Randall S Friese

The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States

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Publications (183)410.66 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Quality improvement initiatives have focused primarily on preventing in-hospital complications. Patients developing complications are at a greater risk of mortality; however, factors associated with failure-to-rescue (death after major complication) in trauma patients remain undefined. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with failure-to-rescue in patients undergoing trauma laparotomy. An -8-year, retrospective analysis of patients undergoing trauma laparotomy was performed. Patients who developed major in-hospital complications were included. Major complications were defined as respiratory, infectious, cardiac, renal, or development of compartment syndrome. Regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with failure-to-rescue after we adjusted for demographics, mechanism of injury, abdominal abbreviated injury scale, initial vital signs, damage control laparotomy, and volume of crystalloids and blood products administered. A total of 1,029 patients were reviewed, of which 21% (n = 217) patients who developed major complications were included. The mean age was 39 ± 18 years, 82% were male, 61% had blunt trauma, and median abdominal abbreviated injury scale was 25 [16-34, interquartile range]. Respiratory complications (n = 77) followed by infectious complications (n = 75) were the most common complications. The failure-to-rescue rate was 15.7% (n = 34/217). Age, blunt trauma, severe head injury, uninsured status, and blood products administered on the second day were independent predictor for failure-to-rescue. When major complications develop, age, uninsured status, severity of head injury, and prolonged resuscitation are associated independently with failure-to-rescue, whereas initial resuscitation, coagulopathy, and acidosis did not predict failure to rescue. Quality-of-care programs focus in patient level should be on improving the patient's insurance status, preventing secondary brain injury, and further development of resuscitation guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Surgery 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.surg.2015.03.047 · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) is not optimal but still remains a valuable source of organ donation in trauma donors. The aim of this study was to assess national trends in DCD from trauma patients. A 12-year (2002 to 2013) retrospective analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database was performed. Outcome measures were the following: proportion of DCD donors over the years and number and type of solid organs donated. DCD resulted in procurement of 16,248 solid organs from 8,724 donors. The number of organs donated per donor remained unchanged over the study period (P = .1). DCD increased significantly from 3.1% in 2002 to 14.6% in 2013 (P = .001). There was a significant increase in the proportion of kidney (2002: 3.4% vs 2013: 16.3%, P = .001) and liver (2002: 1.6% vs 2013: 5%, P = .041) donation among DCD donors over the study period. DCD from trauma donors provides a significant source of solid organs. The proportion of DCD donors increased significantly over the last 12 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Surgery 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2015.03.013 · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) to reverse acquired (coagulopathy of trauma) and induced coagulopathy (preinjury warfarin use) is well defined. To compare outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury without warfarin therapy receiving PCC as an adjunct to fresh frozen plasma (FFP) therapy compared with patients receiving FFP therapy alone. All patients with traumatic brain injury coagulopathy without warfarin therapy who received PCC (25 IU/kg) in conjunction with FFP or FFP alone at our Level I trauma center were reviewed. Coagulopathy was defined as an international normalized ratio >1.5. The groups (PCC + FFP vs FFP alone) were matched using propensity score matching on a 1:2 ratio for age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, head Abbreviated Injury Scale score, and international normalized ratio (INR) on presentation. The primary outcome measure was time to craniotomy. Secondary outcome measures were blood product requirements, cost of therapy, and mortality. A total of 1641 patients were reviewed, 222 of whom were included (PCC + FFP, 74; FFP, 148). The mean ± standard deviation age was 46.4 ± 21.7 years, the median (range) Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (3-12), and the mean ± standard deviation INR on presentation was 1.92 ± 0.6. PCC + FFP therapy was associated with an accelerated correction of INR (P = .001) and decrease in overall pack red blood cell (P = .035) and FFP (P = .041) administration requirement. Craniotomy was performed in 26.1% of patients (n = 58). Patients who received PCC + FFP therapy had faster time to craniotomy (P = .028) compared with patients who received FFP therapy alone. PCC as an adjunct to FFP decreases the time to craniotomy with faster correction of INR and concomitant decrease in the need for blood product requirement in patients with traumatic brain injury exclusive of prehospital warfarin therapy. AIS, Abbreviated Injury ScaleFFP, fresh frozen plasmaINR, international normalized ratioPCC, prothrombin complex concentraterFVIIa, recombinant factor VIIaRHCT, repeat head computed tomography scanSD, standard deviationTBI, traumatic brain injury.
