Bora Ozturk

Selcuk University, Konya, Konya, Turkey

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Publications (27)38.7 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dentin bond durability of a one-step, fluoride-containing, glass ionomer-based adhesive system, Reactmer Bond (RB), and that of a two-step, fluoride-containing, self-etch adhesive system, Clearfil Protect Bond (CPB). Enamel was removed from the occlusal surfaces of teeth, and flat dentin surfaces were entirely covered with a composite resin following the application of an adhesive material (n=10). After specimens were sectioned into rectangular sticks of 0.87±0.03 mm(2), the sticks were randomly assigned into two accelerated aging time period groups: 1 week or 1 year. Microtensile bond strengths were determined. Bond strength of RB increased significantly after 1 year (1 week=27.80±10.57 MPa versus 1 year=36.93±14.38 MPa) (p<0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference in bond strength between the two time periods for CPB (1 week=51.74±17.8 MPa versus 1 year=56.03±18.85 MPa) (p>0.05). Both fluoride-containing adhesives seemed to demonstrate reliable bonding performance after 1 year of accelerated aging in water.
    Dental Materials Journal 01/2014; 33(1):92-7. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare the conversion degree of six different composite materials (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P60, Spectrum TPH, Pertac II, Clearfil AP-X, and Clearfil Photo Posterior) using three different light sources (blue light-emitting diode [LED], plasma arc curing [PAC], and conventional halogen lamp [QTH]). Composites were placed in a 2 mm thick and 5 mm diameter Teflon molds and light cured from the top using three methods: LED for 40 s, PAC for 10 s, and QTH for 40 s. A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) (n=5). The results were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD test. DC was significantly influenced by two variables, light source and composite (P<.05). QTH revealed significantly higher DC values than LED (P<.05). However, there were no significant differences between DC values of QTH and PAC or between DC values of LED and PAC (P>.05). The highest DC was observed in the Z 250 composite specimens following photopolymerization with QTH (70%). The lowest DC was observed in Clearfil Photo Posterior composite specimens following photo-polymerization with LED (43%). The DC was found to be changing according to both light sources and composite materials used. Conventional light halogen (QTH) from light sources and Filtek Z 250 and Filtek P 60 among composite materials showed the most DC performance.
    European journal of dentistry 01/2013; 7(1):102-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of different cavity preparation techniques on microtensile bond strength (MBS) of two adhesive systems on the caries affected dentin. Methods: Forty extracted human molar teeth that have proximal carious lesion were used in this study. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups according to cavity preparation techniques (Steel Bur (Meisinger) (as control), Er:YAG laser (Fidelis Plus III), Carisolv (CA-Mediteam), and Air Polishing (Prophy-Mate Neo)). Carious lesions were excavated with one of the four techniques. Then, the groups were divided into two subgroups according to adhesive systems (Adper SE Plus and Clearfil S3Bond) (n=5). The adhesive systems were applied to caries affected dentin surfaces. After 24 hours of water storage, restored teeth were serially sectioned into beams with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm2 at the bonded interface and were tested in tension with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by Two-Way ANOVA, Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p<0.05). Results: Cavity preparation techniques, adhesive systems, and their interaction significantly affected the MBS (p<0.05). The Steel Bur (32,47±10,78) and Carisolv (27,02±9,12) showed higher MBS than Air Polishing (19,20±5,59) and Er:YAG laser (19,05±7,08) groups (p<0,05). The Highest values were observed in the Steel Bur + Adper SE Plus group (37.20±11.65) among the preparation techniques + adhesive groups. Conclusions: Generally, in cavity preparation techniques, steel bur and carisolv performed better MBS than Er:YAG laser and Air Polishing. In adhesive systems, Adper SE Plus was better than Clearfil S3Bond. External link. Please review our privacy policy. Keywords: Adhesion, Cariology, Dental materials and Dentin
    09/2012
  • Hb Kara, F Aykent, B Ozturk
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Purpose : The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the color changes of five different restorative materials after exposing these materials to two different home bleaching agents. Methods : This study applied bleaching agents to an ultralow-fusing porcelain, a low-fusing porcelain, two types of heat-pressed glass ceramics, and a ceromer. A total of 24 disc-shaped specimens were fabricated (with a diameter of 10 mm and a thickness of 2 mm) from each material (n=12). The initial color measurements were taken with a spectrophotometer. The first set of specimens were bleached with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) for one hour daily for 10 days. The other set of specimens were bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching gel for eight hours daily for 14 days. Data were analyzed with the one-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis statistical test. The difference in the prebleaching and postbleaching color of each material was considered to be statistically significant at p < 0.05. Results : The study found a statistically significant difference among the color changes of the test groups after exposing them to both bleaching agents (p<0.05). Appreciable color change was observed in the Estenia (ΔE=3.99) specimens that were bleached with the HP, and noticeable color changes were observed in the Estenia (ΔE=1.89) and IPS Empress 2 (ΔE=1.66) groups when they were treated with the CP. Conclusions : Restorations (especially polymer-containing restorative materials) should be protected before any bleaching procedure due to the high risk of color change.
