Adonina Tardón

University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain

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Publications (156)724.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the association of maternal circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] concentration with pregnancy and birth outcomes.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 09/2014; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence from laboratory animal and human studies suggests that air pollution exposure during pregnancy affects cognitive and psychomotor development in childhood.
    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 07/2014; · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least ten distinct cancers to a small region of 63,000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (ASSET) across six distinct cancers in 34,248 cases and 45,036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): five in the TERT gene (region 1: rs7726159, P=2.10x10-39; region 3: rs2853677, P=3.30x10-36 and PConditional=2.36x10-8; region 4: rs2736098, P=3.87x10-12 and PConditional=5.19x10-6, region 5: rs13172201, P=0.041 and PConditional=2.04x10-6; and region 6: rs10069690, P=7.49x10-15 and PConditional=5.35x10-7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (region 2: rs451360; P=1.90x10-18 and PConditional=7.06x10-16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2014; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) has previously shown to alter epigenetic marks.
    Environment International 06/2014; 71C:81-87. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiological cancer studies on shift work have focused on breast cancer while evidence on other tumours is limited. We evaluated colorectal cancer risk in relation to night and rotating shift work and genetic variation, in a population based case-control study in Spain.
    Occupational and environmental medicine. 06/2014; 71 Suppl 1:A5-6.
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    ABSTRACT: Established risk factors for leukaemia do not explain the majority of leukaemia. Previous studies have suggested the importance of occupation in leukaemogenesis. To evaluate associations between job title and leukaemia in the population the MCC-Spain We studied occupational variation of the risk of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
    Occupational and environmental medicine. 06/2014; 71 Suppl 1:A117-8.
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during fetal development can increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. Maternal characteristics and physiological changes during gestation such as gestational weight gain (GWG) may have an influence in the overall burden of POPs in neonates. However, the associations between GWG and POP concentrations are still not well established. We examined the association of GWG with cord serum POPs concentrations after adjusting for pre-pregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI) and other potential determinants of the transfer of POPs into newborns. The GWG values were evaluated after grouping by the reference guidelines of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). We measured levels of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in 325 cord serum samples from a Spanish birth cohort. Multivariable models were used to estimate associations of GWG, pre-pregnancy BMI, and other maternal determinants on cord serum concentrations of POPs. Neonatal concentrations of POPs were inversely associated with GWG after adjustment for age, pre-pregnancy BMI, educational level, and fish consumption. On average, neonates of women with IOM recommended GWG have lower POP concentrations than neonates of mothers with inadequate GWG. The present findings suggest an association between neonatal exposure to POPs and inadequate GWG during pregnancy. Encouraging pregnant women to meet the recommended IOM guidelines for GWG may reduce the accumulation of POPs in newborns.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 05/2014; · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To build a predictive model for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) risk combining both genomic and nongenomic data, 1,127 cases and 1,090 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO study were genotyped using the HumanHap 1M SNP array. After quality control filters, genotypes from 475,290 variants were available. Nongenomic information comprised age, gender, region, and smoking status. Three Bayesian threshold models were implemented including: (1) only genomic information, (2) only nongenomic data, and (3) both sources of information. The three models were applied to the whole population, to only nonsmokers, to male smokers, and to extreme phenotypes to potentiate the UCB genetic component. The area under the ROC curve allowed evaluating the predictive ability of each model in a 10-fold cross-validation scenario. Smoking status showed the highest predictive ability of UCB risk (AUCtest = 0.62). On the other hand, the AUC of all genetic variants was poorer (0.53). When the extreme phenotype approach was applied, the predictive ability of the genomic model improved 15%. This study represents a first attempt to build a predictive model for UCB risk combining both genomic and nongenomic data and applying state-of-the-art statistical approaches. However, the lack of genetic relatedness among individuals, the complexity of UCB etiology, as well as a relatively small statistical power, may explain the low predictive ability for UCB risk. The study confirms the difficulty of predicting complex diseases using genetic data, and suggests the limited translational potential of findings from this type of data into public health interventions.
