Gloria M Coruzzi

CUNY Graduate Center, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (122)843.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mutualistic symbioses between eukaryotes and beneficial microorganisms of their microbiome play an essential role in nutrition, protection against disease, and development of the host. However, the impact of beneficial symbionts on the evolution of host genomes remains poorly characterized. Here we used the independent loss of the most widespread plant-microbe symbiosis, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM), as a model to address this question. Using a large phenotypic approach and phylogenetic analyses, we present evidence that loss of AM symbiosis correlates with the loss of many symbiotic genes in the Arabidopsis lineage (Brassicales). Then, by analyzing the genome and/or transcriptomes of nine other phylogenetically divergent non-host plants, we show that this correlation occurred in a convergent manner in four additional plant lineages, demonstrating the existence of an evolutionary pattern specific to symbiotic genes. Finally, we use a global comparative phylogenomic approach to track this evolutionary pattern among land plants. Based on this approach, we identify a set of 174 highly conserved genes and demonstrate enrichment in symbiosis-related genes. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that beneficial symbionts maintain purifying selection on host gene networks during the evolution of entire lineages.
    PLoS Genetics 07/2014; 10(7):e1004487. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • Ying Li, Gabriel Krouk, Gloria M Coruzzi, Sandrine Ruffel
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    ABSTRACT: The ability of plants to sense their nitrogen (N) microenvironment in the soil and deploy strategic root growth in N-rich patches requires exquisite systems integration. Remarkably, this new paradigm for systems biology research has intrigued plant biologists for more than a century, when a split-root framework was first used to study how plants sense and respond to heterogeneous soil nutrient environments. This systemic N-signalling mechanism, allowing plants to sense and forage for mineral nutrients in resource-rich patches, has important implications for agriculture. In this review, we will focus on how advances in the post-genomic era have uncovered the gene regulatory networks underlying systemic N-signalling. After defining how local and systemic N-signalling can be experimentally distinguished for molecular study using a split-root system, the genetic factors that have been shown to mediate local and/or systemic N-signalling are reviewed. Second, the genetic mechanism of this regulatory system is broadened to the whole genome level. To do this, publicly available N-related transcriptomic datasets are compared with genes that have previously been identified as local and systemic N responders in a split-root transcriptome dataset. Specifically, (i) it was found that transcriptional reprogramming triggered by homogeneous N-treatments is composed of both local and systemic responses, (ii) the spatio-temporal signature of local versus systemic responsive genes is defined, and (iii) the conservation of systemic N-signalling between Arabidopsis and Medicago is assessed. Finally, the potential mediators, i.e. metabolites and phytohormones, of the N-related long-distance signals, are discussed.
    Journal of Experimental Botany 06/2014; · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The dynamic nature of gene regulatory networks allows cells to rapidly respond to environmental change. However, the underlying temporal connections are missed, even in kinetic studies, as transcription factor (TF) binding within at least one time point is required to identify primary targets. The TF-regulated but unbound genes are dismissed as secondary targets. Instead, we report that these genes comprise transient TF-target interactions most relevant to rapid signal transduction. We temporally perturbed a master TF (Basic Leucine Zipper 1, bZIP1) and the nitrogen (N) signal it transduces and integrated TF regulation and binding data from the same cell samples. Our enabling approach could identify primary TF targets based solely on gene regulation, in the absence of TF binding. We uncovered three classes of primary TF targets: (i) poised (TF-bound but not TF-regulated), (ii) stable (TF-bound and TF-regulated), and (iii) transient (TF-regulated but not TF-bound), the largest class. Unexpectedly, the transient bZIP1 targets are uniquely relevant to rapid N signaling in planta, enriched in dynamic N-responsive genes, and regulated by TF and N signal interactions. These transient targets include early N responders nitrate transporter 2.1 and NIN-like protein 3, bound by bZIP1 at 1-5 min, but not at later time points following TF perturbation. Moreover, promoters of these transient targets are uniquely enriched with cis-regulatory motifs coinherited with bZIP1 binding sites, suggesting a recruitment role for bZIP1. This transient mode of TF action supports a classic, but forgotten, "hit-and-run" transcription model, which enables a "catalyst TF" to activate a large set of targets within minutes of signal perturbation.