Fabíola Souza Fiaccadori

Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goianá, Goiás, Brazil

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Publications (26)29.6 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Arboviruses are transmitted by hematophagous arthropod vectors. They are maintained in nature through cycles involving vectors, hosts and their reservoirs, such as vertebrates, and are thus present in the wild environment. In Goiânia, an outbreak of yellow fever in 2007/2008, with records of epidemics, infections and death in the population of non-human primates (NHP's) urban parks in the township occurred. In this context, the present study aimed to carry one sero-epidemiological research on NHP's the city of Goiania. The study Were involved all species present in NHP Screening Center for Wild Animals of the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources - Regional Goiânia (CETAS-IBAMA), Thus, blood samples were collected by femoral venipuncture, or brachial vein from 24 animals. After processing and storage, the samples were sent to LACEN-GO for forwarding to the Instituto Evandro Chagas - IEC. The samples were subjected to reactions of the Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI) using antigens from 19 different arboviruses: Eastern Equine Encephalitis; Western equine encephalitis; Mayaro; Mucambo; Guaroa; Maguari; Tacaiuma; Yellow Fever; islanders; Icoaraci; Utinga; Sao Luis; Cacipacore; Bussuquara; Rocio; Belem; Caraparu; Oropuche; Catu and Dengue virus (DEN-1-4). NHP's species investigated, only the species Cebus libidinosus, Alouatta caraya and Callithrix penicillata were positive by HI. From the total samples, five (20.8%) were positive for one or more of the following viruses: Bussuquara (n = 3), Mayaro (n = 1), Cacipacore (n = 2), Oropouche (n = 3) and Dengue (DEN-2) (n = 2). Noteworthy is the fact that one of the animals was positive for specific antibody Oropouche Virus (VORO), featuring an animal not checked out the urban region and origin of Goiânia, which may suggest the existence of this movement as arboviruses epizootic promoted by a competent vector for the transmission of the virus. This is the first investigation of arboviruses in NHP in the region, and the record of positivity for antibodies against VORO in Goiás state becomes relevant in the context of public health
    XXV Brazilian Congress of Virology & IX Mercosur Meeting of Virology, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Gastroenteric viruses, such as rotavirus A (RVA), human adenovirus (HAdV), human calicivirus (norovirus and sapovirus), human astrovirus (HAstV), are important acute gastroenteritis agents. These agents affect mainly children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Outbreaks of AGE are common in semiclosed environments, such as hospitals, schools and daycare centers; however, asymptomatic viral excretion has been reported by children and immunocompromised individuals. The main objective of this study was to screen fecal samples (previously tested and negative for norovirus and sapovirus genogroups I and II by RTPCR) obtained from children less than five years of age, for RVA, HAdV and HAstV detection. Sample collection took place in a day-care center in Goiânia, Goiás, from October 2009 to September 2011. For RVA and HAdV screening, all samples were tested by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (RIDASCREEN Rotavirus/ Adenovirus – R-Biopharm); samples were further tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for RVA-genome detection. For HAstVs screening, an RTPCR reaction was performed, using primers targeting the ORF2 region. All positive samples were submitted to molecular assays for characterization. From all 42 children, 10 (23.81%), between two and three years old, were positive for one of the viral agents. From those, two (4.7%) were positive for RVA, by both methodologies, and characterized by RT-PCR (targeting the VP7 and VP4 genes) as G2/Pnon-typable. Three (7.14%) were positive for HAdV and characterized, by PCR/NestedPCR followed by genomic sequencing of a partial region of the hexon, as species F (serotypes 40/41). Five (11.9%) were positive for HAstV, and characterized as serotype 1. Data reveal the occurrence of asymptomatic viral excretion by the children in the day-care environment constituting a potential risk for viral dissemination and the occurrence of outbreaks.
