H Bryant Nguyen

Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States

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Publications (48)152.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have reported decreased overall severe sepsis mortality, but associations with organism trends have not yet been investigated. This study explored organism-specific severe sepsis mortality trends from 1999 to 2008 in a large hospital-based administrative database.
    Critical care medicine. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Sonographic evaluation of neck anatomy before performing percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) has been shown to predict PDT success. In this study, we compared the real-time, long-axis, in-plane approach to the traditional bronchoscopically guided landmark technique.
    Journal of ultrasound in medicine: official journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine 08/2014; 33(8):1407-15. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate age-related differences in inflammation biomarkers during the first 72 hours of hospitalization for sepsis.
    Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 06/2014; · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale. We recently reported two novel biomarkers for acute kidney injury (AKI), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7), both related to G1 cell cycle arrest. Objectives. We now validate a clinical test for urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] at a high-sensitivity cutoff > 0.3 for AKI risk stratification in a diverse population of critically ill patients. Methods. We conducted a prospective multicenter study of 420 critically ill patients. The primary analysis was the ability of urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] to predict moderate to severe AKI within 12 hours. AKI was adjudicated by a committee of three independent expert nephrologists who were blinded to the results of the test. Measurements. Urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 were measured using a clinical immunoassay platform. Main Results. The primary endpoint was reached in 17% of patients. For a single urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] test, sensitivity at the pre-specified high-sensitivity cutoff of 0.3 (ng/ml)2/1000 was 92% (95% CI 85%-98%) with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.18 (95% CI 0.06-0.33). Critically ill patients with urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] > 0.3 had seven times the risk for AKI (95% CI 4-22) compared to critically ill patients with a test result below 0.3. In a multivariate model including clinical information, urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] remained statistically significant and a strong predictor of AKI (AUC 0.70, 95% CI 0.63-0.76 for clinical variables alone, versus AUC 0.86, 95% CI 0.80-0.90 for clinical variables plus [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7]). Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] > 0.3 (ng/ml)2/1000 identifies patients at risk for imminent AKI. Funding. Funded by Astute Medical. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01573962).
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 02/2014; · 11.04 Impact Factor
  • H Bryant Nguyen, Vi Am Dinh
    Chest 06/2013; 143(6):1521-3. · 5.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Improving time to diagnosis and intervention has positively impacted outcomes in acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and trauma through elucidating the early pathogenesis of those diseases. This insight may partly explain the futility of time-insensitive immunotherapy trials for severe sepsis and septic shock. The aim of this study was to examine the early natural history of circulatory biomarker activity in sepsis, relative to previous animal and human outcome trials. We conducted a literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to identify outcome trials targeting biomarkers with emphasis on the timing of therapy. These findings were compared with the biomarker activity observed over the first 72 h of hospital presentation in a cohort of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Biomarker levels in animal and human research models are elevated within 30 min after exposure to an inflammatory septic stimulus. Consistent with these findings, the biomarker cascade is activated at the most proximal point of hospital presentation in our patient cohort. These circulatory biomarkers overlap; some have bimodal patterns and generally peak between 3 and 36 h while diminishing over the subsequent 72 h of observation. When this is taken into account, prior outcome immunotherapy trials have generally enrolled patients after peak circulatory biomarker concentrations. In previous immunotherapy sepsis trials, intervention was delayed after the optimal window of peak biomarker activity. As a result, future studies need to recalibrate the timing of enrollment and administration of immunotherapy agents that still may hold great promise for this deadly disease.
    Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 02/2013; 39(2):127-37. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In sepsis, the vitamin D active metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) may play a crucial role by its action to produce cathelicidin and improve endothelial barrier function, such that a deficiency in 1,25(OH)2D is associated with poor outcome. To test our hypothesis, we performed analysis of stored plasma samples from a prospective observational study in 91 patients with sepsis, age of 59.1+/-2.0 years, 52.7% females, and 11.0% deaths at 30 days. Vitamin D status, including 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH)2D), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), were measured daily over 3 days after hospital admission. At baseline, 1,25(OH)2D was significantly different between survivors vs. non-survivors. But there was no significant difference in 25(OH)D, 24,25(OH)2D, and PTH. In a multivariable binomial logistic regression model, age, total calcium and 1,25(OH)2D were significant predictors of 30-day mortality. Kaplan Meier analysis showed that patients with mean 1,25(OH)2D measured over 3 days of < = 13.6 pg/mL had 57.1% 30-day survival compared to 91.7% in patients with 1,25 (OH)2D level >13.6 pg/mL (p<0.01). From repeated measures regression analysis, there was significant increase in 1,25(OH)2D for increases in 25(OH)D in both survivors and non-survivors. However, compared to survivors, the low 25(OH)D in non-survivors was insufficient to account for the larger decrease in 1,25(OH)2D, indicating a dysfunctional 1α-hydroxylase. Additionally, there was a significant negative correlation between PTH and 1,25(OH)2D in both survivors and non-survivors, suggesting a severe impairment in the effect of PTH to increase renal 1α-hydroxylase activity. In conclusion, low 1,25(OH)2D levels are associated with increased 30-day mortality in sepsis patients, likely due to impaired 25(OH)D hydroxylation and PTH insensitivity. Our data also suggest that the active metabolite 1,25(OH)2D may be an important therapeutic target in the design of sepsis clinical trials.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(5):e64348. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: : The primary objective of this study was to identify which patient demographic, patient health, and hospital characteristics were associated with in-hospital mortality. A secondary objective was to determine the relative influence of these characteristics on mortality. : Public-use data for 2005-2010 were used in this retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of discharges from nonfederal, general acute hospitals in California. A staged logistic regression approach was used to examine the relative influence of variables associated with in-hospital mortality. : A total of 1,213,219 patient discharges for adults (aged ≥18 yrs) having International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis and procedure codes indicating severe sepsis. : None. : Patient demographics (age, gender, race, ethnicity, and payer category), patient health status (acute transfer, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index, and organ failures), and hospital characteristics (ownership type, teaching status, bed size, annual patient days, acute discharges, emergency department visits, inpatient surgeries, severe sepsis as a percentage of all discharges, and year) were obtained from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 17.8%. There was a steady annual increase in the number of sepsis discharges, but a decrease in mortality throughout the study period. Mortality increased with age and was associated with white race, and Medicaid (Medi-Cal) and private insurance. Patient health status additionally explained inpatient mortality. Hospital volume measures were statistically significant in regression analysis, whereas static structural measures were not. There were modest associations between measures of annual treatment volume and likelihood of inpatient mortality, notably decreasing likelihood with more acute discharges and with greater severe sepsis volume. : Although patient demographics and health status are the most important predictors of in-hospital mortality of patients with severe sepsis, hospital characteristics do play a substantial role. Findings regarding hospital volume can be used to improve processes and improve patient outcomes.
    Critical care medicine 08/2012; 40(11):2960-6. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of implementing sepsis bundle in multiple Asian countries, having 'team' vs. 'non-team' models of patient care. DESIGN: /st> Prospective cohort study. SETTING: /st> Eight urban hospitals, five countries in Asia. PARTICIPANTS: /st> Adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. INTERVENTIONS: /st> Implementation was divided into six quartiles: Baseline, Education and four Quality Improvement quartiles. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: /st> Quarterly bundle compliance and in-hospital mortality with respect to bundle completion and implementation model. METHODS: /st> In the team model, the implementation was championed by intensivists, where the bundle was completed in the intensive care unit. The non-team model led by emergency physicians completed the bundle in the emergency department as part of standard care. RESULTS: /st> Five hundred and fifty-six patients were enrolled. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 29.9%, and 67.1% of the patients had septic shock. Compliance to the bundle was 13.3, 26.9, 37.5, 45.9, 48.8 and 54.5% over the six quartiles of implementation (P < 0.01). With team model, compliance increased from 37.5% baseline to 88.2% in the sixth quartile (P < 0.01), whereas hospitals with a non-team model increased compliance from 5.2 to 39.5% (P < 0.01). Crude in-hospital mortality was better in the patients who received the entire bundle (24.5 vs. 32.7%, P = 0.04). Bundle completion was associated with crude in-hospital mortality reduction (odds ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.45-0.99), but this survival benefit disappeared after adjustment for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS: /st> Through education and quality improvement efforts, initially low sepsis bundle compliance was improved in Asia. A team model was more effective in achieving bundle compliance compared with a non-team model.