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2014; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitrate and other nitrogen metabolites can act as signals that regulate global gene expression in plants. Adaptive changes in plant morphology and physiology triggered by changes in nitrate availability are partly explained by these changes in gene expression. Despite several genome-wide efforts to identify nitrate-regulated genes, no comprehensive study of the Arabidopsis root transcriptome under contrasting nitrate conditions has been carried out. In this work, we employed the Illumina high throughput sequencing technology to perform an integrated analysis of the poly-A + enriched and the small RNA fractions of the Arabidopsis thaliana root transcriptome in response to nitrate treatments. Our sequencing strategy identified new nitrate-regulated genes including 40 genes not represented in the ATH1 Affymetrix GeneChip, a novel nitrate-responsive antisense transcript and a new nitrate responsive miRNA/TARGET module consisting of a novel microRNA, miR5640 and its target, AtPPC3. Sequencing of small RNAs and mRNAs uncovered new genes, and enabled us to develop new hypotheses for nitrate regulation and coordination of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.
    BMC Genomics 10/2013; 14(1):701. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Members of the plant NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER (NRT1/PTR) family display protein sequence homology with the SLC15/PepT/PTR/POT family of peptide transporters in animals. In comparison to their animal and bacterial counterparts, these plant proteins transport a wide variety of substrates: nitrate, peptides, amino acids, dicarboxylates, glucosinolates, IAA, and ABA. The phylogenetic relationship of the members of the NRT1/PTR family in 31 fully sequenced plant genomes allowed the identification of unambiguous clades, defining eight subfamilies. The phylogenetic tree was used to determine a unified nomenclature of this family named NPF, for NRT1/PTR FAMILY. We propose that the members should be named accordingly: NPFX.Y, where X denotes the subfamily and Y the individual member within the species.
    Trends in Plant Science 09/2013; · 11.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plant development is remarkably plastic but how precisely can the plant customize its form to specific environments? When the plant adjusts its development to different environments, related traits can change in a coordinated fashion, such that two traits co-vary across many genotypes. Alternatively, traits can vary independently, such that a change in one trait has little predictive value for the change in a second trait. To characterize such "tunability" in developmental plasticity, we carried out a detailed phenotypic characterization of complex root traits among 96 accessions of the model Arabidopsis thaliana in two nitrogen environments. The results revealed a surprising level of independence in the control of traits to environment - a highly tunable form of plasticity. We mapped genetic architecture of plasticity using genome-wide association studies and further used gene expression analysis to narrow down gene candidates in mapped regions. Mutants in genes implicated by association and expression analysis showed precise defects in the predicted traits in the predicted environment, corroborating the independent control of plasticity traits. The overall results suggest that there is a pool of genetic variability in plants that controls traits in specific environments, with opportunity to tune crop plants to a given environment.
    PLoS Genetics 09/2013; 9(9):e1003760. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phenotypic plasticity is presumed to be involved in adaptive change toward species diversification. We thus examined how candidate genes underlying natural variation across populations might also mediate plasticity within an individual. Our implementation of an integrative "plasticity space" approach revealed that the root plasticity of a single Arabidopsis accession exposed to distinct environments broadly recapitulates the natural variation "space." Genome-wide association mapping identified the known gene PHOSPHATE 1 (PHO1) and other genes such as Root System Architecture 1 (RSA1) associated with differences in root allometry, a highly plastic trait capturing the distribution of lateral roots along the primary axis. The response of mutants in the Columbia-0 background suggests their involvement in signaling key modulators of root development including auxin, abscisic acid, and nitrate. Moreover, genotype-by-environment interactions for the PHO1 and RSA1 genes in Columbia-0 phenocopy the root allometry of other natural variants. This finding supports a role for plasticity responses in phenotypic evolution in natural environments.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2013; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of systems biology is to generate models for predicting how a system will react under untested conditions or in response to genetic perturbations. This paper discusses experimental and analytical approaches to deriving causal relationships in gene regulatory networks.
