively, along with their respective MIC values (62.5-500 and 250-4000 microg/ml) against Trichophyton rubrum KCTC 6345, T. rubrum KCTC 6375, T. rubrum KCTC 6352, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6085, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6077, T. mentagrophytes KCTC 6316, Microsporum canis KCTC 6591, M. canis KCTC 6348 and M. canis KCTC 6349. The oil also had a strong detrimental effect on spore germination as well as concentration and time-dependent kinetic inhibition of M. canis KCTC 6591.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 04/2009; 47(6):1355-61. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    The plant pathology journal 01/2009; 26(2):185-188. · 0.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Poncirus trifoliata Rafin. is widely used in oriental medicine because of its beneficiary effects on health. In this study, we examined the chemical compositions of the volatile oil isolated from the seeds of P. trifoliata by hydrodistillation, and tested the efficacy of the oil and various organic extracts as an antibacterial potential against a panel of foodborne pathogens. RESULTS: The hydrodistilled volatile oil was analysed by GC–MS. Thirty-six compounds representing 90.67% of the total oil were identified, of which veridiflorol, spathulenol, α-humulene, α-cadinol, δ-cadinene, T-muurolol, hexadecanoic acid, germacrene D, bergaptene and aromadendrene were the major volatile compounds. The oil and the organic extracts of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol revealed a remarkable antibacterial effect against the tested pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, S. enteritidis and Escherichia coli. Also, the oil had strong detrimental effect on the viable count of the tested bacteria. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that the oil and organic extracts derived from P. trifoliata seeds might be a potential source of a preservative for the food or pharmaceutical industries.
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 01/2009; 89(5). · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cleistocalyx operculatus (Roxb.) Merr and Perry buds (Myrtaceae) are widely used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastric ailments as well as an antiseptic agent in China, Vietnam and some other tropical countries. However, to be clinically useful, more scientific data are needed. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of the C. operculatus buds (EO-CO). In the applied tests, EO-CO significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), in RAW 264.7 cells, a mouse macrophage-like cell line. Also the mRNA expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta was suppressed by treatment with EO-CO in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, reporter gene analysis revealed that the EO-CO significantly blocked LPS-induced transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB in RAW 264.7 cells. Nuclear translocation of p65 subunit was also suppressed by EO-CO treatment. In addition, EO-CO inhibited phorbol ester-induced increase in ear swelling and skin water content in BALB/c mice. These results suggest that EO-CO might exert an anti-inflammatory effect by suppressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines which is mediated, at least in part, by blocking NF-kappaB activation.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 01/2009; 47(2):449-53. · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    Food and Chemical Toxicology 01/2009; 47(6):1355-1361. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    Food and Chemical Toxicology. 01/2009; 47(10):2606-2612.