Jennifer Cho

United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

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Publications (7)39.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The formation of symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is a phenomenon common to the majority of vascular flowering plants. Here, we used cDNA arrays to examine transcript profiles in Medicago truncatula roots during the development of an AM symbiosis with Glomus versiforme and during growth under differing phosphorus nutrient regimes. Three percent of the genes examined showed significant changes in transcript levels during the development of the symbiosis. Most genes showing increased transcript levels in mycorrhizal roots showed no changes in response to high phosphorus, suggesting that alterations in transcript levels during symbiosis were a consequence of the AM fungus rather than a secondary effect of improved phosphorus nutrition. Among the mycorrhiza-induced genes, two distinct temporal expression patterns were evident. Members of one group showed an increase in transcripts during the initial period of contact between the symbionts and a subsequent decrease as the symbiosis developed. Defense- and stress-response genes were a significant component of this group. Genes in the second group showed a sustained increase in transcript levels that correlated with the colonization of the root system. The latter group contained a significant proportion of new genes similar to components of signal transduction pathways, suggesting that novel signaling pathways are activated during the development of the symbiosis. Analysis of the spatial expression patterns of two mycorrhiza-induced genes revealed distinct expression patterns consistent with the hypothesis that gene expression in mycorrhizal roots is signaled by both cell-autonomous and cell-nonautonomous signals.
    The Plant Cell 10/2003; 15(9):2106-23. · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares similar biology with other members of the Solanaceae, yet has features unique within the family, such as modified stems (stolons) that develop into edible tubers. To better understand potato biology, we have undertaken a survey of the potato transcriptome using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from diverse tissues. A total of 61,940 ESTs were generated from aerial tissues, below-ground tissues, and tissues challenged with the late-blight pathogen (Phytophthora infestans). Clustering and assembly of these ESTs resulted in a total of 19,892 unique sequences with 8,741 tentative consensus sequences and 11,151 singleton ESTs. We were able to identify a putative function for 43.7% of these sequences. A number of sequences (48) were expressed throughout the libraries sampled, representing constitutively expressed sequences. Other sequences (13,068, 21%) were uniquely expressed and were detected only in a single library. Using hierarchal and k means clustering of the EST sequences, we were able to correlate changes in gene expression with major physiological events in potato biology. Using pair-wise comparisons of tuber-related tissues, we were able to associate genes with tuber initiation, dormancy, and sprouting. We also were able to identify a number of characterized as well as novel sequences that were unique to the incompatible interaction of late-blight pathogen, thereby providing a foundation for further understanding the mechanism of resistance.
    Plant physiology 03/2003; 131(2):419-29. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic and environmental factors affect the efficiency of pork production by influencing gene expression during porcine reproduction, tissue development, and growth. The identification and functional analysis of gene products important to these processes would be greatly enhanced by the development of a database of expressed porcine gene sequence. Two normalized porcine cDNA libraries (MARC 1PIG and MARC 2PIG), derived respectively from embryonic and reproductive tissues, were constructed, sequenced, and analyzed. A total of 66,245 clones from these two libraries were 5?-end sequenced and deposited in GenBank. Cluster analysis revealed that within-library redundancy is low, and comparison of all porcine ESTs with the human database suggests that the sequences from these two libraries represent portions of a significant number of independent pig genes. A Porcine Gene Index (PGI), comprising 15,616 tentative consensus sequences and 31,466 singletons, includes all sequences in public repositories and has been developed to facilitate further comparative map development and characterization of porcine genes (http://www.tigr.org/tdb/ssgi/). The clones and sequences from these libraries provide a catalog of expressed porcine genes and a resource for development of high-density hybridization arrays for transcriptional profiling of porcine tissues. In addition, comparison of porcine ESTs with sequences from other species serves as a valuable resource for comparative map development. Both arrayed cDNA libraries are available for unrestricted public use.
    Mammalian Genome 09/2002; 13(8):475-8. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Functional genomic studies of the mammary gland require an appropriate collection of cDNA sequences to assess gene expression patterns from the different developmental and operational states of underlying cell types. To better capture the range of gene expression, a normalized cDNA library was constructed from pooled bovine mammary tissues, and 23,202 expressed sequence tags (EST) were produced and deposited into GenBank. Assembly of these EST with sequences in the Bos taurus Gene Index (BtGI) helped to form 5751 of the current 23,883 tentative consensus (TC) sequences. The majority (87%) of these 5751 assemblies contained only one to three mammary-derived EST. In contrast, 18% of the mammary EST assembled with TC sequences corresponding to 12 genes. These results suggest library normalization was only partially effective, because the reduction in EST for genes abundantly transcribed during lactation could be attributed to pooling. For better assessment of novel content in the mammary library and to add to existing annotation of all bovine sequence elements, gene ontology assignments, and comparative sequence analyses against human genome sequence, human and rodent gene indices, and an index of orthologous alignments of genes across eukaryotes (TOGA) were performed, and results were added to existing BtGI annotation. Over 35,000 of the bovine elements significantly matched human genome sequence, and the positions of some alignments (3%) were unique relative to those using human expressed sequences. Because 3445 TC sequences had no significant match with any data set, mammary-derived cDNA clones representing 23 of these elements were analyzed further for expression and novelty. Only one clone met criteria suggesting the corresponding gene was a divergent ortholog or expressed sequence unique to cattle. These results demonstrate that bovine sequence expression data serve as a resource for characterizing mammalian transcriptomes and identifying those genes potentially unique to ruminants.
    Mammalian Genome 08/2002; 13(7):373-9. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    Mammalian Genome 07/2002; 13(8):475-478. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    Mammalian Genome 06/2002; 13(7):373-379. · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Comparative genomics promises to rapidly accelerate the identification and functional classification of biologically important human genes. We developed the TIGR Orthologous Gene Alignment (TOGA; <http://www.tigr.org/tdb/toga/toga.shtml>) database to provide a cross-reference between fully and partially sequenced eukaryotic transcribed sequences. Starting with the assembled expressed sequence tag (EST) and gene sequences that comprise the 28 TIGR Gene Indices, we used high-stringency pair-wise sequence searches and a reflexive, transitive closure process to associate sequence-specific best hits, generating 32,652 tentative ortholog groups (TOGs). This has allowed us to identify putative orthologs and paralogs for known genes, as well as those that exist only as uncharacterized ESTs and to provide links to additional information including genome sequence and mapping data. TOGA provides an important new resource for the analysis of gene function in eukaryotes. In addition, an analysis of the most widely represented sequences can begin to provide insight into eukaryotic biological processes.
    Genome Research 03/2002; 12(3):493-502. · 14.40 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

499 Citations
39.88 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002
    • United States Department of Agriculture
      • Agricultural Research Service (ARS)
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • Biomedical Research Institute, Rockville
      Maryland, United States