    XXV Brazilian Congress of Virology & IX Mercosur Meeting of Virology, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Gastroenteric viruses, such as rotavirus A (RVA), human adenovirus (HAdV), human calicivirus (norovirus and sapovirus), human astrovirus (HAstV), are important acute gastroenteritis agents. These agents affect mainly children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Outbreaks of AGE are common in semiclosed environments, such as hospitals, schools and daycare centers; however, asymptomatic viral excretion has been reported by children and immunocompromised individuals. The main objective of this study was to screen fecal samples (previously tested and negative for norovirus and sapovirus genogroups I and II by RTPCR) obtained from children less than five years of age, for RVA, HAdV and HAstV detection. Sample collection took place in a day-care center in Goiânia, Goiás, from October 2009 to September 2011. For RVA and HAdV screening, all samples were tested by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (RIDASCREEN Rotavirus/ Adenovirus – R-Biopharm); samples were further tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for RVA-genome detection. For HAstVs screening, an RTPCR reaction was performed, using primers targeting the ORF2 region. All positive samples were submitted to molecular assays for characterization. From all 42 children, 10 (23.81%), between two and three years old, were positive for one of the viral agents. From those, two (4.7%) were positive for RVA, by both methodologies, and characterized by RT-PCR (targeting the VP7 and VP4 genes) as G2/Pnon-typable. Three (7.14%) were positive for HAdV and characterized, by PCR/NestedPCR followed by genomic sequencing of a partial region of the hexon, as species F (serotypes 40/41). Five (11.9%) were positive for HAstV, and characterized as serotype 1. Data reveal the occurrence of asymptomatic viral excretion by the children in the day-care environment constituting a potential risk for viral dissemination and the occurrence of outbreaks
    XXV Brazilian Congress of Virology & IX Mercosur Meeting of Virology, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Gastroenteric viruses, such as rotavirus A (RVA), human adenovirus (HAdV), human calicivirus (norovirus and sapovirus), human astrovirus (HAstV), are important acute gastroenteritis agents. These agents affect mainly children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Outbreaks of AGE are common in semiclosed environments, such as hospitals, schools and daycare centers; however, asymptomatic viral excretion has been reported by children and immunocompromised individuals. The main objective of this study was to screen fecal samples (previously tested and negative for norovirus and sapovirus genogroups I and II by RTPCR) obtained from children less than five years of age, for RVA, HAdV and HAstV detection. Sample collection took place in a day-care center in Goiânia, Goiás, from October 2009 to September 2011. For RVA and HAdV screening, all samples were tested by a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (RIDASCREEN Rotavirus/ Adenovirus – R-Biopharm); samples were further tested by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for RVA-genome detection. For HAstVs screening, an RTPCR reaction was performed, using primers targeting the ORF2 region. All positive samples were submitted to molecular assays for characterization. From all 42 children, 10 (23.81%), between two and three years old, were positive for one of the viral agents. From those, two (4.7%) were positive for RVA, by both methodologies, and characterized by RT-PCR (targeting the VP7 and VP4 genes) as G2/Pnon-typable. Three (7.14%) were positive for HAdV and characterized, by PCR/NestedPCR followed by genomic sequencing of a partial region of the hexon, as species F (serotypes 40/41). Five (11.9%) were positive for HAstV, and characterized as serotype 1. Data reveal the occurrence of asymptomatic viral excretion by the children in the day-care environment constituting a potential risk for viral dissemination and the occurrence of outbreaks.
    XXV Brazilian Congress of Virology & IX Mercosur Meeting of Virology, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Human caliciviruses (Norovirus and Sapovirus) are important acute gastroenteritis agents. The Norovirus (NoV) disease is usually self-limited; however, prolonged viral excretion and complications have been reported, mainly in immunosuppressed individuals.