    Operative Dentistry 07/2012; · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effect that different techniques for removing dental caries had on the strength of the microtensile bond to caries-affected human dentine created by three bonding agents. Forty-five human molar teeth containing carious lesions were randomly divided into three groups according to the technique that would be used to remove the caries: a conventional bur, an Er:YAG laser or a chemo-mechanical Carisolv(®) gel (n=15). Next, each of the three removal-technique groups was divided into three subgroups according to the bonding agents that would be used: Clearfil(®) SE Bond, G-Bond(®), or Adper(®) Single Bond 2 (n=5). Three 1mm(2) stick-shaped microtensile specimens from each tooth were prepared with a slow-speed diamond saw sectioning machine fitted with a diamond-rim blade (n=15 specimens). For each removal technique one dentine sample was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. There were statistically significant differences in the resulting tensile strength of the bond among the techniques used to remove the caries and there were also statistically significant differences in the strength of the bond among the adhesive systems used. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system was the most affected by the technique used to remove the caries; of the three techniques tested, the chemo-mechanical removal technique worked best with the two-step self etch adhesive system. The bond strength values of the etch-and-rinse adhesive system were affected by the caries removal techniques used in the present study. However, in the one- and two-step self etch adhesive systems, bond strength values were not affected by the caries removal techniques applied. While a chemo-mechanical caries removal technique, similar to Carisolv(®), may be suggested with self etch adhesive systems, in caries removal techniques with laser, etch-and-rinse systems might be preferred. Caries removal methods may lead to differences in the characteristics of dentine surface. Dentine ultra structure generally affects the bonding of adhesive materials commonly used in restorative dentistry. Whereas etch-and-rinse system, like the ones used in the present study, are affected by these changes, the self etch systems are not affected. Hence, clinicians may opt for caries removal methods and systems appropriate for each patient and practice.
    Journal of dentistry 06/2012; 40(10):793-801. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the extent of microleakage of a single type of composite resin (Clearfil Majesty Posterior, Kuraray, Osaka, Japan) following different preheating procedures in Class V cavities prepared with a diamond bur or Er:YAG (erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. The study randomly divided 72 permanent molar teeth divided into eight groups (n = 9): G1: Diamond bur-unheated composite resin (room temperature-24 ºC); G2: Diamond bur-composite preheated to 37 ºC; G3: Diamond bur-composite preheated to 54 ºC; G4: Diamond bur-composite preheated to 68 ºC; G5: Er:YAG laser-unheated composite resin (room temperature-24 ºC); G6: Er:YAG laser-composite preheated to 37 ºC; G7: Er:YAG laser-composite preheated to 54 ºC; and G8: Er:YAG laser-composite preheated to 68 ºC. The specimens were subjected to a thermal cycling regimen of 5000 cycles between 5 and 55 ºC; then they were immersed in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours. The dyed specimens were sectioned in the buccolingual direction and dye penetration was scored in a blinded manner using a five-point qualitative scale. Microleakage scores were analyzed with the Kruskall-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. There were no statistically significant differences between the microleakages of composite applied to cavities prepared by either the Er:YAG laser or diamond bur (P>.05). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the enamel and dentin in all restorations (P<.001). However, there were no significant differences among the preheated groups (P>.05). For all groups, microleakage values were higher at gingival margins than at occlusal margins. The use of the Er:YAG laser at different preheating procedures did not influence the marginal sealing in Class V composite resin restorations.
    European journal of dentistry. 01/2012; 6(1):87-94.