    Genetic Epidemiology 05/2014; · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The different role of prenatal and postnatal exposure to tobacco smoke in respiratory outcomes in infants has not yet been clearly established. Our objective is to assess the effects of these exposures on the risk of respiratory outcomes during the first year of life of infants from a Spanish multicenter cohort study2506 women were monitored until delivery. 2039 infants made up the final population. The outcomes were the occurrence of: otitis, cough persisting for more than three weeks, lower respiratory tract symptoms (wheezing or chestiness), and lower respiratory tract infections (bronchitis, bronchiolitis or pneumonia). The relationship between prenatal and postnatal exposure and health outcomes was explored using logistic regression analysisMaternal smoking during pregnancy increased the odds for wheezing (OR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.99 - 2.01) and chestiness (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.03 - 2.01). Postnatal exposure from fathers was associated with otitis (OR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.01-1.54). Passive exposure at work of non smoking mothers during pregnancy was related to cough (OR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.05 - 2.51)Conclusions: Exposure to tobacco smoke was related to a higher risk of experiencing respiratory outcomes in young infants. Prenatal exposure was that most clearly associated with the respiratory outcomes analyzedThis article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Indoor Air 05/2014; · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Aberrant global DNA methylation is shown to increase cancer risk. LINE-1 has been proven a measure of global DNA methylation. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between LINE-1 methylation level and bladder cancer risk and to evaluate effect modification by environmental and genetic factors. Methods: Bisulphite-treated leukocyte DNA from 952 cases and 892 hospital controls was used to measure LINE-1 methylation level at four CpG sites by pyrosequencing. Logistic regression model was fitted to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Interactions between LINE-1 methylation levels and environmental and genetic factors were assessed. Results: The risk of bladder cancer followed a nonlinear association with LINE-1 methylation. Compared with subjects in the middle tertile, the adjusted OR for subjects in the lower and the higher tertiles were 1.26 (95% CI 0.99-1.60, P=0.06) and 1.33 (95% CI 1.05-1.69, P=0.02), respectively. This association significantly increased among individuals homozygous for the major allele of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase gene (corrected P-interaction<0.05). Conclusions: The findings from this large-scale study suggest that both low and high levels of global DNA methylation are associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 03/2014; · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prenatal life is the most sensitive stage of human development to environmental pollutants. Early exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. The mechanisms of transference of POPs during pregnancy are still not well understood. The present study is aimed to investigate the transfer of POPs between mother and fetus. The concentrations of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners have been measured in 308 maternal serum samples, their respective umbilical cords and 50 placental tissues from a mother-infant cohort representative of Spanish general population. In general, the adjusted lipid-basis concentrations were higher in maternal serum than in cord serum and placenta. The concentrations of most pollutants between maternal serum and cord serum and between maternal serum and placenta were significantly correlated. These distributions were consistent with a predominant maternal source that transfers the pollutants into the placenta and the fetus. However, this distribution did not correspond to passive diffusion of these compounds between these tissues according to lipid content. The compounds more readily metabolized were higher in newborns, which suggest that differences in metabolic capabilities may be responsible of the observed variations in POP distributions between mother and newborns. Prenatal exposure to 4,4'-DDT and some PBDEs such as BDE 99 and BDE 209 is much higher than it could be anticipated from the composition of maternal serum. POP exposure assessment studies of newborns may overlook the effects of some of these pollutants if they only consider maternal determinations.
    Environment international 01/2014; 65C:107-115. · 6.25 Impact Factor
  • Adonina Tardon
    Medicina Clínica 01/2014; · 1.40 Impact Factor
  • Adonina Tardon
    Medicina Clínica. 01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prenatal life is the most sensitive stage of human development to environmental pollutants. Early exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may increase the risk of adverse health effects during childhood. The mechanisms of transference of POPs during pregnancy are still not well understood. The present study is aimed to investigate the transfer of POPs between mother and fetus. The concentrations of 14 organochlorine pesticides, 7 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 14 polybromodiphenyl ether (PBDEs) congeners have been measured in 308 maternal serum samples, their respective umbilical cords and 50 placental tissues from a mother–infant cohort representative of Spanish general population. In general, the adjusted lipid-basis concentrations were higher in maternal serum than in cord serum and placenta. The concentrations of most pollutants between maternal serum and cord serum and between maternal serum and placenta were significantly correlated. These distributions were consistent with a predominant maternal source that transfers the pollutants into the placenta and the fetus. However, this distribution did not correspond to passive diffusion of these compounds between these tissues according to lipid content. The compounds more readily metabolized were higher in newborns, which suggest that differences in metabolic capabilities may be responsible of the observed variations in POP distributions between mother and newborns. Prenatal exposure to 4,4′-DDT and some PBDEs such as BDE 99 and BDE 209 is much higher than it could be anticipated from the composition of maternal serum. POP exposure assessment studies of newborns may overlook the effects of some of these pollutants if they only consider maternal determinations.