    Neurosurgery 05/2015; 76(5):601-607. DOI:10.1227/NEU.0000000000000685 · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether frail elderly adults are at greater risk of fracture after a ground-level fall (GLF) than those who are not frail. Prospective observational study. Level 1 trauma center. All elderly (≥65) adults presenting after a GLF over 1 year (N = 110; mean age ± SD 79.5 ± 8.3, 54% male). A Frailty Index (FI) was calculated using 50 preadmission frailty variables. Participants with a FI of 0.25 or greater were considered to be frail. The primary outcome measure was a new fracture; 40.1% (n = 45) of participants presented with a new fracture. The secondary outcome was discharge to an institutional facility (rehabilitation center or skilled nursing facility). Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Forty-three (38.2%) participants were frail. The median Injury Severity Score was 14 (range 9-17), and the mean FI was 0.20 ± 0.12. Frail participants were more likely than those who were not frail to have fractures (odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3, P = .01). Thirty-six (32.7%) participants were discharged to an institutional facility. Frail participants were more likely to be discharged to an institutional facility (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.08-3.09, P = .03) after a GLF. Frail individuals have a higher likelihood of fractures and discharge to an institutional facility after a GLF than those who are not frail. The FI may be used as an adjunct for decision-making when developing a discharge plan for an elderly adult after a GLF. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 04/2015; 63(4). DOI:10.1111/jgs.13338 · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mortality benefit has been demonstrated for trauma patients transported via helicopter but at great cost. This study identified patients who did not benefit from helicopter transport to our facility and demonstrates potential cost savings when transported instead by ground. We performed a 6-year (2007-2013) retrospective analysis of all trauma patients presenting to our center. Patients with a known mode of transfer were included in the study. Patients with missing data and those who were dead on arrival were excluded from the study. Patients were then dichotomized into helicopter transfer and ground transfer groups. A subanalysis was performed between minimally injured patients (ISS < 5) in both the groups after propensity score matching for demographics, injury severity parameters, and admission vital parameters. Groups were then compared for hospital and emergency department length of stay, early discharge, and mortality. Of 5,202 transferred patients, 18.9% (981) were transferred via helicopter and 76.7% (3,992) were transferred via ground transport. Helicopter-transferred patients had longer hospital (p = 0.001) and intensive care unit (p = 0.001) stays. There was no difference in mortality between the groups (p = 0.6).On subanalysis of minimally injured patients there was no difference in hospital length of stay (p = 0.1) and early discharge (p = 0.6) between the helicopter transfer and ground transfer group. Average helicopter transfer cost at our center was $18,000, totaling $4,860,000 for 270 minimally injured helicopter-transferred patients. Nearly one third of patients transported by helicopter were minimally injured. Policies to identify patients who do not benefit from helicopter transport should be developed. Significant reduction in transport cost can be made by judicious selection of patients. Education to physicians calling for transport and identification of alternate means of transportation would be both safe and financially beneficial to our system. Epidemiologic study, level III. Therapeutic study, level IV.
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 03/2015; 78(3). DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000553 · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is being used to identify traumatic intracranial aneurysms (TICA) in patients with findings such as skull fracture and intracranial haemorrhage on initial Computed Tomography (CT) scans after blunt traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the incidence of TICA in patients with blunt TBI is unknown. The aim of this study is to report the incidence of TICA in patients with blunt TBI and to assess the utility of CTA in detecting these lesions. A 10-year retrospective study (2003-2012) was performed at a Level 1 trauma centre. All patients with blunt TBI who had an initial non-contrasted head CT scan and a follow-up head CTA were included. Head CTAs were then reviewed by a single investigator and TICAs were identified. The primary outcome measure was incidence of TICA in blunt TBI. A total of 10 257 patients with blunt TBI were identified, out of which 459 patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 47.3 ± 22.5, the majority were male (65.1%) and median ISS was 16 [9-25]. Thirty-six patients (7.8%) had intracranial aneurysm, of which three patients (0.65%) had TICAs. The incidence of traumatic intracranial aneurysm was exceedingly low (0.65%) over 10-years. This study adds to the growing literature questioning the empiric use of CTA for detecting vascular injuries in patients with blunt TBI.
    Brain Injury 03/2015; 29(5):1-6. DOI:10.3109/02699052.2015.1004559 · 1.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypopituitarism after hypovolemic shock is well established in certain patient cohorts. However; the effects of hemorrhagic shock on pituitary function in trauma patients remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess pituitary hormone variations in trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. Patients with acute traumatic hemorrhagic shock presenting to our level 1 trauma center were prospectively enrolled. Hemorrhagic shock was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 90 mmHg on arrival or within 10 minutes of arrival in the emergency department, and requirement of ≥2 units of packed red blood cell transfusion. Serum cortisol and serum pituitary hormones (vasopressin [ADH], adrenocorticotrophic hormone [ACTH], thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH], follicular stimulating hormone [FSH], and luteinizing hormone [LH]) were measured in each patient on admission and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after admission. Outcome measure was variation in pituitary hormones. A total of 42 patients were prospectively enrolled; mean age was 37 ± 12 years, mean SBP 85.4 ± 64.5 mmHg, and median Injury Severity Score was 26 (range 18 to 38). There was an increase in the levels of cortisol (p < 0.001), a decrease in the levels of ACTH (p < 0.001) and ADH (p < 0.001), but no change in the levels of LH (p = 0.30), FSH (p = 0.07), and TSH (p = 0.89) over 96 hours. Ten patients died during their hospital stay. Patients who died had higher mean admission ADH levels (p = 0.03), higher mean admission ACTH levels (p < 0.001), and lower mean admission cortisol levels (p = 0.04) compared with patients who survived. Acute hypopituitarism does not occur in trauma patients with acute hemorrhagic shock. In patients who died, there was a decrease in cortisol levels, which appears to be adrenal in origin. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 03/2015; 221(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.02.026 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is focused on preventing secondary brain injury. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is an established treatment modality that has been shown to improve patient outcomes secondary to inflammatory insults. The aim of our study was to assess whether RIC in trauma patients with severe TBI could reduce secondary brain injury. This prospective consented interventional trial included all TBI patients admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with an intracranial hemorrhage and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 8 or lower on admission. In each patient, four cycles of RIC were performed within 1 hour of admission. Each cycle consisted of 5 minutes of controlled upper limb (arm) ischemia followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion using a blood pressure cuff. Serum biomarkers of acute brain injury, S-100B, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) were measured at 0, 6, and 24 hours. Outcome measure was reduction in the level of serum biomarkers after RIC. A total of 40 patients (RIC, 20; control, 20) were enrolled. The mean (SD) age was 46.15 (18.64) years, the median GCS score was 8 (interquartile range, 3-8), and the median head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score was 3 (interquartile range, 3-5), and there was no difference between the RIC and control groups in any of the baseline demographics or injury characteristics including the type and size of intracranial bleed or skull fracture patterns. There was no difference in the 0-hour S-100B (p = 0.9) and NSE (p = 0.72) level between the RIC and the control group. There was a significant reduction in the mean levels of S-100B (p = 0.01) and NSE (p = 0.04) at 6 hours and 24 hours in comparison with the 0-hour level in the RIC group. This study showed that RIC significantly decreased the standard biomarkers of acute brain injury in patients with severe TBI. Our study highlights the novel therapeutic role of RIC for preventing secondary brain insults in TBI patients. Prospective interventional study, level II.
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 03/2015; DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000584 · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol is known to be protective in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, its impact on the long-term cognitive function is unknown. We hypothesize that intoxication at the time of injury is associated with adverse long-term cognitive function in patients sustaining TBI. We performed a 2-year retrospective study of all trauma patients with isolated TBI presenting to our Level I trauma center and discharged to a single rehabilitation facility. Patients with moderate-to-severe TBI (head Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] score ≥ 3), measured admission blood alcohol concentration, and measured cognitive function on hospital discharge and rehabilitation center discharge were included. Cognitive function was assessed using Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores. Delta cognitive FIM was defined as the difference between rehabilitation center discharge and hospital discharge cognitive FIM scores. Multivariate linear regression was performed. A total of 64 patients were included. Mean (SD) age was 51.8 (23) years, median head AIS score was 3 (IQR, 3-5), and median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 11 (IQR, 3-15). Mean (SD) cognitive FIM score on hospital discharge was 17 (6), and mean (SD) cognitive improvement was 8.6 (4.7). Sixty percent (n = 39) were under the influence of alcohol on admission, and the mean (SD) admission blood alcohol concentration was 132 (102).On multivariate linear regression analysis, admission blood alcohol concentration (β = -0.4; 95% confidence interval, -6.7 to -0.8; p = 0.01) and age (β = -0.13; 95% confidence interval, -0.2 to -0.04; p = 0.04) were negatively associated with improvement in long-term cognitive function. Alcohol intoxication at the time of injury is associated with lower improvement in long-term cognitive function. Older intoxicated patients are likely to have a lower cognitive improvement. Prognostic and epidemiologic study, level III.
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 02/2015; 78(2):403-408. DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000504 · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Differences in outcomes among trauma centers (TCs) and non-TCs (NTCs) in patients undergoing emergency general surgery (EGS) are well established. However; the impact of development of certified acute care surgery (ACS) programs on patient outcomes remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes in patients undergoing EGS across TCs, NTCs, and TCs with ACS (ACS-TC). National estimates for EGS procedures were abstracted from the National Inpatient Sample database. Patients undergoing emergent procedures (appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hernia repair, as well as small and large bowel resections) were included. TCs were identified based on American College of Surgeons' verification. ACS-TC programs were recorded from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. Outcome measures were hospital length of stay, complications, and mortality. Regression analysis was performed after adjusting for age, sex, race, Charlson comorbidity index, and type of procedure. A total of 131,410 patients undergoing EGS were analyzed. Patients managed in ACS-TCs had shorter hospital stay (p = 0.045) and lower complication rate (p = 0.041) compared with patients managed in both TCs and NTCs. There was no difference in mortality in patients managed across the groups; however, there was a trend toward lower mortality in patients managed in ACS-TCs in comparison with TCs (p = 0.064) and NTCs (p = 0.089). The overall hospital costs were lower for patients managed in ACS-TCs compared with TCs (p = 0.036). TCs with ACS have improved outcomes in EGS procedures compared with both TCs and non-TCs. ACS training with the associated infrastructure standards may contribute to these improved outcomes. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.
    01/2015; 79(1):60-64. DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000687
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    ABSTRACT: To optimize neurosurgical resources, guidelines were developed at our institution, allowing the acute care surgeons to independently manage traumatic intracranial hemorrhage less than or equal to 4 mm. The aim of our study was to evaluate our established Brain Injury Guidelines (BIG 1 category) for managing patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) without neurosurgical consultation. We formulated the BIG based on a 4-year retrospective chart review of all TBI patients presenting at our Level 1 trauma center. We then prospectively implemented our BIG 1 category to identify TBI patients that were to be managed without neurosurgical consultation (No-NC). Propensity scoring matched patients with No-NC to a similar cohort of patients managed with NC before the implementation of our BIG in a 1:1 ratio for demographics, severity of injury, and type and size of intracranial hemorrhage. Primary outcome measure was need for neurosurgical intervention and 30-day readmission rates. A total of 254 TBI patients (127 of NC and 127 of No-NC patients) were included in the analysis. The mean (SD) age was 40.8 (22.7) years, 63.4% (n = 161) were male, median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 15 (range, 13-15), and median head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score was 2 (range, 2-3). There was no neurosurgical intervention or 30-day readmission in both the groups. In the No-NC group, 3.9% of the patients had postdischarge emergency department visits compared with 4.7% of the NC group (p = 0.5). All patients were discharged home from the emergency department. We validated our BIG and demonstrated that acute care surgeons can effectively care for minimally injured TBI patients with good outcomes. A national multi-institutional prospective evaluation is warranted. Therapeutic/care management, level IV.
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 12/2014; 77(6):984-8. DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000428 · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trauma centers often receive transfers from lower-level trauma centers or nontrauma hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence and pattern of secondary overtriage to our Level I trauma center. We performed a 2-year retrospective analysis of all trauma patients transferred to our Level I trauma center and discharged within 24 hours of admission. Reason for referral, referring specialty, mode of transport, and intervention details were collected. Outcomes measures were incidence of secondary overtriage as well as requirement of major or minor procedure. Major procedure was defined as surgical intervention in the operating room. Minor procedures were defined as procedures performed in the emergency department. A total of 1,846 patients were transferred to our Level I trauma center, of whom 440 (24%) were discharged within 24 hours of admission. The mean (SD) age was 35 (21) years, 72% were male, and mean (SD) Injury Severity Score (ISS) 4 (4). The most common reasons for referral were extremity fractures (31%), followed by head injury (23%) and soft tissue injuries (13%).Of the 440 patients discharged within 24 hours, 380 (86%) required only observation (268 of 380) or minor procedure (112 of 380). Minor procedures were entirely consisted of fracture management (n = 47, 42%) and wound care (n = 65, 58%). The mean (SD) interfacility transfer distance was 45 (46) miles. Mean (SD) hospital charges per transfer were $12,549 ($5,863). A significant number of patients transferred to our trauma center were discharged within 24 hours; most of them required observation and/or minor procedures. Appropriately increasing primary hospital resources, in addition to interhospital outreach in the form of education or telemedicine, should be considered to decrease the number of avoidable transfers. Epidemiologic study, level III.
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 12/2014; 77(6):969-73. DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000462 · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) guidelines recommend intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less with an abnormal head computed tomography, or a normal head computed tomography scan with systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, posturing, or in patients of age ≥40. The benefits of these guidelines on outcome remain unproven. We hypothesized that adherence to BTF guidelines for ICP monitoring does not improve outcomes in patients with TBI.
    Journal of Surgical Research 11/2014; 194(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jss.2014.11.017 · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Direct laryngoscopy (DL) has long been the gold standard for tracheal intubation in emergency and trauma patients. Video laryngoscopy (VL) is increasingly used in many settings and the purpose of this study was to compare its effectiveness to direct laryngoscopy in trauma patients. Our hypothesis was that the success rate of VL would be higher than that of DL.
    World Journal of Surgery 10/2014; 39(3). DOI:10.1007/s00268-014-2845-z · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    Sean McPhillips, Randall Friese, Gary Vercruysse
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Splenic abscesses associated with leukemia are rare. Most reported cases of splenic abscesses occur after chemotherapy and are related to the immunosuppressive effects of the chemotherapy. Their etiology is most frequently fungal. Presentation Of Case A 58-year-old male presented with splenomegaly and scrotal swelling secondary to a multibacterial splenic abscess which required a splenectomy. Upon investigation he was found to suffer from chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and epididymitis. Discussion Splenic abscesses are rarely found in leukemic patients. Reported cases are fungal and commonly occur after chemotherapy due to immunosuppression. Scrotal swelling with concurrent splenomegaly can be found in other pathologies including Brucellosis, Lyme disease and even non-Hodgkin primary testicular lymphoma. Scrotal swelling in our case was likely secondary to epididymitis and exacerbated by the effects of splenomegaly upon the systemic circulation promoting venous congestion. Conclusion This case illustrated an unusual presentation of CML because the patient presented with splenomegaly, a multibacterial splenic abscess, and scrotal swelling.
    10/2014; 5(12). DOI:10.1016/j.ijscr.2014.10.069
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of disability in bicycle riders. Preventive measures including bicycle helmet laws have been highlighted; however, its protective role has always been debated. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of bicycle helmets in prevention of intra-cranial hemorrhage. We hypothesized that bicycle helmets are protective and prevent the development of intra-cranial hemorrhage. Methods We performed a 4-year (2009–2012) retrospective cohort analysis of all the patients who presented with traumatic brain injury due to bicycle injuries to our level 1 trauma center. We compared helmeted and non-helmeted bicycle riders for differences in the patterns of injury, need for intensive care unit admissions and mortality. Results A total of 864 patients were reviewed of which, 709 patients (helmeted = 300, non-helmeted = 409) were included. Non-helmeted bicycle riders were more likely to be young (p \ 0.001) males (p = 0.01). There was no difference in the median ISS between the two groups (p = 0.3). Non-helmeted riders were more likely to have a skull fracture (p = 0.01) and a scalp laceration (p = 0.01) compared to the helmeted riders. There was no difference in intra-cranial hemorrhage between the two groups (p = 0.1). Wearing a bicycle helmet was not independently associated (p = 0.1) with development of intra-cranial hemorrhage. Conclusion Bicycle helmets may have a protective effect against external head injury but its protective role for intra-cranial hemorrhage is questionable. Further studies assessing the protective role of helmets for intra-cranial hemorrhage are warranted.
    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery 10/2014; 40(6):729-732. DOI:10.1007/s00068-014-0453-0 · 0.38 Impact Factor
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    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery 10/2014; 40(5):1-6. DOI:10.1007/s00068-014-0380-0 · 0.38 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 10/2014; 219(4):e191-e192. DOI:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2014.07.902 · 4.45 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons 10/2014; 219(4):e29-e30. DOI:10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2014.07.464 · 4.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is a known predictor of mortality in trauma patients; however, its impact on organ procurement has not been defined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of hypothermia on organ procurement. We hypothesized that admission hypothermia impedes successful organ procurement. METHODS: We performed a 5-year retrospective analysis of all trauma patients approached for organ donation. Hypothermia was defined as a core body temperature 36 degrees C/97 degrees F or less. The two groups (hypothermic [HT] vs. nonhypothermic [non-HT]) were matched in a 1:1 ratio using propensity score matching for age, sex, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure, international normalized ratio, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Primary outcome measures were eligibility for organ donation and solid organ procurement. Secondary outcome measures were blood product and vasopressor requirements. RESULTS: This study was composed of 537 brain-dead patients, of whom 416 (HT, 208; non-HT, 208) were included in the analysis. The mean (SD) age was 40.5 (23.7) years, 75% were male, mean (SD) temperature was 36.6 degrees C (1.7 degrees C), and mean (SD) systolic blood pressure was 75.35 (68.7) mm Hg. Patients who were hypothermic on presentation were less likely to be eligible for organ donation (44.7% vs. 96%, p <= 0.001), and they donated fewer organs per donor (p = 0.04). HT patients required more units of fresh frozen plasma (p = 0.04) and greater mean dose of dopamine (p = 0.03) and vasopressin (p = 0.03) compared with the non-HT patients. CONCLUSION: Admission hypothermia is associated with decreased organ donation in potential organ donors independent of admission coagulopathy, hypotension, and injury severity. Early correction of hypothermia may improve organ donation in trauma patients. Copyright (C) 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 10/2014; 77(4):559-563. DOI:10.1097/TA.0000000000000413 · 1.97 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
410.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2015
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Surgery
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2014
    • Tucson Medical Center
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2011
    • Wilford Hall Ambulatory Surgery Center
      Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, United States
  • 2010
    • Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans
      New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • 2005–2010
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • • Division of Burn/Trauma/Critical Care
      • • Department of Surgery
      Dallas, Texas, United States
  • 2009
    • Southern Adventist University
      Collegedale, Tennessee, United States
  • 2005–2008
    • University of Texas at Dallas
      Richardson, Texas, United States
  • 2006
    • Parkland Memorial Hospital
      Dallas, Texas, United States
  • 1995–2006
    • University of Colorado
      • Department of Surgery
      Denver, Colorado, United States