    Journal of clinical virology: the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology 08/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.jcv.2014.08.004 · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Caliciviruses (Norovirus and Sapovirus) are important causes of acute gastroenteritis, with Norovirus (NoV) considered the leading cause of epidemic non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis; however, molecular and epidemiological data of the circulating Calicivirus (CV) strains among day-care children are still considered scarce. The role of asymptomatic CV excretion on viral transmission also remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to monitor the occurrence of NoV and Sapovirus (SaV) in a day-care center and to describe the molecular epidemiology of the circulating strains. Genomic sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the capsid region were carried out in CV positive samples obtained from children younger than 5 years, with or without diarrhea, between October 2009 and October 2011. A total of 539 fecal samples were screened for CV. Forty-three (8%) were positive for NoV and 25 (4.6%) for SaV. Surprisingly, positivity rates for CV were significant in asymptomatic children, and virus circulation was detected in every month of the study. Great genomic diversity of CV was observed, and the circulating NoV strains were: GII.6, GII.2, GII.1, GI.7, GII.4, and GI.1. The SaV genotypes GI.1 and GI.3 were also detected. Five CV outbreaks caused by distinct viral strains were documented. This study provides an insight on the genetic diversity of CV in a day-care in Central West Brazil, highlighting the probable role of asymptomatic viral excretion and the significance of semi-closed settings in the dissemination of these agents. J. Med. Virol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Medical Virology 10/2013; DOI:10.1002/jmv.23791 · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the positivity rate of human bocavirus (HBoV) 1 and 3 among children who presented with acute gastroenteritis symptoms during the period of 1994-2004 in the Central-West Region of Brazil, 762 faecal samples were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of HBoV DNA. Primers for a segment of the non-structural viral protein 1 (NS1) gene of HBoV-1 and HBoV-3 were used. Twelve HBoV-positive samples were further characterised via genomic sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Of the samples tested, 5.8% (n = 44) were positive for HBoV-1 or HBoV-3 and co-infection was observed in 14 (31.8%) of the 44 HBoV-positive samples. Nine of the 14 samples were also positive for Rotavirus A and five were positive for Aichi virus. The genomic sequencing of the NS1 partial sequence of 12 HBoV-samples showed that 11 samples were characterised as HBoV-1 and that one was characterised as HBoV-3. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the HBoV-1 samples had a high sequence homology to others previously identified in China, Sweden and Brazil. This is the first study conducted in the Central-West Region of Brazil to detect HBoV-1 and HBoV-3 in faecal samples from children with acute gastroenteritis. Further studies are required to define the role of HBoVs as aetiological agents of gastroenteritis.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 09/2012; 107(6):800-4. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762012000600015 · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The epidemiological features of rotavirus A (RVA) infection differ between children from developing and developed countries which could result in differences in vaccine efficacy around the world. To evaluate the impact of Rotarix™ on RVA prevalence, we monitored RVA genotypes circulating in Goiânia by monitoring virus in faecal samples from children that had or had not been previously vaccinated. From February-November of 2008, 220 faecal samples were collected from children in seven day-care centres. RVA detection was performed by two methodologies and the results were confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. From the 220 samples, eight were RVA-positive (3.6%) and five were from children that had received either one or two doses of the vaccine. All positive samples were collected from children with diarrhoea during August and September. Genotyping of the RVA characterised five of the viral samples as genotype G2P[4] and one as G8P[4], suggesting that G2P[4] was the predominant circulating genotype in Goiânia during the study. The fact that vaccinated children were also infected by RVA suggests that the vaccine does not fully protect against infection by the G2[P4] RVA genotype.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 06/2011; 106(4):499-501. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762011000400018 · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The adenoviruses are frequently associated with sporadic gastroenteritis outbreaks in different parts of the world. This study aimed at the molecular characterization of human adenoviruses (HAdV) species and serotypes, in fecal samples from children, by multiplex-PCR and by PCR-RFLP, respectively, followed by genomic sequencing. Of 39 adenovirus-positive samples, 30 (76.9%) were classified as species F, six (15.4%) as species C, and two (5.1%) as species A, and one (2.6%) had a mixed F/C pattern. The serotyping showed that 14 (41.2%) were HAdV-41, 15 (44.1%) were HAdV-40, five (14.7%) were HAdV-5, and five samples could not be serotyped. This is the first study to molecularly characterize HAdV in the Central West region of Brazil, and the results highlight the circulation of the HAdV-5 among children with acute gastroenteritis in this region.