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care 08/2012; 24(5):452-462. · 1.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Noninvasive technology may assist the emergency department (ED) physician in determining the hemodynamic status in critically ill patients. The objective of our study was to show that ED physicians can accurately measure cardiac index (CI) by performing a bedside focused cardiac ultrasound examination. METHODS: A convenience sample of adult subjects were prospectively enrolled. Cardiac index, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), stroke volume index, and heart rate were obtained by trained ED physicians and a certified cardiac sonographer. The primary outcome was percent of optimal LVOT diameter and VTI measurements as verified by an expert cardiologist. RESULTS: One hundred patients were enrolled, with obtainable CI measurements in 97 patients. Cardiac index, LVOT diameter, VTI, stroke volume index, and heart rate measurements by ED physician were 2.42 ± 0.70 L min(-1) m(-2), 2.07 ± 0.22 cm, 18.30 ± 3.71 cm, 32.34 ± 7.92 mL beat(-1) m(-2), and 75.32 ± 13.45 beats/min, respectively. Measurements of LVOT diameter by ED physicians and sonographer were optimal in 90.0% (95% confidence interval, 82.6%-94.5) and 91.3% (73.2%-97.6%) of patients, respectively. Optimal VTI measurements were obtained in 78.4% (69.2%-85.4%) and 78.3% (58.1%-90.3%) of patients, respectively. In 23 patients, the correlation (r) for CI between ED physician and sonographer was 0.82 (0.60-0.92), with bias and limits of agreement of -0.11 (-1.06 to 0.83) L min(-1) m(-2) and percent difference of 12.4% ± 10.1%. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency department ED physicians can accurately measure CI using standard bedside ultrasound. A focused ultrasound cardiac examination to derive CI has potential use in the management of critical ill patients in the ED.
    The American journal of emergency medicine 07/2012; · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    H Bryant Nguyen
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    ABSTRACT: Lactic acid was first discovered in human blood in 1843. Since then it has been used as a prognosticator of outcome in critical illness. Regardless of its etiology, lactate's presence and trend over time have been shown to be independently associated with mortality. Two dynamic lactate measures, the time-weighted average lactate and the absolute change in lactate over the first 24 hours in the ICU, were recently shown to be better than static lactate measurements in predicting hospital and ICU deaths.
    Critical care (London, England) 12/2011; 15(6):1016. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spontaneous aortic dissection in pregnancy is rare and life threatening for both the mother and the fetus. Most commonly, it is associated with connective tissue disorders, cardiac valve variants, or trauma. We present the case of a 23-year-old previously healthy woman, 36 weeks pregnant with a syncopal episode after dyspnea and vomiting. She subsequently developed cardiac arrest and underwent aggressive resuscitation, emergent thoracotomy, and cesarean delivery without recovery. On autopsy, she was found to have an aortic dissection of the ascending aorta. This case is presented to raise awareness and review the literature and the clinical approach to critical care for pregnant patients.