  • H.B. KARA, F. AYKENT, B. OZTURK
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this invitro study was to determine the color changes of 5 different restorative materials after exposing 2 different bleaching agents. Methods: An ultra low fusing porcelain (Finesse), a low fusing porcelain (Vita VM9), 2 heat-pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress 2 - IPS e.max Press), a ceromer (Estenia) were choosen in this study. Twenty four disc shaped specimens were fabricated (in a diameter of 10 mm and in a thickness of 2 mm) from each material. Two experimental groups including 12 specimens were occured. After the specimens were left in distiled water for 24 hours the initial color measuraments were taken with a spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade Compact). Than first group specimens of all materials were bleached with 10 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Opalescence Treswhite Supreme gel) for 1 hour daily for 10 days. The other group specimens were bleached with 10 % carbamide peroxide bleaching gel (CP) (Opalescence gel) for 8 hours daily for 14 days. After bleaching, color measurements were repeated. Data were analyzed with OneWay ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis statistical test. The statistical meaningful level was accepted as p
    45th Meeting of the Continental European Division of the International Association of Dental Research (CED-IADR) with the Scandinavian Division (NOF) 2011; 09/2011
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments (air abrasion, acid etching, and laser irradiation) on the surface roughness and bond strength of a low fusing ceramic. Thirty-six discs of low fusing ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco) were prepared (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Specimens were divided into three groups (n = 12), and the following treatments were performed: Air abrasion with alumina particles (50 μm), acid etching with 5% HF and Nd:YAG laser irradiation (distance: 1 mm, 100 mJ, 20 Hz, 2 W, and 141.54 J/cm(2)). Following determination of surface roughness (R(a)) by profilometry, specimens were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The luting cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement) was bonded to the ceramic specimens using Teflon tubes. After 24 h of water storage, shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests (α = .05). Two-way ANOVA indicated that surface roughness was significantly affected by surface treatments (p < .001). Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) indicated that the air abrasion group had a significantly higher mean value (p < .05) than the other groups. Shear bond strength was significantly affected by surface treatments (p < .001). Tukey HSD indicated that the air abrasion group had a significantly higher mean value (p < .05) than the other groups. No significant difference was found between the acid-etching and laser-irradiation groups (p > .05). The SEM image of the laser irradiation surface appeared to be relatively smooth as compared to the images of other the groups. Air abrasion of low-fusing porcelain surfaces was effective in improving the bond strength as compared to the acid-etching and laser-irradiation methods.
    Lasers in Medical Science 09/2011; 26(5):599-604. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strengths of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to bleached and non?bleached enamel. Ninety?six extracted maxillary central incisors were divided into two groups of 48 specimens each, bleached group and non?bleached group. After bleaching, teeth were prepared to accommodate veneers of equal thickness. Two ceramic systems, Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2, were used for restoration. Each of the two ceramic groups was luted with Variolink 2 and RelyX veneer cement. Specimens were then subjected to tensile forces. The bond strength values were analysed with two?way analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference tests. Microtensile bond strength significantly reduced after bleaching procedure (p
    Material Research Innovations 01/2011; 15(1):63-65. · 0.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives:The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatments ( Air abraded, Acid etching, Lased) on the surface roughness and bond strength of a low fusing ceramic. Methods:Thirty six discs of low fusing ceramic (Finesse, Ceramco) were prepared (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) according to the manifacturer's instructions. Specimens were divided into 3 groups (n =12), and the following treatments were performed: airborne-particle abraded with alumina particles (50 m), acid etched with 5% HCl and Nd:YAG laser irradiation (distance: 1mm, 100mJ, 20Hz, 2W, and 141.54J/cm2). Following surface roughness (Ra) determination by profilometry, specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Within groups specimens were bonded in to pairs with composite luting cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement). After 48 h of water storage, shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2 way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests ( = 0.05). Results:Two-way ANOVA indicated that surface roughness was significantly affected by surface treatments (P<.001). Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) indicated that the air abraded group had a significantly higher mean (P<.05) than the other groups. Shear bond strength was significantly affected by surface treatments (P<.001). Tukey HSD indicated that the air abraded group had a significantly higher mean (P<.05) than the other groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the acid etching and lased groups (P>.05). Conclusions:Airborne-particle-abrasion of low-fusing porcelain surfaces was effective in improving the bond strength, as compared to the laser etching and acid-etching method.
    IADR General Session 2010; 07/2010
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mineral content of dentin prepared using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser at four different power settings, acid etching, and air abrasion. The study teeth comprised 35 molars which were randomly divided into seven equal groups. The occlusal third of the crowns were cut with a slow-speed diamond saw. The groups were as follows: group A, control group; group B, dentin etched with 35% buffered phosphoric acid for 30 s; group C, dentin abraded at 60 psi with 50-microm aluminium oxide for 1 s; groups D-G, dentin irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 1.50 W (group D), 2.25 W (group E), 3.00 W (group F), and 3.50 W (group G). The levels of Mg, P, Ca, K and Na in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. There were no significant differences between the groups in the levels of Ca, P and Na, and the Ca/P ratio (p>0.05); however, there were significant differences in the levels of K (p<0.001) and Mg (p=0.13). In addition, the levels of Mg in the air abrasion group were higher than in the other groups (p<0.01). Etching with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser system, air abrasion and acid etching did not affect the levels of Ca, P and Na, or the Ca/P ratio, in the dentin surface.
    Lasers in Medical Science 01/2010; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion and Vickers surface hardness of resin cement under a simulated ceramic restoration with 3 different curing units: a conventional halogen unit, a high-intensity halogen unit, and a light-emitting diode system. A conventional halogen curing unit (Hilux 550) (40 s), a high-intensity halogen curing unit used in conventional and ramp mode (Optilux 501) (10 s and 20 s, respectively), and a light-emitting diode system (Elipar FreeLight) (20 s, 40 s) were used in this study. The dual-curing resin cement (Variolink II) was cured under a simulated ceramic restoration (diameter 5 mm, height 2 mm), and the degree of conversion and Vickers surface hardness were measured. For degree of conversion measurement, 10 specimens were prepared for each group. The absorbance peaks were recorded using the diffuse-reflection mode of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. For Vickers surface hardness measurement, 10 specimens were prepared for each group. A load of 200 N was applied for 15 seconds, and 3 evaluations of each of the samples were performed. Degree of conversion achieved with Optilux 501 (20 s) was significantly higher than those of Hilux, Optilux 501 (10 s), Elipar FreeLight (20 s), and Elipar FreeLight (40 s). For Vickers surface hardness measurement, Optilux 501 (20 s) produced the highest surface hardness value. No significant differences were found among the Hilux, Optilux 501 (10 s), Elipar FreeLight (20 s), and Elipar FreeLight (40 s). The high-intensity halogen curing unit used in ramp mode (20 s) produced harder resin cement surfaces than did the conventional halogen curing unit, high-intensity halogen curing unit used in conventional mode (10 s) and light-emitting diode system (20 s, 40 s), when cured through a simulated ceramic restoration.
    Quintessence international 01/2006; 36(10):771-7. · 0.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study determined color changes in a composite cured with various types of curing units after two years. A hybrid (Clearfil AP-X) composite was cured with a conventional halogen, a high intensity halogen, a plasma arc and a light emitting diode unit. The specimens were stored in light-proof boxes after the curing procedure to avoid further exposure to light and stored in 37 degrees C in 100% humidity. Colorimetric values of the specimens immediately after curing and after two years were measured using a colorimeter. The CIE 1976 L*a*b color system was used to determine color differences. Differences from baseline were calculated as deltaE*ab. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (p<0.05). The deltaE*ab values varied significantly, depending on the curing unit used. The specimens cured with a plasma arc curing unit induced significantly higher color changes than any other specimen and the color differences were also visually appreciable by the non-skilled operator (deltaE*ab >2.5). The specimens cured with a high intensity halogen curing unit produced the lowest color change; however, there were no statistically significant differences among the color changes of specimens cured with conventional halogen, high intensity halogen and the light emitting diode unit, and the color changes were not clinically relevant (deltaE*ab <2.5). The results of this study suggest that composite materials undergo measurable changes due to curing unit exposure. The specimens cured with a plasma arc light showed the highest color changes as compared to specimens cured with other curing units.
    Operative Dentistry 01/2005; 30(5):655-60. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age of dentin and enamel on the microtensile bond strengths of a glass-ionomer based, all-in-one, single-step, self-etching adhesive system (Reactmer Bond, RB) and an antibacterial, two-step self-etching primer system (ABF Bond, ABF). Extracted molars from 3 age groups (20 to 25, 35 to 40, and 50 to 55 years) were used. Enamel was removed from the occlusal surfaces of the teeth, and the entire flat surfaces were covered with composite resin (4 mm in height) following application of bonding agents. The bonded specimens were thinly sectioned parallel to the long axis of the tooth into 0.87 +/- 0.03 mm2 rectangular sections, resulting in 6 to 7 enamel specimens and 10 to 15 dentin specimens per tooth. The specimens were subjected to the microtensile test at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed by Univariate ANOVA, Tukey HSD, and regression analysis. The bond strength of ABF to both enamel and dentin was higher than the bond strength of RB. Bond strengths of ABF to dentin were significantly higher than the bond strengths to enamel (p < 0.05). The 35- to 40-year age group of ABF showed the highest bond strength of all. In RB dentin groups, 34% of specimens showed cohesive failure in composite resin material. Bond strength values to enamel were not affected by age of teeth in either bonding system. Dentinal bond strength using ABF changed according to age of the teeth. Age did not affect bond strength values of RB to dental hard tissues. However, the high number of cohesive failures in Reactmer paste indicated low tensile strength of the material.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 01/2005; 7(4):289-95. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro dentine permeability evaluation of 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-based desensitizing products using split-chamber model following in vivo application in the dogs for three experimental time periods of 1 week, 1 month and 3 months. Buccal enamel of upper and lower canines of nine young dogs was removed and flat dentinal surface was obtained using a water-cooled diamond bur. The dentinal surface divided into four quarters, three experimental and a control. Health-Dent and Gluma Desensitizing agent and Single bond were applied to respective quarters of one tooth, according to manufacturers' instructions. The last quarters were left as control without any applications. For the each experimental period, 10 dentine samples from each group including control were used to measure the hydraulic conductance values. The dentine discs were placed pulp-side down in a split-chamber device in which the plastic spacers containing the rubber 0 rings have a surface area of 1 mm(2) and permeability was measured by fluid filtration. The data were expressed as hydraulic conductance (Lp). Differences in dentine permeability obtained for the desensitizing agents against the control were tested for statistical significance using Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni-adjusted Mann-Whitney U-tests. Differences in permeability in three time periods for each desensitizing agent were analysed using Friedman's anova and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. All desensitizing applications caused decreased Lp values compared with the control Lp value at the end of 1 week. In the 1-month samples, between the Lp values of Single bond and control, no statistical difference was found (P > 0.05). At the end of the 3-month period, the Gluma Desensitizing agent had the lowest the Lp value (P < 0.05). The result of this study is that the topical application of desensitizing agents led to decrease in dentine permeability in the dog model. The Gluma Desensitizing agent provide the more lasting tubule-occluding effect than the other material tested in this model.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 01/2005; 32(1):34-8. · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the dentin bond strength of directly and indirectly inserted composite restorations. Twenty extracted human mandibular molars were prepared to form a flat occlusal dentin surface using an Isomet saw under water. Five-mm-thick composite restorations (Filtek Z 250 and Clearfil AP-X) were placed on the dentin surfaces by direct or indirect techniques. The direct restorations were bonded with Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond bonding agents. Indirect restorations were cemented with two composite luting cements (3M Opal Luting Cement and Panavia F). All restorative procedures were applied under simulated pulpal pressure (15 cm H2O). Each tooth was then vertically sectioned with an Isomet saw through the composite buildups and the dentin. Thus, for microtensile testing, 0.65 x 0.65 mm specimens were obtained from pulpal and remote dentin regions. The results were analyzed according to the regional dentinal surfaces (pulpal and remote dentin). For statistical analyses, two-way ANOVA and Duncan post-hoc tests were used (p < 0.05). Direct application of Clearfil AP-X showed that tensile bond strengths were higher than those obtained for directly and indirectly applied Filtek Z 250 and indirectly applied Clearfil AP-X. No significant difference in tensile bond strengths was demonstrated between pulpal and remote dentin (p > 0.05). It is concluded that the bond strengths of resin luting cements to dentin need further improvement.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 01/2005; 7(3):197-202. · 0.91 Impact Factor
  • A N Ozturk, B Ozturk, F Aykent
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    ABSTRACT: Microleakage between the restorative materials and the cavity walls of teeth remains a problem. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage around Class V ceramic inlay restoration using three different cementation techniques. Class V preparations were made on the buccal surfaces of 45 freshly extracted premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 15. In the first group, dentine bonding agent (DBA) (Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) was applied immediately after the tooth preparation (D-DBA). In the second group, DBA was applied to the prepared cavities while luting ceramic inlays (I-DBA). In the third group, DBA was not applied at either stage (No-DBA). Impressions were made and ceramic inlays (Ceramco II) fabricated and cemented in the Class V cavities. The restorations were stored in water at room temperature for 24 h. All restorations were thermocycled and then subjected to a dye penetration test. After sectioning, leakage at cavity/restoration interface was scored. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon's signed tests. Results showed no significant difference among three different cementation techniques (P > 0.05). Microleakage at the dentine margins was greater than that at the enamel margins (P < 0.05).
