Shu-Hui Hsu

Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan, Taiwan

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Publications (7)19.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The authors studied the bioimaging and delivery of drug-entrapped, nanostructured lipid carriers with quantum dots (QDs), called QDNLCs, for integrating imaging and therapy. Materials & methods: Nanostructured lipid carriers consisting of QDs, including lipophilic QDs, carboxyl-function QDs or polyethylene glycol QDs were prepared. Application of the nanocarriers was evaluated by cytotoxicity, cell migration, cellular uptake, in vivo real-time tumor monitoring and drug accumulation in tumors. Results: All QDNLCs exhibited a size of 245 nm with camptothecin encapsulation of >99%. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles against melanoma cells was superior to that of free camptothecin. Carboxylic acid-conjugated QDNLCs (C-QDNLCs) showed the highest cell internalization and in vivo fluorescence labeling compared with the other carriers. Real-time bioimaging demonstrated that C-QDNLCs maintained signaling in tumors for at least 24 h. The camptothecin accumulation in melanomas increased by 6.4-fold after incorporation into C-QDNLCs. Conclusion: For the first time, nanostructured lipid carriers were coordinated with QDs and an anticancer drug to provide efficient tumor imaging and drug delivery. Original submitted 1 May 2012; Revised submitted 30 August 2012.
    Nanomedicine 02/2013; · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effects of lipid colloid systems on skin permeation of two antipsoriatic drugs, calcipotriol and methotrexate. Colloidal systems made of Precirol (solid lipid nanoparticles, SLN), Precirol+squalene (nanostructured lipid carriers, NLC), and squalene (lipid emulsions, LE) as the lipid core material were prepared. Calcipotriol was encapsulated in the inner phase of these carriers due to its high lipophilicity. The hydrophilic methotrexate resided in the aqueous phase of the systems. Particle sizes of SLN, NLC, and LE were 303, 192, and 212 nm, respectively. LE showed a lower negative zeta potential (-20 mV) compared to SLN and NLC (-30 mV). In vitro skin permeation was measured with a Franz assembly. The results showed that lipid colloids increased calcipotriol permeation via nude mouse skin by 2.6∼3.2-fold over the aqueous control. Application of lipid colloids enhanced methotrexate penetration by 4.5∼10.8-fold. Drug permeation was affected by the composition of the inner phases. The permeation of both drugs generally showed a trend of NLC > LE > SLN. The mechanisms of the permeation enhancement by nanoparticles were elucidated using various barriers against drug permeation, including delipidized skin, hairy mouse skin, and cellulose membranes. We determined that the release rate, partitioning ability to the skin, and enhancer effect were major factors enhancing drug permeation. Occlusiveness and follicular pathways were less important for calcipotriol and methotrexate delivery. The in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopic profiles confirmed the importance of the partitioning process for lipophilic drugs. The in vivo examination of transepidermal water loss demonstrated the maintenance of skin integrity after a 24-h application of lipid colloid systems.
    Current Nanoscience 03/2011; 7(2):200-209. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical application of apomorphine, a dopamine receptor agonist for treating Parkinson's disease, is limited by its instability and the need for frequent injections. In the present work, apomorphine was encapsulated within liposomes to protect it from degradation and enhance the permeability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Stearylamine was used to produce a positive surface charge for the liposomes. The liposomal systems with different compositions were characterized by the mean size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation percentage, stability, and in vitro release characteristics. PEGylated liposomes and liposomes incorporating Brij 78 showed a size of 130~160 nm. When Tween 80 was added to the liposomes, the vesicle size increased to > 260 nm. Apomorphine was successfully entrapped by liposomes with an encapsulation percentage of > 70%, with the systems containing Brij 78 showing the highest level of 99%. The loading of apomorphine into liposomes resulted in slower release behavior compared to the drug in an aqueous solution. In comparison to free drug, apomorphine in PEGylated liposomes exhibited greater stability in plasma. The in vivo brain uptake of PEGylated liposomes after an intravenous bolus injection into rats was monitored by in vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging for 1 h. The results showed that the uptake of PEGylated liposomes into the brain was rapid and prolonged. PEGylated liposomes may offer a promising strategy for targeting apomorphine to the brain. This opens up new opportunities for treating Parkinson's disease.
    Current Nanoscience 03/2011; 7(2):191-199. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.
    Nanotechnology 10/2010; 21(40):405101. · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pluronic F127 (PF127) is a copolymer which forms thermosensitive hydrogels. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was grafted to PF127 to form a new hydrogel matrix (HP) for delivery of cisplatin and carboplatin. The physicochemical properties and drug delivery of the graft were examined in this study. HP system (20% HP copolymer in water) exhibited a similar sol-gel transition temperature (28.3 degrees C) as PF127 system (20% PF127 copolymer in water) but with a shorter gelling process. A stronger structure was obtained by HP system according to scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images and viscosity kinetics. In vitro release test showed the sustained-release characteristics of hydrogels entrapped with cisplatin and carboplatin. The drug release rate from HP hydrogel was slower than that from PF127 hydrogel. The reduction of drug release by HP system as compared to the control solution was more significant for cisplatin than for carboplatin. Such a thermosensitive hydrogel may be advantageous as an injectable therapeutic formulation for anticancer treatment.
    CHEMICAL & PHARMACEUTICAL BULLETIN 06/2009; 57(5):453-8. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of Pluronic F127 (PF) hydrogels incorporating liposomes and/or grafted with alginate (AP) for the parenteral delivery of cisplatin. The physicochemical properties such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarity and sol-gel transition temperature, as well as in vitro drug release of developed hydrogels were examined. The sol-gel temperature of PF, PF with liposomes and AP was 26.4, 19.7 and 26.6 degrees C, respectively. A hydrogel with stronger strength was obtained by alginate coupling (AP) according to SEM images and viscosity kinetics as compared to PF. Both liposomes and hydrogels could sustain the release of cisplatin to a certain level. The drug release from the vehicles decreased in the order of PF > liposomes > or = AP > or = PF/liposomes > AP/liposomes. The burst release effect of cisplatin was inhibited when using the AP/liposomes composite system as the vehicle. Formulations were administered intratumorally in melanoma-bearing mice. The respective liposomes or hydrogels did not increase cisplatin accumulation in melanomas compared to the control (aqueous solution). PF/liposomes and AP/liposomes, respectively, increased cisplatin deposition by 2.5- and 4.4-fold. To our best of knowledge, the present work is the first report to investigate the drug delivery from PF-alginate conjugates.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2009; 20(7-8):1031-47. · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To improve the drug absorption into and across the skin, fatty acids extracted from Botryococcus braunii were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo techniques with Wistar rats as the animal model. Palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2), and linolenic acid (C18:3) were the major components in the B. braunii extract. Topical delivery of flurbiprofen was significantly enhanced after pretreatment with 3% B. braunii extract for 30min in an in vitro Franz cell and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. Pure unsaturated fatty acids were more-effective enhancers than the B. braunii extract. However, a greater irritant potential was also observed with those fatty acids than with the B. braunii extract according to the skin tolerance study as determined by transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Both human keratinocytes and skin fibroblasts showed a 1.5-2-fold increase in prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) release as compared to the control. The findings in this study indicate that the fatty acids in B. braunii may be useful enhancers for flurbiprofen delivery via the skin.
    International Journal of Pharmaceutics 06/2004; 276(1-2):163-73. · 3.99 Impact Factor