    The western journal of emergency medicine 11/2011; 12(4):571-4.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to examine the performance of the Predisposition, Insult/Infection, Response, and Organ dysfunction (PIRO) model compared with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) scoring systems in predicting in-hospital mortality for patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with severe sepsis or septic shock. This study was an analysis of a prospectively maintained registry including adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock meeting criteria for early goal-directed therapy and the severe sepsis resuscitation bundle over a 6-year period. The registry contains data on patient demographics, sepsis category, vital signs, laboratory values, ED length of stay, hospital length of stay, physiologic scores, and outcome status. The discrimination and calibration characteristics of PIRO, APACHE II, and MEDS were analyzed. Five-hundred forty-one patients with age 63.5 ± 18.5 years were enrolled, 61.9% in septic shock, 46.9% blood-culture positive, and 31.8% in-hospital mortality. Median (25th and 75th percentile) PIRO, APACHE II, and MEDS scores were 6 (5 and 8), 28 (22 and 34), and 12 (9 and 15), with predicted mortalities of 48.5% (40.1 and 63.9), 66.0% (42.0 and 83.0), and 16.0% (9.0 and 39.0), respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PIRO was 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.75); APACHE II, 0.71 (0.66-0.76); and MEDS, 0.63 (0.60-0.70). The standardized mortality ratio was 0.70 (0.08-1.41), 0.70 (-0.46 to 1.80), and 4.00 (-8.53 to 16.62), respectively. Actual mortality significantly increased with increasing PIRO score in patients with APACHE II 25 or more (P < .01). The PIRO, APACHE II, and MEDS have variable abilities to early discriminate and estimate in-hospital mortality of patients presenting to the ED meeting criteria for early goal-directed therapy and the severe sepsis resuscitation bundle. The PIRO may provide additional risk stratification in patients with APACHE II 25 or more. More studies are required to evaluate the clinical applicability of PIRO in high-risk patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.
    Journal of critical care 10/2011; 27(4):362-9. · 2.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines has been associated with improved outcome in patients with severe sepsis. Resolution of lactate elevations or lactate clearance has also been shown to be associated with outcome. The purpose of the present study was to examine the compliance and effectiveness of the SSC resuscitation bundle with the addition of lactate clearance. This was a prospective cohort study over 18 months in eight tertiary-care medical centers in Asia, enrolling adult patients meeting criteria for the SSC resuscitation bundle in the emergency department. Compliance and outcome results of a multi-disciplinary program to implement the Primary SSC Bundle with the addition of lactate clearance (Modified SSC Bundle) were examined. The implementation period was divided into quartiles, including baseline, education and four quality improvement phases. A total of 556 patients were enrolled, with median (25th to 75th percentile) age 63 (50 to 74) years, lactate 4.1 (2.2 to 6.3) mmol/l, central venous pressure 10 (7 to 13) mmHg, mean arterial pressure (MAP) 70 (56 to 86) mmHg, and central venous oxygen saturation 77 (69 to 82)%. Completion of the Primary SSC Bundle over the six quartiles was 13.3, 26.9, 37.5, 45.9, 48.8, and 54.5%, respectively (P <0.01). The Modified SSC Bundle was completed in 10.2, 23.1, 31.7, 40.0, 42.5, and 43.6% patients, respectively (P <0.01). The ratio of the relative risk of death reduction for the Modified SSC Bundle compared with the Primary SSC Bundle was 1.94 (95% confidence interval = 1.45 to 39.1). Logistic regression modeling showed that the bundle items of fluid bolus given, achieve MAP >65 mmHg by 6 hours, and lactate clearance were independently associated with decreased mortality - having odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) 0.47 (0.23 to 0.96), 0.20 (0.07 to 0.55), and 0.32 (0.19 to 0.55), respectively. The addition of lactate clearance to the SSC resuscitation bundle is associated with improved mortality. In our study patient population with optimized baseline central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation, the bundle items of fluid bolus administration, achieving MAP >65 mmHg, and lactate clearance were independent predictors of outcome.
    Critical care (London, England) 09/2011; 15(5):R229. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medical simulation has been used to teach critical illness in a variety of settings. This study examined the effect of didactic lectures compared with simulated case scenario in a medical simulation course on the early management of severe sepsis. A prospective multicentre randomised study was performed enrolling resident physicians in emergency medicine from four hospitals in Asia. Participants were randomly assigned to a course that included didactic lectures followed by a skills workshop and simulated case scenario (lecture-first) or to a course that included a skills workshop and simulated case scenario followed by didactic lectures (simulation-first). A pre-test was given to the participants at the beginning of the course, post-test 1 was given after the didactic lectures or simulated case scenario depending on the study group assignment, then a final post-test 2 was given at the end of the course. Performance on the simulated case scenario was evaluated with a performance task checklist. 98 participants were enrolled in the study. Post-test 2 scores were significantly higher than pre-test scores in all participants (80.8 ± 12.0% vs 65.4 ± 12.2%, p<0.01). There was no difference in pre-test scores between the two study groups. The lecture-first group had significantly higher post-test 1 scores than the simulation-first group (78.8 ± 10.6% vs 71.6 ± 12.6%, p<0.01). There was no difference in post-test 2 scores between the two groups. The simulated case scenario task performance completion was 90.8% (95% CI 86.6% to 95.0%) in the lecture-first group compared with 83.8% (95% CI 79.5% to 88.1%) in the simulation-first group (p=0.02). A medical simulation course can improve resident physician knowledge in the early management of severe sepsis. Such a course should include a comprehensive curriculum that includes didactic lectures followed by simulation experience.
    Emergency Medicine Journal 07/2011; 29(7):559-64. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Myocardial dysfunction is an important aspect of sepsis pathophysiology. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a neurohormone released from the ventricles in response to myocardial stretch and volume overload. The authors hypothesized that an elevated BNP in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected sepsis are at increased risk for development of adverse events. This was a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study in 10 EDs. Patients were eligible if they were older than 18 years, had two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and had suspected infection or a serum lactate level > 2.5 mmol/L. Patients were excluded if they were pregnant, had do-not-attempt-resuscitation status, sustained a cardiac arrest prior to hospital arrival, had known chronic renal insufficiency, or were on dialysis. BNP levels were obtained at arrival. The primary outcome was a composite of severe sepsis, septic shock within 72 hours, or in-hospital mortality. There were 825 patients enrolled (mean ± standard deviation [SD] age = 53.5 ± 19.6 years; 51% were female and 37% were African American). The area under the curve (AUC) for BNP to predict the triple composite outcome was 0.69, and the optimal cut-point of BNP was 49 pg/mL. Patients with a BNP > 49 pg/mL had a greater mortality rate (11.6% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.0001), a greater risk of development of severe sepsis (67.7% vs. 36.8%; p = 0.0001) and septic shock (51.7% vs. 26.4%; p = 0.0001), and a higher rate of the triple composite outcome (69% vs. 37%; unadjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6 to 2.1; p < 0.001). The sensitivity was 63% (95% CI = 58% to 67%), specificity was 69% (95% CI = 65% to 73%), negative predictive value (NPV) was 63% (95% CI = 58% to 67%), and positive predictive value (PPV) was 69% (95% CI = 65% to 74%). In multivariate modeling, after adjusting for age, sex, heart rate, white blood cell count, and creatinine, an elevated BNP was associated with increased odds of having the composite outcome. The outcome was similar in the subset of patients who did not have severe sepsis or septic shock upon arrival. In patients who present to the ED with SIRS criteria and suspected infection, an elevated BNP is associated with a worse prognosis but has limited diagnostic utility.