    Environment International. 01/2014; 65:107–115.
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    ABSTRACT: Germline variants in TP63 have been consistently associated with several tumors, including bladder cancer, indicating the importance of TP53 pathway in cancer genetic susceptibility. However, variants in other related genes, including TP53 rs1042522 (Arg72Pro), still present controversial results. We carried out an in depth assessment of associations between common germline variants in the TP53 pathway and bladder cancer risk. We investigated 184 tagSNPs from 18 genes in 1,058 cases and 1,138 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study. Cases were newly-diagnosed bladder cancer patients during 1998-2001. Hospital controls were age-gender, and area matched to cases. SNPs were genotyped in blood DNA using Illumina Golden Gate and TaqMan assays. Cases were subphenotyped according to stage/grade and tumor p53 expression. We applied classical tests to assess individual SNP associations and the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO)-penalized logistic regression analysis to assess multiple SNPs simultaneously. Based on classical analyses, SNPs in BAK1 (1), IGF1R (5), P53AIP1 (1), PMAIP1 (2), SERINPB5 (3), TP63 (3), and TP73 (1) showed significant associations at p-value≤0.05. However, no evidence of association, either with overall risk or with specific disease subtypes, was observed after correction for multiple testing (p-value≥0.8). LASSO selected the SNP rs6567355 in SERPINB5 with 83% of reproducibility. This SNP provided an OR = 1.21, 95%CI 1.05-1.38, p-value = 0.006, and a corrected p-value = 0.5 when controlling for over-estimation. We found no strong evidence that common variants in the TP53 pathway are associated with bladder cancer susceptibility. Our study suggests that it is unlikely that TP53 Arg72Pro is implicated in the UCB in white Europeans. SERPINB5 and TP63 variation deserve further exploration in extended studies.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(5):e89952. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analyzed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case–control studies on lung cancer and the joint effects of occupational carcinogens. For men ever employed as bricklayers we estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for study center, age, lifetime smoking history and employment in occupations with exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens. Among 15,608 cases and 18,531 controls, there were 695 cases and 469 controls who had ever worked as bricklayers (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28–1.68). In studies using population controls the OR was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.32–1.81, 540/349 cases/controls), while it was 1.24 (95% CI: 0.93–1.64, 155/120 cases/controls) in hospital-based studies. There was a clear positive trend with length of employment (p < 0.001). The relative risk was higher for squamous (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.42–1.98, 309 cases) and small cell carcinomas (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.44–2.20, 140 cases), than for adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.95–1.43, 150 cases) (p-homogeneity: 0.0007). ORs were still elevated after additional adjustment for education and in analyses using blue collar workers as referents. This study provided robust evidence of increased lung cancer risk in bricklayers. Although non-causal explanations cannot be completely ruled out, the association is plausible in view of the potential for exposure to several carcinogens, notably crystalline silica and to a lesser extent asbestos.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2014; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) has previously shown to alter epigenetic marks. Objectives In this work we explore whether prenatal exposure to mixtures of xenoestrogens has the potential to alter the placenta epigenome, by studying DNA methylation in retrotransposons as a surrogate of global DNA methylation. Methods The biomarker total effective xenoestrogen burden (TEXB) was measured in 192 placentas from participants in the longitudinal INMA Project. DNA methylation was quantitatively assessed by bisulfite pyrosequencing on 10 different retrotransposons including 3 different long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs), 4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) and 3 human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). Associations were tested using linear mixed-effects regression models and sex interaction was evaluated. Results A significant sex interaction was observed for AluYb8 (p-value for interaction < 0.001, significant at Bonferroni corrected p-value threshold of 0.0025). Boys with the highest TEXB-alpha levels of exposure (third tertile) presented on average a decrease of 0.84% in methylation compared to those in the first tertile (p-value < 0.001), while no significant effects were found in girls (p-value = 0.134). Conclusions Our findings suggest that boys may be more susceptible to the effect of exposure to xenoestrogens during prenatal development, producing shifts in DNA methylation of certain sensitive genomic repetitive sequences in a tissue important for fetal growth and development.