    Genome biology 06/2013; 14(6):123. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The architecture of plant roots affects essential functions including nutrient and water uptake, soil anchorage, and symbiotic interactions. Root architecture comprises many features that arise from the growth of the primary and lateral root. These root features are dictated by the genetic background, but are also highly responsive to the environment. Thus, Root System Architecture (RSA) represents an important and complex trait that is highly variable, affected by genotype x environment interactions, and relevant to survival/performance. Quantification of RSA in Arabidopsis thaliana using plate-based tissue culture is a very common and relatively rapid assay, but quantifying RSA represents an experimental bottleneck when it comes to medium or high-throughput approaches used in mutant or genotype screens. Here, we present "RootScape", a landmark-based allometric method for rapid phenotyping of Root System Architecture using Arabidopsis as a case study. Using the software AAMToolbox, we created a 20-point landmark model that captures RSA as one integrated trait, and used this model to quantify changes in the RSA of Arabidopsis (Col-0) wild-type plants grown under different hormone treatments. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to compare RootScape to conventional methods designed to measure root architecture. This analysis showed that RootScape efficiently captured nearly all the variation in root architecture detected by measuring individual root traits, and is five-to-ten times faster than conventional scoring. We validated RootScape by quantifying the plasticity of RSA in several mutant lines affected in hormone signaling. The RootScape analysis recapitulated previous results that described complex phenotypes in the mutants and identified novel gene-by-environment interactions.
    Plant physiology 01/2013; · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    Molecular Plant 01/2013; · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.
    Year: 04/2012
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    ABSTRACT: A novel result of the current research is the development and implementation of a unique functional phylogenomic approach that explores the genomic origins of seed plant diversification. We first use 22,833 sets of orthologs from the nuclear genomes of 101 genera across land plants to reconstruct their phylogenetic relationships. One of the more salient results is the resolution of some enigmatic relationships in seed plant phylogeny, such as the placement of Gnetales as sister to the rest of the gymnosperms. In using this novel phylogenomic approach, we were also able to identify overrepresented functional gene ontology categories in genes that provide positive branch support for major nodes prompting new hypotheses for genes associated with the diversification of angiosperms. For example, RNA interference (RNAi) has played a significant role in the divergence of monocots from other angiosperms, which has experimental support in Arabidopsis and rice. This analysis also implied that the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV and V (NRPD2) played a prominent role in the divergence of gymnosperms. This hypothesis is supported by the lack of 24nt siRNA in conifers, the maternal control of small RNA in the seeds of flowering plants, and the emergence of double fertilization in angiosperms. Our approach takes advantage of genomic data to define orthologs, reconstruct relationships, and narrow down candidate genes involved in plant evolution within a phylogenomic view of species' diversification.
    PLoS Genetics 12/2011; 7(12):e1002411. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As sessile organisms, root plasticity enables plants to forage for and acquire nutrients in a fluctuating underground environment. Here, we use genetic and genomic approaches in a "split-root" framework--in which physically isolated root systems of the same plant are challenged with different nitrogen (N) environments--to investigate how systemic signaling affects genome-wide reprogramming and root development. The integration of transcriptome and root phenotypes enables us to identify distinct mechanisms underlying "N economy" (i.e., N supply and demand) of plants as a system. Under nitrate-limited conditions, plant roots adopt an "active-foraging strategy", characterized by lateral root outgrowth and a shared pattern of transcriptome reprogramming, in response to either local or distal nitrate deprivation. By contrast, in nitrate-replete conditions, plant roots adopt a "dormant strategy", characterized by a repression of lateral root outgrowth and a shared pattern of transcriptome reprogramming, in response to either local or distal nitrate supply. Sentinel genes responding to systemic N signaling identified by genome-wide comparisons of heterogeneous vs. homogeneous split-root N treatments were used to probe systemic N responses in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in nitrate reduction and hormone synthesis and also in decapitated plants. This combined analysis identified genetically distinct systemic signaling underlying plant N economy: (i) N supply, corresponding to a long-distance systemic signaling triggered by nitrate sensing; and (ii) N demand, experimental support for the transitive closure of a previously inferred nitrate-cytokinin shoot-root relay system that reports the nitrate demand of the whole plant, promoting a compensatory root growth in nitrate-rich patches of heterogeneous soil.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2011; 108(45):18524-9. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In plants, root nitrate uptake systems are under systemic feedback repression by the N satiety of the whole organism, thus adjusting the N acquisition capacity to the N demand for growth; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We previously isolated the Arabidopsis high nitrogen-insensitive 9-1 (hni9-1) mutant, impaired in the systemic feedback repression of the root nitrate transporter NRT2.1 by high N supply. Here, we show that HNI9 encodes Arabidopsis INTERACT WITH SPT6 (AtIWS1), an evolutionary conserved component of the RNA polymerase II complex. HNI9/AtIWS1 acts in roots to repress NRT2.1 transcription in response to high N supply. At a genomic level, HNI9/AtIWS1 is shown to play a broader role in N signaling by regulating several hundred N-responsive genes in roots. Repression of NRT2.1 transcription by high N supply is associated with an HNI9/AtIWS1-dependent increase in histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation at the NRT2.1 locus. Our findings highlight the hypothesis that posttranslational chromatin modifications control nutrient acquisition in plants.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2011; 108(32):13329-34. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a particular genotype to produce diverse phenotypes when exposed to different environmental conditions. Despite advances in our understanding of the theoretical and empirical aspects of phenotypic plasticity, little is known on how multiple environmental signals are integrated in regulating developmental responses. To begin to describe the morphometric space that enables a plant to explore its environment, we performed experiments in which Arabidopsis plants were grown under five conditions known to control root architecture: two environmental/ nutritional signals (NO3, NH4) plus three hormones (IAA, CK, ABA). To quantify the overall root system architecture, we used landmark-based morphometrics in combination with Principal Component Analysis to describe the way in which a root system as a whole occupies the soil space, a novel approach in root architecture studies. This method allowed an intuitive, integrated, and unbiased assessment of the root architecture system compared to traditional measurements of individual traits like primary and lateral root length. Thus, we created a quantitative root architecture plasticity space (RAPS) defined by the Principal Component axes. Four Principal Components captured more than 90% of the variation, some of which were largely driven by particular treatments. Taken as a whole, this morphometric analysis of the root architecture plasticity and its quantification with novel tools will provide a framework to address questions on the evolution of developmental plasticity and adaptation to different environments.
    22nd International Conference on Arabidopsis Research; 06/2011
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that nutrient availability controls plant development. Moreover, plant development is finely tuned by a myriad of hormonal signals. Thus, it is not surprising to see increasing evidence of coordination between nutritional and hormonal signaling. In this opinion article, we discuss how nitrogen signals control the hormonal status of plants and how hormonal signals interplay with nitrogen nutrition. We further expand the discussion to include other nutrient-hormone pairs. We propose that nutrition and growth are linked by a multi-level, feed-forward cycle that regulates plant growth, development and metabolism via dedicated signaling pathways that mediate nutrient and hormonal regulation. We believe this model will provide a useful concept for past and future research in this field.
    Trends in Plant Science 03/2011; 16(4):178-82. · 11.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitrate, acting as both a nitrogen source and a signaling molecule, controls many aspects of plant development. However, gene networks involved in plant adaptation to fluctuating nitrate environments have not yet been identified. Here we use time-series transcriptome data to decipher gene relationships and consequently to build core regulatory networks involved in Arabidopsis root adaptation to nitrate provision. The experimental approach has been to monitor genome-wide responses to nitrate at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 20 minutes using Affymetrix ATH1 gene chips. This high-resolution time course analysis demonstrated that the previously known primary nitrate response is actually preceded by a very fast gene expression modulation, involving genes and functions needed to prepare plants to use or reduce nitrate. A state-space model inferred from this microarray time-series data successfully predicts gene behavior in unlearnt conditions. The experiments and methods allow us to propose a temporal working model for nitrate-driven gene networks. This network model is tested both in silico and experimentally. For example, the over-expression of a predicted gene hub encoding a transcription factor induced early in the cascade indeed leads to the modification of the kinetic nitrate response of sentinel genes such as NIR, NIA2, and NRT1.1, and several other transcription factors. The potential nitrate/hormone connections implicated by this time-series data are also evaluated.
    Genome biology 12/2010; 11(12):R123. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nitrate (NO(3)(-)) is a key nutrient as well as a signaling molecule that impacts both metabolism and development of plants. Understanding the complexity of the regulatory networks that control nitrate uptake, metabolism, and associated responses has the potential to provide solutions that address the major issues of nitrate pollution and toxicity that threaten agricultural and ecological sustainability and human health. Recently, major advances have been made in cataloguing the nitrate transcriptome and in identifying key components that mediate nitrate signaling. In this perspective, we describe the genes involved in nitrate regulation and how they influence nitrate transport and assimilation, and we discuss the role of systems biology approaches in elucidating the gene networks involved in NO(3)(-) signaling adaptation to fluctuating environments.
    Current opinion in plant biology 06/2010; 13(3):266-73. · 10.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One of the most striking examples of plant developmental plasticity to changing environmental conditions is the modulation of root system architecture (RSA) in response to nitrate supply. Despite the fundamental and applied significance of understanding this process, the molecular mechanisms behind nitrate-regulated changes in developmental programs are still largely unknown. Small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as master regulators of gene expression in plants and other organisms. To evaluate the role of sRNAs in the nitrate response, we sequenced sRNAs from control and nitrate-treated Arabidopsis seedlings using the 454 sequencing technology. miR393 was induced by nitrate in these experiments. miR393 targets transcripts that code for a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor and for the auxin receptors TIR1, AFB1, AFB2, and AFB3. However, only AFB3 was regulated by nitrate in roots under our experimental conditions. Analysis of the expression of this miR393/AFB3 module, revealed an incoherent feed-forward mechanism that is induced by nitrate and repressed by N metabolites generated by nitrate reduction and assimilation. To understand the functional role of this N-regulatory module for plant development, we analyzed the RSA response to nitrate in AFB3 insertional mutant plants and in miR393 overexpressors. RSA analysis in these plants revealed that both primary and lateral root growth responses to nitrate were altered. Interestingly, regulation of RSA by nitrate was specifically mediated by AFB3, indicating that miR393/AFB3 is a unique N-responsive module that controls root system architecture in response to external and internal N availability in Arabidopsis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2010; 107(9):4477-82. · 9.81 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
843.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994–2014
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2002–2011
    • American Museum of Natural History
      • Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2010
    • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
      • Departamento de Genética Molecular y Microbiología
      Santiago, Region Metropolitana de Santiago, Chile
  • 2009
    • Montclair State University
      Upper Montclair, New Jersey, United States
  • 2003–2009
    • New York Botanical Garden
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1994–2009
    • New York University
      • • Center for Genomics and Systems Biology
      • • Department of Biology
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2008
    • Marine Biological Laboratory
      Falmouth, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2004
    • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
      New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
  • 1998–2003
    • The Chinese University of Hong Kong
      • Department of Biology
      Hong Kong, Hong Kong
  • 1995
    • Mount Holyoke College
      South Hadley, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1984–1991
    • The Rockefeller University
      • Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 1979
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Biological Sciences
      New York City, NY, United States