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 12/2004; 31(12):1192-6. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Nilgun Ozturk, Zafer Sari, Bora Ozturk
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    ABSTRACT: This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary approach for the coordinated treatment of a patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta and malocclusion. The patient's functional and esthetic expectations were successfully met with interdisciplinary treatments, including orthodontics, porcelain laminate veneers, metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures, and direct composite restorations.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 09/2004; 92(2):112-5. · 1.72 Impact Factor
  • Bora Ozturk, Füsun Ozer
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 5% NaOCl on bond strengths of four bonding systems-Clearfil SE Bond, Prompt L-Pop, Prime&Bond NT, and Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus-to pulp chamber mesial walls. Forty mandibular third molar teeth were used in the study. The pulp chambers of the first 20 teeth were restored with bonding agents and composite resins after 5% NaOCl irrigation, and the remaining teeth were restored without 5% NaOCl treatment. Each bonding group had five teeth. Three rectangular thin sticks (1+/-0.03 mm) were obtained from the mesial wall of restored pulp chambers by horizontal sectioning. In general, NaOCl application decreased the bond strength values of the bonding agents. Both Clearfil SE Bond and Prompt L-Pop without NaOCL showed higher bond strength values than the other bonding groups. In NaOCl-applied groups, Clearfil SE Bond had the highest bond strength. It can be concluded that self-etching bonding systems are more successful than the other systems in bonding to pulp chamber dentinal wall and that NaOCl reduces bond strength.
    Journal of Endodontics 06/2004; 30(5):362-5. · 2.93 Impact Factor
  • B Ozturk, F Ozer, S Belli
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    ABSTRACT: To compare in vitro the sealing properties of five different dentine adhesive materials (Prime&Bond NT (PBNT); Prompt L-Pop (PLP); Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB); Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus (SMPP); EBS-Multi (EBSM)) inside the pulp chamber. Seventy-five recently extracted human molar teeth were used. The roof of the pulp chambers and roots were removed under water cooling. Pulp tissue was removed, and the canal orifices were sealed. The pulp chambers were then treated with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 1 min. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of 15 teeth each. Adhesive systems were applied to the pulp chamber walls according to the manufacturers' instructions. The samples were connected to Plexiglass plates, and a fluid filtration method was used for quantitative evaluation of leakage. Measurements of fluid movement were made at 2-min intervals for 8 min. The quality of seal of each specimen was measured immediately, after 24 h, 1 week and 1 month. The data were statistically analysed by repeated-measurements multivariate anova, Friedman test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Kruskal-Wallis of one-way anova and Mann-Whitney U-tests. The pulp chamber wall with and without NaOCl and resin-dentine interfaces of specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The leakage values of the materials were significantly different at different measurement periods. In all groups, leakage values decreased with time (P < 0.05). PBNT and PLP had the least leakage during immediate measurements (P < 0.05). After 1 month, leakage of all adhesive systems was not significantly different (P < 0.05). SEM observation of pulp chamber walls demonstrated that the irregular dentine surface without smear layer was present in the nontreated group. However, NaOCl application removed the collagen fibrils leaving the dentine surface smooth. At resin-dentine interfaces of specimens, no hybridization zone was observed. None of the materials had created a perfect seal to the pulp chamber walls. PBNT and PLP had better sealing over the short term, but over the long term, there were no differences between the materials.
    International Endodontic Journal 06/2004; 37(5):297-306. · 2.05 Impact Factor