    Environment International. 01/2014; 71:81–87.
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    ABSTRACT: The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985-2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20-30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive.
    American journal of epidemiology 12/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies that have evaluated the association between exposure to gas appliances emissions at home with respiratory health in children obtained heterogeneous and limited results. The aim of this study is to analyze the association between the use of gas cooking at home during pregnancy and respiratory problems in children during their first year of life. In the years 2003 through 2008 pregnant women were enrolled in 4 Spanish areas and visited in different age-points following a common protocol. Outcomes studied (from a questionnaire) were any episode of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), wheezing, persistent cough, chestiness and otitis. The association between exposure to gas cooking at home and respiratory outcomes was assessed using logistic regression and adjusting by confounding variables. Some potential effect modifiers (i.e. smoking, fruit and vegetables consumption) were examined. Among the 2003 children included in the study, a total of 731 (36.6%) had a LRTI episode, 693 (34.6%) experienced wheezing, 302 (15.5%) a persistent cough, 939 (47.4%) chestiness and 620 (31.2%) had an episode of otitis during their first year of life. Gas cookers were present in 45.5% of homes. Exposure to gas cooking in homes was not associated with respiratory outcomes Odds Ratios (OR) were close to 1 and not statistically significant. However, a positive association was found for otitis among infants whose mothers reported low intakes of fruit and vegetables during pregnancy [OR (95%CI) = 1.38 (1.01-1.9)] and also wheezing and chestiness were associated with gas cookers among those children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. In susceptible subjects (those whose mothers smoke and consumed below average fruit and vegetables) we found an association between exposure to gas cooking during pregnancy and risk of wheezing, chestiness and otitis during the first year of life. But more research is needed regarding not only gas cooking and respiratory health but also the possible effect modifier role of diet and tobacco.
    Environmental Health 12/2013; 12(1):100. · 2.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the main sources of and sociodemographic factors associated with second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure, assessed both by questionnaire and by urinary cotinine (UC) levels, in non-smoking pregnant women. We conducted a cross-sectional study in pregnant women from 4 different regions in Spain. A total of 1783 non-smoking pregnant women completed a questionnaire about their previous smoking habit and SHS exposure in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy and provided a urine sample for measuring UC levels. We used logistic regression models to assess the relationship between several sociodemographic variables and some potential sources of SHS exposure. In addition, we analysed the association of several sociodemographic variables and the SHS exposure according to UC levels, using Tobit regression analysis. More than half of women (55.5%) were exposed to SHS in their 3rd trimester of pregnancy. The following variables were associated with SHS exposure: having smoked previously, low educational level, and being primiparous. Data collection after the first law banning smoking in public places was associated with lower risk of SHS exposure in restaurants and at work. UC levels were higher among women exposed to more than one source. Having a partner who smoked at home was the source of SHS with the greatest impact on UC levels, followed by having a partner who smoked but not at home, other people smoking in the household, being exposed during leisure time, at work and at restaurants. The most important source of SHS exposure was exposure at home. Prevention of SHS exposure should be addressed not only with pregnant women but also with their families.
    Science of The Total Environment 11/2013; 470-471C:1189-1196. · 3.26 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
724.72 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2014
    • University of Oviedo
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Medicina Preventiva y Salud Pública
      Oviedo, Asturias, Spain
  • 2013
    • Catalan Institute of Oncology
      • Infections and Cancer Unit
      Badalona, Catalonia, Spain
    • Government of Spain
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos III
      • Center National of Environmental Health (CNSA)
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2012–2013
    • Hospital la Magdalena
      Castellón, Valencia, Spain
    • Centro Superior de Investigación en Salud Pública (CSISP)
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
    • Parc de recerca biomedica de barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
    • University of Murcia
      Murcia, Murcia, Spain
  • 2007–2013
    • CREAL Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2005–2013
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Laboratory of Translational Genomics
      • • Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
      Maryland, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas
      • Molecular Pathology Programme
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2006–2012
    • National Institutes of Health
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Branch of Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2011
    • University of Crete
      • Division of Social Medicine
      Réthymnon, Kriti, Greece
  • 2008
    • Hospital General Universitario de Elche
      Elche, Valencia, Spain
  • 2003–2007
    • University Pompeu Fabra
      • • Department of Experimental and Health Sciences
      • • Municipal Institute of Medical Investigation (IMIM)
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain