Adonina Tardón

University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain

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Publications (144)669 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Aberrant global DNA methylation is shown to increase cancer risk. LINE-1 has been proven a measure of global DNA methylation. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between LINE-1 methylation level and bladder cancer risk and to evaluate effect modification by environmental and genetic factors. Methods: Bisulphite-treated leukocyte DNA from 952 cases and 892 hospital controls was used to measure LINE-1 methylation level at four CpG sites by pyrosequencing. Logistic regression model was fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Interactions between LINE-1 methylation levels and environmental and genetic factors were assessed. Results: The risk of bladder cancer followed a nonlinear association with LINE-1 methylation. Compared with subjects in the middle tertile, the adjusted OR for subjects in the lower and the higher tertiles were 1.26 (95% CI 0.99-1.60, P=0.06) and 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.69, P=0.02), respectively. This association significantly increased among individuals homozygous for the major allele of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene (corrected P-interaction<0.05). Conclusions: The findings from this large-scale study suggest that both low and high levels of global DNA methylation are associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 03/2014; · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal life is the most sensitive stage of human development to environmental pollutants. Early exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. The mechanisms of transference of POPs during pregnancy are still not well understood. The present study is aimed to investigate the transfer of POPs between mother and fetus. The concentrations of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners have been measured in 308 maternal serum samples, their respective umbilical cords and 50 placental tissues from a mother-infant cohort representative of Spanish general population. In general, the adjusted lipid-basis concentrations were higher in maternal serum than in cord serum and placenta. The concentrations of most pollutants between maternal serum and cord serum and between maternal serum and placenta were significantly correlated. These distributions were consistent with a predominant maternal source that transfers the pollutants into the placenta and the fetus. However, this distribution did not correspond to passive diffusion of these compounds between these tissues according to lipid content. The compounds more readily metabolized were higher in newborns, which suggest that differences in metabolic capabilities may be responsible of the observed variations in POP distributions between mother and newborns. Prenatal exposure to 4,4'-DDT and some PBDEs such as BDE 99 and BDE 209 is much higher than it could be anticipated from the composition of maternal serum. POP exposure assessment studies of newborns may overlook the effects of some of these pollutants if they only consider maternal determinations.
    Environment international 01/2014; 65C:107-115. · 4.79 Impact Factor
  • Adonina Tardon
    Medicina Clínica 01/2014; · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal life is the most sensitive stage of human development to environmental pollutants. Early exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. The mechanisms of transference of POPs during pregnancy are still not well understood. The present study is aimed to investigate the transfer of POPs between mother and fetus. The concentrations of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners have been measured in 308 maternal serum samples, their respective umbilical cords and 50 placental tissues from a mother–infant cohort representative of Spanish general population. In general, the adjusted lipid-basis concentrations were higher in maternal serum than in cord serum and placenta. The concentrations of most pollutants between maternal serum and cord serum and between maternal serum and placenta were significantly correlated. These distributions were consistent with a predominant maternal source that transfers the pollutants into the placenta and the fetus. However, this distribution did not correspond to passive diffusion of these compounds between these tissues according to lipid content. The compounds more readily metabolized were higher in newborns, which suggest that differences in metabolic capabilities may be responsible of the observed variations in POP distributions between mother and newborns. Prenatal exposure to 4,4′-DDT and some PBDEs such as BDE 99 and BDE 209 is much higher than it could be anticipated from the composition of maternal serum. POP exposure assessment studies of newborns may overlook the effects of some of these pollutants if they only consider maternal determinations.
    Environment International. 01/2014; 65:107–115.
  • Adonina Tardon
    Medicina Clínica. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985-2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20-30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive.
    American journal of epidemiology 12/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies that have evaluated the association between exposure to gas appliances emissions at home with respiratory health in children obtained heterogeneous and limited results. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between the use of gas cooking at home during pregnancy and respiratory problems in children during their first year of life. In the years 2003 through 2008 pregnant women were enrolled in 4 Spanish areas and visited in different age-points following a common protocol. Outcomes studied (from a questionnaire) were any episode of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), wheezing, persistent cough, chestiness and otitis. The association between exposure to gas cooking at home and respiratory outcomes was assessed using logistic regression and adjusting by confounding variables. Some potential effect modifiers (i.e. smoking, fruit and vegetables consumption) were examined. Among the 2003 children included in the study, a total of 731 (36.6%) had a LRTI episode, 693 (34.6%) experienced wheezing, 302 (15.5%) a persistent cough, 939 (47.4%) chestiness and 620 (31.2%) had an episode of otitis during their first year of life. Gas cookers were present in 45.5% of homes. Exposure to gas cooking in homes was not associated with respiratory outcomes Odds Ratios (OR) were close to 1 and not statistically significant. However, a positive association was found for otitis among infants whose mothers reported low intakes of fruit and vegetables during pregnancy [OR (95%CI) = 1.38 (1.01-1.9)] and also wheezing and chestiness were associated with gas cookers among those children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. In susceptible subjects (those whose mothers smoke and consumed below average fruit and vegetables) we found an association between exposure to gas cooking during pregnancy and risk of wheezing, chestiness and otitis during the first year of life. But more research is needed regarding not only gas cooking and respiratory health but also the possible effect modifier role of diet and tobacco.
    Environmental Health 12/2013; 12(1):100. · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the main sources of and sociodemographic factors associated with second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure, assessed both by questionnaire and by urinary cotinine (UC) levels, in non-smoking pregnant women. We conducted a cross-sectional study in pregnant women from 4 different regions in Spain. A total of 1783 non-smoking pregnant women completed a questionnaire about their previous smoking habit and SHS exposure in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy and provided a urine sample for measuring UC levels. We used logistic regression models to assess the relationship between several sociodemographic variables and some potential sources of SHS exposure. In addition, we analysed the association of several sociodemographic variables and the SHS exposure according to UC levels, using Tobit regression analysis. More than half of women (55.5%) were exposed to SHS in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The following variables were associated with SHS exposure: having smoked previously, low educational level, and being primiparous. Data collection after the first law banning smoking in public places was associated with lower risk of SHS exposure in restaurants and at work. UC levels were higher among women exposed to more than one source. Having a partner who smoked at home was the source of SHS with the greatest impact on UC levels, followed by having a partner who smoked but not at home, other people smoking in the household, being exposed during leisure time, at work and at restaurants. The most important source of SHS exposure was exposure at home. Prevention of SHS exposure should be addressed not only with pregnant women but also with their families.
    Science of The Total Environment 11/2013; 470-471C:1189-1196. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2,422 bladder cancer cases and 5,751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6,911 cases and 11,814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising SNPs with P< 1x10(-5) was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1,307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P=4.53×10(-9)) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P=4.11×10(-8)). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P=7.13×10(-7)) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P=6.98×10(-7)); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis.
    Human Molecular Genetics 10/2013; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) is heterogeneous at the clinical, pathological and genetic levels. Tumor invasiveness (T) and grade (G) are the main factors associated with outcome and determine patient management. A discovery exome sequencing screen (n = 17), followed by a prevalence screen (n = 60), identified new genes mutated in this tumor coding for proteins involved in chromatin modification (MLL2, ASXL2 and BPTF), cell division (STAG2, SMC1A and SMC1B) and DNA repair (ATM, ERCC2 and FANCA). STAG2, a subunit of cohesin, was significantly and commonly mutated or lost in UBC, mainly in tumors of low stage or grade, and its loss was associated with improved outcome. Loss of expression was often observed in chromosomally stable tumors, and STAG2 knockdown in bladder cancer cells did not increase aneuploidy. STAG2 reintroduction in non-expressing cells led to reduced colony formation. Our findings indicate that STAG2 is a new UBC tumor suppressor acting through mechanisms that are different from its role in preventing aneuploidy.
    Nature Genetics 10/2013; · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increased lung cancer risks among hairdressers were observed in large registry-based cohort studies from Scandinavia, but these studies could not adjust for smoking. Our objective was to evaluate the lung cancer risk among hairdressers while adjusting for smoking and other confounders in a pooled database of 16 case-control studies conducted in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand between 1985 and 2010 (the Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies on the Joint Effects of Occupational Carcinogens in the Development of Lung Cancer). Lifetime occupational and smoking information was collected through interviews with 19,369 cases of lung cancer and 23,674 matched population or hospital controls. Overall, 170 cases and 167 controls had ever worked as hairdresser or barber. The odds ratios for lung cancer in women were 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 2.35) without adjustment for smoking and 1.12 (95% CI: 0.75, 1.68) with adjustment for smoking; however, women employed before 1954 also experienced an increased lung cancer risk after adjustment for smoking (odds ratio = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.09, 6.47). The odds ratios in male hairdressers/barbers were generally not elevated, except for an increased odds ratio for adenocarcinoma in long-term barbers (odds ratio = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.02, 4.77). Our results suggest that the increased lung cancer risks among hairdressers are due to their smoking behavior; single elevated risk estimates should be interpreted with caution and need replication in other studies.
    American journal of epidemiology 09/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.
    American journal of epidemiology 09/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    Ana Fernández-Somoano, Adonina Tardon
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    ABSTRACT: It is commonly assumed that low socioeconomic levels are associated with greater exposure to pollution, but this is not necessarily valid. Our goal was to examine how individual socioeconomic characteristics are associated with exposure levels in a Spanish region included in the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) cohort. The study population comprised 430 pregnant women from the Asturias INMA cohort. Air pollution exposure was estimated using land-use regression techniques. Information about the participants' lifestyle and socioeconomic variables was collected through questionnaires. In multivariate analysis, the levels of NO2 and benzene assigned to each woman were considered as dependent variables. Other variables included in the models were residential zone, age, education, parity, smoking, season, working status during pregnancy and social class. The average NO2 level was 23.60 (SD=6.50) μg/m(3). For benzene, the mean value was 2.31 (SD=1.32) μg/m(3). We found no association of any pollutant with education. We observed an association between social class and benzene levels. Social classes I and II had the highest levels. The analysed socioeconomic and lifestyle variables accounted for little variability in air pollution in the models; this variability was explained mainly by residential zone (adjusted R(2): 0.27 for NO2; 0.09 for benzene). Education and social class were not clearly associated with pollution. Administrations should monitor the environment of residential areas regardless of the socioeconomic level, and they should increase the distances between housing and polluting sources to prevent settlements at distances that are harmful to health.
    Journal of epidemiology and community health 09/2013; · 3.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Some studies have suggested increased lung cancer risks among bakers, however the results overall were inconsistent. The authors studied lung cancer risks among bakers and baking-related occupations in the SYNERGY pooled case-control database from 16 countries. Occupation in a baking-related job was identified from the subjects' job histories. ORs adjusted for log(age), study centre, smoking behaviour and ever employment in a job with known exposure to occupational lung carcinogens were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. Findings were stratified by sex, histological subtype of lung cancer and smoking status. 19 366 cases (15 606 men) and 23 670 control subjects (18 528 men) were included. 473 cases (415 men, 58 women) and 501 controls (437 men, 64 women) had ever worked in baking or a related job. We did not observe an increased risk for men in baking (OR 1.01; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.18). No linear trends were observed for duration of employment. Some results suggested increased lung cancer risks for women, for example, for working as a baker for >30 years and in never-smokers, but after exclusion of one study these increased risks disappeared. The findings from this study do not suggest increased lung cancer risks in baking-related professions.
    Occupational and environmental medicine 08/2013; · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Altered DNA methylation has been associated with various diseases. Objective: To evaluate the association between levels of methylation in leukocyte DNA at long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and genetic and non-genetic characteristics of 892 control participants from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study. Methods: We determined LINE-1 methylation levels by pyrosequencing. Individual data included demographics, smoking status, nutrient intake, toenail concentrations of 12 trace elements, xenobiotic metabolism gene variants, and 515 polymorphisms among 24 genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathway. To assess the association between LINE-1 methylation levels (percentage of methylated cytosines) and potential determinants, we estimated beta coefficients (β) by robust linear regression. Results: Females had lower levels of LINE-1 methylation than males (β=-0.7, p-value=0.02). Blond tobacco smokers showed lower methylation than non-smokers (β=-0.7, p-value=0.03). Arsenic toenail concentration was inversely associated with LINE-1 methylation (β=-3.6, p-value=0.003). By contrast, iron (β=0.002, p-value=0.009) and nickel (β=0.02, p-value=0.004) were positively associated with LINE-1 methylation. SNPs in DNMT3A (rs7581217-per allele, β=0.3, p-value=0.002), TCN2 (rs9606756-GG, β=1.9, p-value=0.008; rs4820887-AA, β=4.0, p-value=4.8×10-7; rs9621049-TT, β=4.2, p-value=4.7×10-9), AS3MT (rs7085104-GG, β=0.7, p-value=0.001), SLC19A1 (rs914238, TC vs. TT: β=0.5 and CC vs. TT: β=-0.3, global p-value=0.0007) and MTHFS (rs1380642, CT vs. CC: β=0.3 and TT vs. CC; β=-0.8, global p-value=0.05) were associated with LINE-1 methylation. Conclusions: We identified several characteristics, environmental factors, and common genetic variants that predicted DNA methylation among study participants.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 06/2013; 121:650-656. · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lifetime exposure to trihalomethanes (THM) has been associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. We explored methods of analyzing bladder cancer risk associated with 4 THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) as surrogates for disinfection by-product (DBP) mixtures in a case-control study in Spain (1998-2001). Lifetime average concentrations of THM in the households of 686 incident bladder cancer cases and 750 matched hospital-based controls were calculated. Several exposure metrics were modeled through conditional logistic regression, including the following analyses: total THM (μg/L), cytotoxicity-weighted sum of total THM (pmol/L), 4 THM in separate models, 4 THM in 1 model, chloroform and the sum of brominated THM in 1 model, and a principal-components analysis. THM composition, concentrations, and correlations varied between areas. The model for total THM was stable and showed increasing dose-response trends. Models for separate THM provided unstable estimates and inconsistent dose-response relationships. Risk estimation for specific THM is hampered by the varying composition of the mixture, correlation between species, and imprecision of historical estimates. Total THM (μg/L) provided a proxy measure of DBPs that yielded the strongest dose-response relationship with bladder cancer risk. A variety of metrics and statistical approaches should be used to evaluate this association in other settings.
    American journal of epidemiology 05/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Iodine supplementation during pregnancy is a common practice in developed countries. However, scant evidence is available regarding the safety and effectiveness of maternal iodine supplementation with regard to child neuropsychological development. We previously reported an inverse association between iodine supplementation and the psychomotor development of infants in a birth cohort from Valencia, Spain. In the present study, we assessed this association in a wider sample of mother and child pairs from 3 other regions in Spain. Neuropsychological development was assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development in 1,519 infants (median age, 16 months) between 2006 and 2009. In multivariate analyses, maternal consumption of 150 μg/day or more of iodine from supplements was related to a 1.5-fold increase in the odds of a psychomotor score less than 85 (95% confidence interval: 0.8, 2.9) and to a 1.7-fold increase in the odds of a mental score less than 85 (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 3.0). Findings previously reported in the Valencia cohort were only partially verified. The results of the present study suggest that, at least in these regions, iodine supplementation does not improve infant neuropsychological development at 1 year of age. Further research is needed on the risks and benefits of supplementary iodine for both maternal thyroid function and child neurodevelopment.
    American journal of epidemiology 04/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bladder cancer results from the combined effects of environmental and genetic factors, smoking being the strongest risk factor. Evaluating absolute risks resulting from the joint effects of smoking and genetic factors is critical to assess the public health relevance of genetic information. Analyses included up to 3,942 cases and 5,680 controls of European background in seven studies. We tested for multiplicative and additive interactions between smoking and 12 susceptibility loci, individually and combined as a polygenic risk score (PRS). Thirty-year absolute risks and risk differences by levels of the PRS were estimated for U.S. males aged 50 years. Six of 12 variants showed significant additive gene-environment interactions, most notably NAT2 (P = 7 × 10(-4)) and UGT1A6 (P = 8 × 10(-4)). The 30-year absolute risk of bladder cancer in U.S. males was 6.2% for all current smokers. This risk ranged from 2.9% for current smokers in the lowest quartile of the PRS to 9.9% for current smokers in the upper quartile. Risk difference estimates indicated that 8,200 cases would be prevented if elimination of smoking occurred in 100,000 men in the upper PRS quartile compared with 2,000 cases prevented by a similar effort in the lowest PRS quartile (Padditive = 1 × 10(-4)). Thus, the potential impact of eliminating smoking on the number of bladder cancer cases prevented is larger for individuals at higher than lower genetic risk. Our findings could have implications for targeted prevention strategies. However, other smoking-related diseases, as well as practical and ethical considerations, need to be considered before any recommendations could be made. Cancer Res; 73(7); 1-10. ©2012 AACR.
    Cancer Research 03/2013; · 8.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the relationship between indoor and outdoor swimming pool attendance and respiratory symptoms and infections during the first year of life. A population-based mother-child cohort study was conducted in four Spanish areas (INMA project). Study subjects were recruited at pregnancy, followed to delivery and 14 months after birth. Information on swimming pool attendance and health manifestations during the first year of life was collected at 14 months: low respiratory tract infection (LRTI), persistent cough, wheezing, atopic eczema and otitis. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence interval (OR 95 %CI) were calculated by logistic regression adjusting for confounders. Among the 2,205 babies included, 37 % reported having LRTI, 37 % wheezing, 16 % persistent cough, 22 % atopic eczema, 33 % otitis and 50 % attended swimming pools during the first year of life. Around 40 % went to outdoor pools in summer with a median cumulative duration of 7.5 h/year, and 20 % attended indoor pools with a median cumulative duration of 18 h/year. Pool attendance differed by area, season of birth and sociodemographic characteristics, and was not associated with LRTI, wheezing, persistent cough, atopic eczema or otitis. Adjusted OR of wheezing and LRTI were, respectively, 1.06 (95 %CI, 0.88-1.28) and 1.09 (0.90-1.31) for babies attending vs. babies not attending pools. Stratification by type of swimming pool, cumulative duration or parental atopy did not modify the results. Conclusion: No association was detected between pool attendance and LRTI, wheezing, persistent cough, atopic eczema or otitis during the first year of life in Spain.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 03/2013; · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An infectious etiology for bladder cancer has long been suspected. Merkel cell virus (MCV), BKV and JCV polyomaviruses are possible causative agents but data remain scarce. Therefore, we evaluated the seroresponse to these three polyomaviruses in association with bladder cancer risk. 1135 incident bladder cancer subjects from 5 Spanish regions and 982 hospital controls matched by sex, age and region were included. 99% of cases were urothelial-cell carcinomas. Antibody response against MCV, BKV and JCV was measured by enzyme immunoassay using Virus-Like-Particles. Our results show a similar seroprevalence in cases and controls: 64%/60% for BKV, 83%/82% for MCV, and 87%/83% for JCV. However, among seropositive subjects, higher median seroreactivities were observed in cases compared to controls for BKV (0.84 vs. 0.70, p-value=0.009) and MCV (1.81 vs. 0.65, p-value<0.001). Increased bladder cancer risk was observed for BKV (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.04-1.8) and for MCV (OR=1.5, 95%CI 1.2-1.9), when comparing highest to lowest seroreactivity tertiles. The associations of BKV and MCV with bladder cancer were independent of each other and neither smoking status nor disease stage and grade modified them. Furthermore, no association was observed between seroresponse to JCV and bladder cancer. Therefore, we conclude that BKV and MCV polyomavirus infection could be related to an increased bladder cancer risk.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
669.00 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2014
    • University of Oviedo
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública
      Oviedo, Asturias, Spain
  • 2013
    • Catalan Institute of Oncology
      • Infections and Cancer Unit
      Badalona, Catalonia, Spain
    • Government of Spain
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos III
      • Center National of Environmental Health (CNSA)
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2012–2013
    • Hospital la Magdalena
      Castellón, Valencia, Spain
    • Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP)
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
    • Parc de recerca biomedica de barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
    • University of Murcia
      Murcia, Murcia, Spain
  • 2007–2013
    • CREAL Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005–2013
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Laboratory of Translational Genomics
      • • Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
      Maryland, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas
      • Molecular Pathology Programme
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2006–2012
    • National Institutes of Health
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Branch of Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2011
    • University of Crete
      • Division of Social Medicine
      Réthymnon, Kriti, Greece
  • 2008
    • Hospital General Universitario de Elche
      Elche, Valencia, Spain
  • 2003–2007
    • University Pompeu Fabra
      • • Department of Experimental and Health Sciences
      • • Municipal Institute of Medical Investigation (IMIM)
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain