Pierre-André Cazenave

Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (32)146.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Plasmodium falciparum infection generally induces elevated total plasma levels of immunoglobulins, some of which recognize self- or parasite-specific antigens. To our knowledge, we are the first to report high levels of functional immunoglobulin E (IgE) autoantibodies recognizing brain 14-3-3 protein ε in asymptomatic P. falciparum malaria. 14-3-3 ε protein belongs to a family of proteins that binds to CD81, a member of the tetraspanin superfamily elicited in hepatocyte invasion by sporozoites. Levels of expression of 14-3-3 ε protein were found to be increased in vivo and in vitro during Plasmodium yoelii and P. falciparum intrahepatic development. Collectively, these results indicate that self-reactive IgE is produced during malaria. In addition, the negative correlation between levels of self-reactive IgE to 14-3-3 ε protein and parasitemia in asymptomatic malaria due to P. falciparum supports a role for these IgE molecules in defense mechanisms, probably by interfering with development of liver-stage parasites through the CD81 pathway.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 09/2012; · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    Malaria Journal 01/2010; · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Analysis of the B cell repertoire is complicated by the huge diversity inherent in the germ line determined combinatory. Making use of knockout technology, K-deficient mice have been obtained. They constitute a shrewd model to follow the expression of an Ig minilocus, such as the λ one, in the normal condition compared with classical transgenic models. Indeed, in contrast to wild type mice, in which only 5% of λ B cells are produced, these mutant mice exclusively produce λ positive B cells. Although, the λ locus is well characterized and has a relatively simple organization, the mechanistic and selective pressures that govern its utilization are still poorly understood. The analysis of the λ B cell repertoire in K-deficient mice, should therefore bring more conclusive informations. Here we present the λ subtype distribution in the various cellular compartments of the K-deficient mice, and discuss the rules that can be responsible for this distribution. Our recent data indicate that the λ subtype proportions in the bone marrow and the spleen result, for the major part, from mechanistic processes (i.e., recombinase accessibility, production of V-J functional joint and H/L pairings) while the λ proportions found in the peritoneal cavity ensue from selective processes. Finally, the capacity to respond to various antigens is discussed from such a generated λ B cell repertoire.
    07/2009; 13(4):357-368.
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    ABSTRACT: In murine models of malaria, an early proinflammatory response has been associated with the resolution of blood-stage infection. To dissect the protective immune mechanism that allow the control of parasitaemia, the early immune response of C57BL/6 mice induced during a non-lethal plasmodial infection was analysed. Mice were infected with Plasmodium yoelii 265BY sporozoites, the natural invasive form of the parasite, in order to complete its full life cycle. The concentrations of three proinflammatory cytokines in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA at different time points of infection. The contribution of the liver and the spleen to this cytokinic response was evaluated and the cytokine-producing lymphocytes were identified by flow cytometry. The physiological relevance of these results was tested by monitoring parasitaemia in genetically deficient C57BL/6 mice or wild-type mice treated with anti-cytokine neutralizing antibody. Finally, the cytokinic response in sera of mice infected with parasitized-RBCs was analysed. The early immune response of C57BL/6 mice to sporozoite-induced malaria is characterized by a peak of IFN-gamma in the serum at day 5 of infection and splenic CD4 T lymphocytes are the major producer of this cytokine at this time point. Somewhat unexpected, the parasitaemia is significantly lower in P. yoelii-infected mice in the absence of IFN-gamma. More precisely, at early time points of infection, IFN-gamma favours parasitaemia, whereas helping to clear efficiently the blood-stage parasites at later time points. Interestingly, the early IFN-gamma burst is induced by the pre-erythrocytic stage. These results challenge the current view regarding the role of IFN-gamma on the control of parasite growth since they show that IFN-gamma is not an essential mediator of protection in P. yoelii-infected C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, the mice parasitaemia is more efficiently controlled in the absence of an early IFN-gamma production, suggesting that this cytokine promotes parasite's growth. Finally, this early burst of IFN-gamma is induced by the pre-erythrocytic stage, showing the impact of this stage on the immune response taking place during the subsequent erythrocytic stage.
    Malaria Journal 02/2009; 8:128. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main processes in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum involved sequestration of parasitized red blood cells and immunopathological responses. Among immune factors, IgG autoantibodies to brain antigens are increased in P. falciparum infected patients and correlate with disease severity in African children. Nevertheless, their role in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria (CM) is not fully defined. We extended our analysis to an Indian population with genetic backgrounds and endemic and environmental status different from Africa to determine if these autoantibodies could be either a biomarker or a risk factor of developing CM. We investigated the significance of these self-reactive antibodies in clinically well-defined groups of P. falciparum infected patients manifesting mild malaria (MM), severe non-cerebral malaria (SM), or cerebral malaria (CM) and in control subjects from Gondia, a malaria epidemic site in central India using quantitative immunoprinting and multivariate statistical analyses. A two-fold complete-linkage hierarchical clustering allows classifying the different patient groups and to distinguish the CM from the others on the basis of their profile of IgG reactivity to brain proteins defined by PANAMA Blot. We identified beta tubulin III (TBB3) as a novel discriminant brain antigen in the prevalence of CM. In addition, circulating IgG from CM patients highly react with recombinant TBB3. Overall, correspondence analyses based on singular value decomposition show a strong correlation between IgG anti-TBB3 and elevated concentration of cluster-II cytokine (IFNgamma, IL1beta, TNFalpha, TGFbeta) previously demonstrated to be a predictor of CM in the same population. Collectively, these findings validate the relationship between antibody response to brain induced by P. falciparum infection and plasma cytokine patterns with clinical outcome of malaria. They also provide significant insight into the immune mechanisms associated to CM by the identification of TBB3 as a new disease-specific marker and potential therapeutic target.
    PLoS ONE 01/2009; 4(12):e8245. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A comparative analysis of the plasma concentrations of soluble Fas-L (sFas-L) and their correlation with he-moglobin levels and malaria severity was carried out in cohorts of P. falciparum-infected patients from Gabon and India. Young patients from Gabon had plasma levels of sFas-L that increased with disease severity. In contrast, in Indian adults plasmatic sFas-L levels were more elevated in UM and SNCM than in CM. In both Gabonese and Indian subjects, sFas-L concentrations were negatively correlated with haemoglobin rates, which were lower in SNCM than in UM or CM in both populations. We also observed a positive correlation between the level of plasmatic sFas-L with the level of circulating IL-2 receptor in the Indian patients. All these observations suggest a paradoxical role of sFas-L in CM pathogenesis when comparing Gabonese and Indian patients, while a similar role was found to be associated with severe anaemia.
    01/2009; 2:17-23.
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    ABSTRACT: In the present report, we revisited the B cell responsiveness of 7 wild-derived mouse strains to various toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L). We found that 2 of them, namely PWK and STF presented profound defects in B cell proliferative responses to most of the TLR-L. Yet, their macrophage responses were largely unaffected, suggesting that regulation of TLR pathways are distinct in B cells and macrophages. We also showed that, anti-CD40 mAbs rescued the low proliferative responses to CpG in both PWK and STF B cells. In the other hand, CpG synergized with LPS to induce high levels of proliferation in STF B cells, which did not respond to LPS alone. Cytokine or immunoglobulin (Ig) productions, in vitro, were less impaired than the proliferative responses to LPS or CpG alone. In STF B cells, both ERK, P38 and JNK pathways were affected following in vitro TLR4 or TLR9 signaling. Moreover, while the basal levels of Ig secreting cells and of serum Igs were similar to that of control mice, antibody responses to both TI and TD antigens were severely affected, mainly in STF mice. Our findings therefore highlight the relevance of wild-derived mouse strains and TLR-L to study B cell physiology.
    Molecular Immunology 11/2008; 46(4):601-12. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    Molecular Immunology. 08/2008; 45(14):3863.
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    ABSTRACT: Mouse T-cell development is unfinished at birth and continues during the first month of life, when T cells exit from the thymus and colonize secondary hematopoietic organs to build up a peripheral T-cell repertoire. T-cell responses against beta-cell-derived autoantigens are initiated in the pancreatic lymph nodes (PLN) of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice during the same time period. We hypothesized that the combined effect of T-cell development and T-cell activation against tissue-specific antigens would create unique TCR repertoires in two different lymph node stations in NOD mice. To test this hypothesis, we determined the length distribution of the third complementarity-determining region (CDR3) of the TCR in the PLN and the inguinal lymph nodes (ILN) of 10, 14, 18 and 22-day-old NOD females. The analysis of all the BV genes revealed significant perturbations of the repertoire between days 10 and 22 but with no statistical differences between the PLN and ILN repertoires. In contrast, when a set of BV chains were amplified using BJ-specific primers, several unique TCR perturbations were observed in the PLN compared to the ILN. We propose that the TCR repertoire in peripheral lymph nodes of NOD mice develops dynamically between 10 and 22 days of age as a result of a developmental process. On top of that development, the local environment may fine-tune that repertoire, possibly by means of stimulation of T cells by tissue-specific antigens presented by local APC.
    Molecular Immunology 07/2008; 45(11):3059-64. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vertebrates, the world of antigenic motifs is matched to large populations of lymphocytes through specific recognition of an epitope by a given receptor unique to a lymphocyte clone. The concept of immune repertoire was proposed to describe this diversity of lymphocyte receptors - Ig and TCR - required by the network of interactions. The immune repertoires became useful tools to describe lymphocyte and receptor populations through the development of the immune system and in pathological situations. Recently, the development of mass technologies made possible a comprehensive survey of immune repertoires at the genome, transcript and protein levels, and some of these techniques have been already adapted to TCR and Ig repertoire analyses. Such approaches generate very big datasets, which necessitates complex and multi-parametric annotations in dedicated databases. They also require new analysis methods, leading to the integration of structure and dynamics of the immune repertoires, at different time scales (immune response, development of the individual, evolution of the species). Such methods may be extended to the analysis of new classes of adaptive-like receptors, which were recently discovered in different invertebrates and in agnathans. Ultimately, they may allow a parallel monitoring of pathogen and immune repertoires addressing the reciprocal influences that decide for the host survival or death. In this review, we first study the characteristics of Ig and TCR repertoires, and we examine several systematic approaches developed for the analysis of these "classical" immune repertoires at different levels. We then consider examples of the recent developments of modeling and statistical analysis, and we discuss their relevance and their importance for the study of the immune diversity. An extended view of immune repertoires is proposed, integrating the diversity of other receptors involved in immune recognition. Also, we discuss how repertoire studies could link pathogen variation and immune diversity to reveal regulatory patterns and rules driving their co-diversification race.
    Molecular Immunology 06/2008; 45(9):2437-45. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In common laboratory mouse strains, which are derived from the crossing between three subspecies, peritoneal B cells are enriched in B-1a cells characterized by the CD5(+)Mac-1(+)B220(low)IgM(high)IgD(low)CD43(+)CD9(+) phenotype. Intriguingly in other vertebrates, CD5(+)Mac-1(+) cells have never been found in a specific anatomic site. To ascertain the peculiarity of the CD5(+) peritoneal B cells in laboratory mice, we analyzed the peritoneal B cell subsets in 9 inbred and 39 outbred wild-derived mouse strains belonging to 13 different species/subspecies. We found that most of these strains do not have the CD5(+) B-1a cell population. However, all of these strains including classical laboratory mouse strains, have variable proportions of a novel B cell population: Bw, which is characterized by a unique phenotype (CD5(-)Mac-1(+)B220(high)IgM(high)IgD(high)CD43(-)CD9(-)) and is not restricted to the peritoneal cavity. Bw cells are also distinct from both B-1 and B-2 cells from a functional point of view both by proliferative responses, cytokine secretion and Ab synthesis. Moreover, transfer experiments show that bone marrow and fetal liver cells from wild mice can give rise to Bw cells in alymphoid mice. The conservation of this B cell population, but not of the CD5(+) B-1a, during evolution of the genus Mus, its readiness to respond to TLR ligands and to produce high concentration of autoantibodies suggest that Bw cells play a key role in innate immunity.
    The Journal of Immunology 12/2007; 179(10):6568-78. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pathogenic CD8+ T cells are implicated in the physiopathological mechanisms leading to experimental cerebral malaria (CM) in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infected mice. Therefore, we hypothesised that in CM susceptible mice the neuropathology could be, at least in part, the result of an inefficient control of pathogenic effector T cells by CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells. Remarkably, the number of CD4+ CD25high T cells expressing Foxp3 increased in the spleen during the course of infection. These cells displayed an activated phenotype and consistent with that, CD4+ CD25high Treg cells isolated from PbA-infected mice showed an enhanced regulatory activity in vitro. Surprisingly, these cells do not migrate to the brain at the time of neurological symptoms as the conventional CD4+ T cells do. CM was not exacerbated in anti-CD25 treated mice when infected with PbA one month after treatment, even if splenic CD8+ T cells expressing CD69 increased in these mice. Taken together, these results show that P. berghei infection leads to an increase of the number of splenic CD4+ CD25high Treg cells exhibiting in vitro suppressive function, but they do not seem to be involved in vivo in the protection against CM.
    International Journal for Parasitology 08/2007; 37(8-9):963-73. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NKT cells are a population of innate-like lymphocytes that display effector functions and immunoregulatory properties. We characterized the NKT cell response induced in C57BL/6 mice during a primary infection with Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites. We observed a heterogeneous NKT cell response that differed between liver and spleen. Hepatic NKT cells found in infected livers consisted mainly of CD1d-dependent CD4+ and double-negative (DN) NKT cells, whereas CD1d-independent NKT cells exhibiting a TCR(high) CD4(high) phenotype were prominent among splenic NKT cells during the infection. Hepatic and splenic NKT cells isolated from infected mice were activated and secreted mainly gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to stimulation. Finally, P. yoelii-activated hepatic DN NKT cells inhibited the parasite's liver stage in a CD1d-dependent manner in vitro. However, experiments using B6.CD1d-deficient mice showed that CD1d and CD1d-restricted NKT cells are not necessary to control the parasite's development in vivo during neither the preerythrocytic stage nor the erythrocytic stage. Thus, our results show that a primary P. yoelii infection induces a heterogeneous and organ-specific response of NKT cells and that CD1d-dependent NKT cells play a minor role in the control of the development of Plasmodium in vivo in our model.
    Infection and Immunity 06/2007; 75(5):2511-22. · 4.07 Impact Factor
  • Nature Medicine 04/2007; 13(3):237. · 22.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increase of serum levels of IgE during Plasmodium falciparum infections in individuals living in endemic areas. These IgEs either protect against malaria or increase malaria pathogenesis. To get an insight into the exact role played by IgE in the outcome of P. falciparum infection, total IgE levels and functional anti-parasite IgE response were studied in children and adults, from two different endemic areas Gabon and India, exhibiting either uncomplicated malaria, severe non cerebral malaria or cerebral malaria, in comparison with control individuals. Blood samples were collected from controls and P. falciparum-infected patients before treatment on the day of hospitalization (day 0) in India and, in addition, on days 7 and 30 after treatment in Gabon. Total IgE levels were determined by ELISA and functional P. falciparum-specific IgE were estimated using a mast cell line RBL-2H3 transfected with a human Fcepsilon RI alpha-chain that triggers degranulation upon human IgE cross-linking. Mann Whitney and Kruskall Wallis tests were used to compare groups and the Spearman test was used for correlations. Total IgE levels were confirmed to increase upon infection and differ with level of transmission and age but were not directly related to the disease phenotype. All studied groups exhibited functional parasite-specific IgEs able to induce mast cell degranulation in vitro in the presence of P. falciparum antigens. Plasma IgE levels correlated with those of IL-10 in uncomplicated malaria patients from Gabon. In Indian patients, plasma IFN-gamma , TNF and IL-10 levels were significantly correlated with IgE concentrations in all groups. Circulating levels of total IgE do not appear to correlate with protection or pathology, or with anti-inflammatory cytokine pattern bias during malaria. On the contrary, the P. falciparum-specific IgE response seems to contribute to the control of parasites, since functional activity was higher in asymptomatic and uncomplicated malaria patients than in severe or cerebral malaria groups.
    Malaria Journal 02/2007; 6:1. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypergammaglobulinemia and polyclonal B-cell activation commonly occur in Plasmodium sp. infections. Some of the antibodies produced recognize self-components and are correlated with disease severity in P. falciparum malaria. However, it is not known whether some self-reactive antibodies produced during P. falciparum infection contribute to the events leading to cerebral malaria (CM). We show here a correlation between self-antibody responses to a human brain protein and high levels of circulating TNF alpha (TNFalpha), with the manifestation of CM in Gabonese children. To study the role of self-reactive antibodies associated to the development of P. falciparum cerebral malaria, we used a combination of quantitative immunoblotting and multivariate analysis to analyse correlation between the reactivity of circulating IgG with a human brain protein extract and TNFalpha concentrations in cohorts of uninfected controls (UI) and P. falciparum-infected Gabonese children developing uncomplicated malaria (UM), severe non-cerebral malaria (SNCM), or CM. The repertoire of brain antigens recognized by plasma IgGs was more diverse in infected than in UI individuals. Anti-brain reactivity was significantly higher in the CM group than in the UM and SNCM groups. IgG self-reactivity to brain antigens was also correlated with plasma IgG levels and age. We found that 90% of CM patients displayed reactivity to a high-molecular mass band containing the spectrin non-erythroid alpha chain. Reactivity with this band was correlated with high TNFalpha concentrations in CM patients. These results strongly suggest that an antibody response to brain antigens induced by P. falciparum infection may be associated with pathogenic mechanisms in patients developing CM.
    PLoS ONE 02/2007; 2(4):e389. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various components of innate and adaptive immunity contribute to host defenses against Plasmodium infection. We investigated the contribution of NK cells to the immune response to primary infection with Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites in C57BL/6 mice. We found that hepatic and splenic NK cells were activated during infection and displayed different phenotypic and functional properties. The number of hepatic NK cells increased whereas the number of splenic NK cells decreased. Expression of the Ly49 repertoire was modified in the spleen but not in the liver. Splenic and hepatic NK cells have a different inflammatory cytokines profile production. In addition, liver NK cells were cytotoxic to YAC-1 cells and P. yoelii liver stages in vitro but not to erythrocytic stages. No such activity was observed with splenic NK cells from infected mice. These in vitro results were confirmed by the in vivo observation that Rag2(-/-) mice were more resistant to sporozoite infection than Rag2(-/-) gamma c(-/-) mice, whereas survival rates were similar for the two strains following blood-stage infection. Thus, NK cells are involved in early immune mechanisms controlling Plasmodium infection, mostly at the pre-erythrocytic stage.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2006; 177(2):1229-39. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the role of interferon (IFN)- gamma , interleukin (IL)-1 beta , IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha , and transforming growth factor (TGF)- beta in clinically well-defined groups of Plasmodium falciparum-infected patients manifesting mild malaria (MM), severe noncerebral malaria (SM), or cerebral malaria (CM) and in control subjects from Gondia, a malaria-endemic site in India, as well as in healthy subjects from non-malaria-endemic areas. Two-way coupled cluster analysis revealed 2 clusters of cytokines relevant to clinical subgroups of disease. The first cluster was composed of IFN- gamma , IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-12, the levels of which were significantly increased during infection but were predominant in patients with MM and allowed us to distinguish them from patients with SM or CM. The second cluster was composed of TGF- beta , TNF- alpha , IL-10, and IL-1 beta , the levels of which were highly correlated with each other in the different clinical groups of patients and significantly increased with disease severity, particularly in CM. Discriminant analyses allowed us to propose a minimal model. Levels of cytokines such as IL-5, IL-1 beta , IL-10, and IL-2 increase with infection. Levels of IL-12, IL-5, and IL-6 discriminate severe forms of malaria from MM. Finally, levels of IL-1 beta , IL-12, and IFN- gamma are relevant for the discrimination of CM from SM: high IL-1 beta levels are associated with CM, and high IL-12 and IFN- gamma levels are associated with SM.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 08/2006; 194(2):198-207. · 5.85 Impact Factor
  • Encarnita Ferrandiz, Pierre-Andre Cazenave, Sylviane Pied, Adrien Six
    Clinical Immunology - CLIN IMMUNOL. 01/2006; 119.

Publication Stats

378 Citations
146.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2013
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Institut Pasteur
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007–2012
    • Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC)
      Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
  • 2009–2010
    • Institut Pasteur de Lille
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      • Virologie et Immunologie Moléculaires (VIM)
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2006
    • National Centre For Cell Science, Pune
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India
  • 2004
    • Institut Pasteur de Tunis
      Tunis-Ville, Tūnis, Tunisia