    Archives of Virology 10/2010; 155(10):1693-6. DOI:10.1007/s00705-010-0748-3 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This was a prospective study that included women seen in the obstetrics and gynecology sector of Hospital das Clínicas, Federal University of Goiás, in Goiânia, State of Goiás, with the aim of detecting rotaviruses, adenoviruses, caliciviruses and astroviruses. Eighty-four women participated in the study and from these, 314 fecal samples were collected. Out of all of the women, 29 were seropositive for HIV and 55 were seronegative, and 45 and 39 were pregnant and non-pregnant, respectively. Fecal samples were collected from each woman once every two months over the period from July 2006 to June 2007, and they were screened for rotaviruses by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoenzymatic assays, for caliciviruses and astroviruses by means of RT-PCR and for adenovirus by means of immunoenzymatic assays. The astroviruses were genotyped using nested PCR. Among the 84 patients, 19 (22.6%) were positive for either calicivirus (14/19) or astrovirus (6/19), while one women was positive for both viruses in fecal samples collected on different occasions. Most of the positive samples were collected during the months of July and August (astrovirus) and September and October (calicivirus). None of the samples analyzed was positive for rotavirus or adenovirus. Gastroenteric viruses were detected in 13/19 (68.4%) of the pregnant women, whether HIV-seropositive or not. The results from the present study showed that neither pregnancy nor HIV-seropositive status among the women increased the risk of infection by any of the gastroenteric viruses studied. This study presents data on gastroenteric virus detection among pregnant and/or HIV-positive women.
    Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical 01/2010; 43(3):240-3. DOI:10.1590/S0037-86822010000300005 · 0.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is a public health problem worldwide and the virus has been classified into six genotypes. In Brazil, the only genotype that has been found is genotype I, predominately from subgenotype IA. Here, the HAV genotypes were analyzed of 18 isolates circulating between 1996-2001 in Goiânia, state of Goiás, Brazil. Viral RNA was extracted from 18 serum samples and amplified (RT-PCR/nested-PCR), followed by the genomic sequencing of the VP1/2A junction region of the HAV genome. Sequences of 168 nucleotides were compared and analyzed using the BLAST N, Clustal X and PAUP v. 4.10b programs. All samples were classified as genotype I, with 10 belonging to subgenotype IA and eight to subgenotype IB. The subgenotype IA isolates showed greater diversity than the subgenotype IB isolates at the nucleotide level. Elevated identity values were found between isolates obtained in this study and those from other regions of the world, including Brazil, highlighting the high conservation among different isolates of this virus. However, changes in the HAV subgenotype circulation could also be observed during the evaluated period.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 01/2009; 103(8):831-5. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We analyzed fecal samples from hospitalized children up to three years of age with acute gastroenteritis at Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, from May 2000-January 2004. Astrovirus and calicivirus were detected by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction and adenovirus was detected using the Rotavirus and Adenovirus combined immunoenzyme assay. Astrovirus, adenovirus and calicivirus were detected at rates of 3.1%, 3.6% and 7.6%, respectively. These results re-emphasize the need for the establishment of regional vigilance systems to evaluate the impact of enteric viruses on viral gastroenteritis.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 12/2008; 103(7):741-4. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762008000700020 · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are the main causing agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide, having a great impact on childhood mortality in developing countries. The objective of this study was to identify RVA-positive fecal samples with mixed P genotypes by hemi-nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), followed by sequencing confirmation. Our results showed that, from the 81 RVA-positive samples, 25 were positive for more than one P genotype by hemi-nested RT-PCR. Of these 25 samples, 12 (48%) had their mixed P genotypes confirmed by sequencing and, from these, 10 were identified as P[6]P[8], one as P[4]P[6], and one as P[4]P[6]P[8]. Our results confirm the occurrence of RVA mixed infections among children in Brazil and reinforce the importance of the constant monitoring of RVA circulating strains for the efficacy of control/prevention against these agents.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 11/2008; 27(11):1065-9. DOI:10.1007/s10096-008-0542-2 · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Group A rotaviruses are the main cause of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. The intermediate capsid protein VP6 encoded by segment 6 of the dsRNA genome is the major structural component of the virus and it is highly antigenic and immunogenic. VP6 is responsible for group and subgroup (SG) specificities, allowing classification of group A rotavirus into SG I, SG II, SG I + II, and SG non-I-non-II. VP6-encoding gene of 154 group A human rotavirus samples of different G and P genotypes recovered from children in three cities of Central West region of Brazil was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Two distinct genetic groups could be recognized: VP6 genogroups I and II. Sequences analysis also revealed that all samples identified as VP6 genogroup I were associated with NSP4 genotype A, whereas samples identified as VP6 genogroup II were associated with NSP4 genotype B. This is the first study in Central West region regarding genetic variability of the VP6 gene. Further molecular surveillance of rotavirus strains is needed to understand better the occurrence of VP6 gene diversity in Brazil and the significance of VP6 for the control and prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis.
