Yun Xia

The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States

Are you Yun Xia?

Claim your profile

Publications (56)452.61 Total impact

  • Gastroenterology 04/2015; 148(4):S-540. DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(15)31809-6 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the musculature. Exposure to β-NAD did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD and adenosine, as well as the P2Y1 receptor antagonists, MRS2179 or MRS2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, CCPA, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with CCPA suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with DPCPX suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically-evoked contractions. The results did not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. β-NAD influence on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. Copyright © 2014, American Journal of Physiology- Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 03/2015; 308(11):ajpgi.00430.2014. DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.00430.2014 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mast cells expressed the substance P NK1 receptor and the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor in guinea pig and human small intestine. Enzyme-linked immuno assay (ELISA) showed that activation of intramural afferents by antidromic electrical stimulation or by capsaicin, released substance P and CGRP from human and guinea pig intestinal segments. Electrical stimulation of the afferents evoked slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (slow EPSPs) in the enteric nervous system (ENS). The slow EPSPs were mediated by tachykinin NK1 and CGRP receptors. Capsaicin evoked slow EPSP-like responses that were suppressed by antagonists for protease activated receptor 2. Afferent stimulation evoked slow EPSP-like excitation that was suppressed by mast cell stabilizing drugs. Histamine and mast cell protease II were released by: i) exposure to substance P or CGRP; ii) capsaicin; iii) compound 48/80; iv) elevation of mast cell Ca(2+) by ionophore, A23187; v) antidromic electrical stimulation of afferents. The mast cell stabilizers, cromolyn or doxantrazole, suppressed release of protease II and histamine when evoked by substance P, CGRP, capsaicin, A23187, electrical stimulation of afferents or compound 48/80. Neural blockade by tetrodotoxin prevented mast cell protease II release in response to antidromic electrical stimulation of mesenteric afferents. The results support a hypothesis that afferent innervation of enteric mast cells releases histamine and mast cell protease II, both of which are known to act in diffuse paracrine manner to influence the behavior of ENS neurons and to elevate the sensitivity of spinal afferent terminals.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 08/2014; 307(7). DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.00125.2014 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2014; 146(5):S-89. DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(14)60322-X · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Digestion of dietary protein elevates intraluminal concentrations of glutamate in the small intestine, some of which gain access to the enteric nervous system (ENS). Glutamate, in the central nervous system (CNS), is an excitatory neurotransmitter. A dogma that glutamatergic neurophysiology in the ENS recapitulates CNS glutamatergic function persists. We reassessed the premise that glutamatergic signaling in the ENS recapitulates its neurotransmitter role in the CNS. Pharmacological analysis of actions of receptor agonists and antagonists in concert with immunohistochemical localization of glutamate transporters and receptors was used. Analysis focused on intracellularly-recorded electrical and synaptic behavior of ENS neurons, on stimulation of mucosal secretion by secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus and on muscle contractile behavior mediated by musculomotor neurons in the myenteric plexus. Immunoreactivity for glutamate was expressed in ENS neurons. ENS neurons expressed immunoreactivity for the EAAC-1 glutamate transporter. Neither L-glutamate nor glutamatergic receptor agonists had excitatory actions on ENS neurons. Metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonists did not directly stimulate neurogenic mucosal chloride secretion. Neither L-glutamate nor the metabotropic glutamatergic receptor agonist, aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), changed the mean amplitude of spontaneously occurring contractions in circular or longitudinal strips of intestinal wall from either guinea pig or human small intestinal preparations. Early discoveries, for excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission in the CNS, inspired enthusiasm that investigation in the ENS would yield discoveries recapitulating the CNS glutamatergic story. We found this not to be the case.
    Journal of neurogastroenterology and motility 01/2014; 20(1):41-53. DOI:10.5056/jnm.2014.20.1.41 · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Serotonin (5-HT) is released from enterochromaffin cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. We tested a hypothesis that elevation of 5-HT in the environment of enteric mast cells might degranulate the mast cells and release mediators that become paracrine signals to the enteric nervous system, spinal afferents and secretory glands. The studies were done for guinea pig small intestine and segments of human jejunum discarded during Roux-En-Y gastric bypass surgeries. Western blots, immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and pharmacological analysis were used to study expression of 5-HT receptors by mast cells in the small intestine and action of 5-HT to degranulate the mast cells and release histamine. Mast cells in human and guinea pig preparations expressed the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. ELISA detected spontaneous release of histamine in guinea pig and human preparations. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8- hydroxy-PIPAT, evoked release of histamine. A selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100135, suppressed stimulation of histamine release by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT. Mast cell stabilizing drugs, doxantrazole and cromolyn sodium, suppressed the release of histamine evoked by 5-HT or 8-hydroxy-PIPAT in guinea pig and human preparations. Our results support the hypothesis that serotonergic degranulation of enteric mast cells and release of preformed mediators, including histamine, is mediated by the 5-HT1A serotonergic receptor subtype. Association of serotonin with the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome) underlies a question of whether selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonists might have therapeutic application in disorders of this nature.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 03/2013; 304(10). DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.00421.2012 · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) are major downstream mediators of neuronal calcium signaling that regulate multiple neuronal functions. CaMKII, one of the key CaMKs, plays a significant role in mediating cellular responses to external signaling molecules. Although calcium signaling plays an essential role in the enteric nervous system (ENS), the role of CaMKII in neurogenic intestinal function has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the function and expression pattern of CaMKII in the ENS across several mammalian species. CaMKII expression was characterized by immunofluorescence analyses and Western Blot. CaMKII function was examined by intracellular recordings and by assays of colonic contractile activity. Immunoreactivity for CaMKII was detected in the ENS of guinea pig, mouse, rat and human preparations. In guinea pig ENS, CaMKII immunoreactivity was enriched in both nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- and calretinin-containing myenteric plexus neurons and non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons in the submucosal plexus. CaMKII immunoreactivity was also expressed in both cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the ENS of mouse, rat and human. The selective CaMKII inhibitor, KN-62, suppressed stimulus-evoked purinergic slow EPSPs and ATP-induced slow EPSP-like response in guinea pig submucosal plexus, suggesting that CaMKII activity is required for some metabotropic synaptic transmissions in the ENS. More importantly, KN-62 significantly suppressed tetrodotoxin-induced contractile response in mouse colon, which suggests that CaMKII activity is a major determinant of the tonic neurogenic inhibition of this tissue. ENS neurons across multiple mammalian species express CaMKII. CaMKII signaling constitutes an important molecular mechanism for controlling intestinal motility and secretion by regulating the excitability of musculomotor and secretomotor neurons. These findings revealed a fundamental role of CaMKII in the ENS and provide clues for the treatment of intestinal dysfunctions.
    PLoS ONE 08/2012; 7(8):e44426. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0044426 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Treatments with morphine or opioid agonists cause constipation. Lubiprostone is approved for treatment of adult idiopathic constipation and constipation-predominant IBS in adult women. We tested whether lubiprostone can reverse morphine-suppression of mucosal secretion in human intestine and explored the mechanism of action. Fresh segments of jejunum discarded during Roux-En-Y gastric bypass surgeries were used. Changes in short-circuit current (ΔIsc) were recorded in Ussing flux chambers as a marker for electrogenic chloride secretion during pharmacological interactions between morphine, prostaglandin receptor antagonists, chloride channel blockers and lubiprostone. Morphine suppressed basal Isc. Lubiprostone reversed morphine suppression of basal Isc. Lubiprostone, applied to the mucosa in concentrations ranging from 3 nM to 30 μM, evoked increases in Isc in concentration-dependent manner when applied to the mucosal side of muscle-stripped preparations. Blockade of enteric nerves did not change stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Removal of chloride or application of bumetanide or NPPB suppressed or abolished responses to lubiprostone. Antagonists acting at CFTR channels and prostaglandin EP(4) receptors, but not at E(1), EP(1-3) receptors, partially suppressed stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Antisecretory action of morphine results from suppression of excitability of secretomotor neurons in the enteric nervous system. Lubiprostone, which does not affect enteric neurons directly, bypasses the action of morphine by directly opening mucosal chloride channels.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 02/2011; 56(2):330-8. DOI:10.1007/s10620-010-1515-8 · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2011; 140(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(11)62741-8 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2011; 140(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(11)60799-3 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2011; 140(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(11)60409-5 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lubiprostone activates ClC-2 chloride channels in epithelia. It is approved for treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in adults and constipation-predominate irritable bowel syndrome in women. We tested a hypothesis that lubiprostone can reverse the constipating action of morphine and investigated the mechanism of action. Short-circuit current (Isc) was recorded in Ussing chambers as a marker for chloride secretion during pharmacological interactions between morphine and lubiprostone. Measurements of fecal wet weight were used to obtain information on morphine-lubiprostone interactions in conscious mice. Morphine decreased basal Isc, with an IC(50) of 96.1 nM. The action of dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), a nicotinic receptor agonist that stimulates neurogenic Isc, was suppressed by morphine. Lubiprostone applied after pretreatment with morphine reversed morphine suppression of both basal Isc and DMPP-evoked chloride secretion. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) of submucosal neurons evoked biphasic increases in Isc. Morphine abolished the first phase and marginally suppressed the second phase. Lubiprostone reversed, in concentration-dependent manner, the action of morphine on the first and second phases of the EFS-evoked responses. Subcutaneous lubiprostone increased fecal wet weight and numbers of pellets expelled. Morphine significantly reduced fecal wet weight and number of pellets. Injection of lubiprostone, 30-min after morphine, reversed morphine-induced suppression of fecal wet weight. We conclude that inhibitory action of morphine on chloride secretion reflects suppression of excitability of cholinergic secretomotor neurons in the enteric nervous system. Lubiprostone, which does not directly affect enteric neurons, bypasses the neurogenic constipating effects of morphine by directly opening chloride channels in the mucosal epithelium.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 07/2010; 334(1):333-40. DOI:10.1124/jpet.110.166116 · 3.86 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2010; 138(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(10)62860-0 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2010; 138(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(10)62867-3 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2010; 138(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(10)61267-X · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2009; 136(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(09)60228-6 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2009; 136(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(09)62548-8 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2009; 136(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(09)60090-1 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2009; 136(5):A-554. DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(09)62547-6 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Actions of lubiprostone, a selective type-2 chloride channel activator, on mucosal secretion were investigated in guinea pig small intestine and colon. Flat-sheet preparations were mounted in Ussing flux chambers for recording short-circuit current (Isc) as a marker for electrogenic chloride secretion. Lubiprostone, applied to the small intestinal mucosa in eight concentrations ranging from 1-3000 nM, evoked increases in Isc in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 42.5 nM. Lubiprostone applied to the mucosa of the colon in eight concentrations ranging from 1-3000 nM evoked increases in Isc in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 31.7 nM. Blockade of enteric nerves by tetrodotoxin did not influence stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Antagonists acting at prostaglandin (PG)E2, EP1-3, or EP4 receptors did not suppress stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone but suppressed or abolished PGE2-evoked responses. Substitution of gluconate for chloride abolished all responses to lubiprostone. The selective CFTR channel blocker, CFTR(inh)-172, did not suppress lubiprostone-evoked Isc. The broadly acting blocker, glibenclamide, suppressed (P<0.001) lubiprostone-evoked Isc. Lubiprostone, in the presence of tetrodotoxin, enhanced carbachol-evoked Isc. The cholinergic component, but not the putative vasoactive intestinal peptide component, of neural responses to electrical field stimulation was enhanced by lubiprostone. Application of any of the prostaglandins, E2, F2, or I2, evoked depolarization of the resting membrane potential in enteric neurons. Unlike the prostaglandins, lubiprostone did not alter the electrical behavior of enteric neurons. Exposure to the histamine H2 receptor agonists increased basal Isc followed by persistent cyclical increases in Isc. Lubiprostone increased the peak amplitude of the dimaprit-evoked cycles.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 02/2009; 296(4):G823-32. DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.90447.2008 · 3.74 Impact Factor