    Journal of Medical Virology 10/2008; 80(11):2034-9. DOI:10.1002/jmv.21306 · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4), encoded by group A rotavirus genome segment 10, is a multifunctional protein and the first recognized virus-encoded enterotoxin. The NSP4 gene has been sequenced, and five distinct genetic groups have been described: genotypes A-E. NSP4 genotypes A, B, and C have been detected in humans. In this study, the NSP4-encoding gene of human rotavirus strains of different G and P genotypes collected from children between 1987 and 2003 in three cities of West Central region of Brazil was characterized. NSP4 gene of 153 rotavirus-positive fecal samples was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced. For phylogenetic analysis, NSP4 nucleotide sequences of these samples were compared to nucleotide sequences of reference strains available in GenBank. Two distinct NSP4 genotypes could be identified: 141 (92.2%) sequences clustered with NSP4 genotype B, and 12 sequences (7.8%) clustered with NSP4 genotype A. These results reinforce that further investigations are needed to assess the validity of NSP4 as a suitable target for epidemiologic surveillance of rotavirus infections and vaccine development.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 06/2008; 103(3):288-94. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762008000300011 · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • Fabíola Souza Fiaccadori, Maristela Pereira, Alexandre Siqueira, Guedes Coelho
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to describe the circulation of caliciviruses in the West Central region of Brazil and its correlation with children's gender and age, as well as with the year and months of the sample collection. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the human calicivirus genome in 1006 fecal samples that were collected in Goiânia (n = 696) and Brasília (n = 310). Viral RNA was detected in 8.6% of the samples. No significant difference in viral prevalence was found regarding gender, age or year of the sample. However, it was observed that in Goiânia, there is a higher incidence of caliciviruses from September to March. The analysis employing three primer pairs demonstrated that the Ni/E3 or JV12/13 primer pairs, which detect norovirus (NoV), detected 41 positive samples while the 289/290 primer pair, which detects NoV or sapovirus, detected the remaining 46 samples. Calicivirus circulates in the West Central region of Brazil and for better detection of this virus it is important to use more than one primer pair. Also, we conclude that the seasonality presented by this virus is related to higher humidity in the period.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 12/2006; 101(7):721-4. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762006000700003 · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, a total of 865 serum samples were collected between 1995 and 2002 from individuals living in Goiânia, Central Brazil, and clinically suspected of hepatitis. After exclusion of 162 samples which were positive for hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, 703 samples were tested for anti-hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) IgM antibodies by enzyme immunoassay. In addition, 588 of these samples and 22 fecal samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-nested PCR for HAV RNA detection, with positivity indices of 13.1% (77/588) and 54.5% (12/22), respectively. A similar index of viral RNA detection in anti-HAV-IgM positive or negative samples was observed in serum samples. HAV infection is a public health problem worldwide and this study underscores the extent of HAV circulation in our region.
    Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 07/2006; 101(4):423-6. DOI:10.1590/S0074-02762006000400013 · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Were analyzed 648 serum samples from laboratory staff in Goiânia, Goiás aiming detection of three serological markers of HBV: HBsAg, anti-HBsAg and anti-HBcAg. The HBsAg and anti-HBcAg positive samples were also analyzed for HBeAg, anti-HBeAg and anti-HBcAgIgM markers. HBV infection rate of 24.1% was observed and, from them, 0.7% were positive for HBsAg. Viral DNA was detected by PCR in two HBsAg positive samples. A vaccination index of 74.5% and a global index of 89.9% of serological response to vaccination were observed. The direct work with biological fluids as well as cleaning workers represented significant risks for acquisition of HBV infection. The data from the present study showed an increase of the vaccination index among laboratory staff but the rates of HBV infection did not change through the years in the region.
    Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical 01/2005; 38(2):153-6. DOI:10.1590/S0037-86822005000200005 · 0.94 Impact Factor