    Academic Emergency Medicine 02/2011; 18(2):219-22. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest generally have poor outcomes. Guidelines for treatment can be complicated and difficult to implement. This study examined the feasibility of implementing a care bundle including therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and early hemodynamic optimization for comatose patients with return of spontaneous circulation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The study included patients over a 2-year period in the ED and intensive care unit of an academic tertiary-care medical center. The first year (prebundle) provided a historical control, followed by a prospective observational period of bundle implementation during the second year. The bundle elements included (a) TH initiated; (b) central venous pressure/central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in 2 h; (c) target temperature in 4 h; (d) central venous pressure greater than 12 mmHg in 6 h; (e) MAP greater than 65 mmHg in 6 h; (f) central venous oxygen saturation greater than 70% in 6 h; (g) TH maintained for 24 h; and (h) decreasing lactate in 24 h. Fifty-five patients were enrolled, 26 patients in the prebundle phase and 29 patients in the bundle phase. Seventy-seven percent of bundle elements were completed during the bundle phase. In-hospital mortality in bundle compared with prebundle patients was 55.2% vs. 69.2% (P = 0.29). In the bundle patients, those patients who received all elements of the care bundle had mortality 33.3% compared with 60.9% in those receiving some of the bundle elements (P = 0.22). Bundle patients tended to achieve good neurologic outcome compared with prebundle patients, Cerebral Performance Category 1 or 2 in 31 vs. 12% patients, respectively (P = 0.08). Our study demonstrated that a post-cardiac arrest care bundle that incorporates TH and early hemodynamic optimization can be implemented in the ED and intensive care unit collaboratively and can achieve similar clinical benefits compared with those observed in previous clinical trials.
    Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 11/2010; 35(4):360-6. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring may facilitate resuscitation in critically ill patients. Validation studies examining a transcutaneous Doppler ultrasound technology, USCOM-1A, using pulmonary artery catheter as the reference standard showed varying results. In this study, we compared non-invasive cardiac index (CI) measurements by USCOM-1A with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). This study was a prospective, observational cohort study at a university tertiary-care emergency department, enrolling a convenience sample of adult and pediatric patients. Paired measures of CI, stroke volume index (SVI), aortic outflow tract diameter (OTD), velocity time integral (VTI) were obtained using USCOM-1A and TTE. Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were performed. One-hundred and sixteen subjects were enrolled, with obtainable USCOM-1A CI measurements for 99 subjects (55 adults age 50 +/- 20 years and 44 children age 11 +/- 4 years) in the final analysis. Cardiac, gastrointestinal and infectious illnesses were the most common presenting diagnostic categories. The reference standard TTE measurements of CI, SVI, OTD, and VTI in all subjects were 3.08 +/- 1.18 L/min/m(2), 37.10 +/- 10.91 mL/m(2), 1.92 +/- 0.36 cm, and 20.36 +/- 4.53 cm, respectively. Intra-operator reliability of USCOM-1A CI measurements showed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.79, with 11 +/- 22% difference between repeated measures. The bias and limits of agreement of USCOM-1A compared to TTE CI were 0.58 (-1.48 to 2.63) L/min/m(2). The percent difference in CI measurements with USCOM-1A was 31 +/- 28% relative to TTE measurements. The USCOM-1A hemodynamic monitoring technology showed poor correlation and agreement to standard transthoracic echocardiography measures of cardiac function. The utility of USCOM-1A in the management of critically ill patients remains to be determined.
    International Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 06/2010; 24(3):237-47.
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    ABSTRACT: We assess the diagnostic accuracy of plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) to predict acute kidney injury in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected sepsis. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective observational study of a convenience sample of patients from 10 academic medical center EDs. Inclusion criteria were adult patients aged 18 years or older, with suspected infection or a serum lactate level greater than 2.5 mmol/L; 2 or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria; and a subsequent serum creatinine level obtained within 12 to 72 hours of enrollment. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, do-not-resuscitate status, cardiac arrest, or dialysis dependency. NGAL was measured in plasma collected at ED presentation. Acute kidney injury was defined as an increase in serum creatinine measurement of greater than 0.5 mg/dL during 72 hours. There were 661 patient enrolled, with 24 cases (3.6%) of acute kidney injury that developed within 72 hours after ED presentation. Median plasma NGAL levels were 134 ng/mL (interquartile range 57 to 277 ng/mL) in patients without acute kidney injury and 456 ng/mL (interquartile range 296 to 727 ng/mL) in patients with acute kidney injury. Plasma NGAL concentrations of greater than 150 ng/mL were 96% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 79% to 100%) and 51% (95% CI 47% to 55%) specific for acute kidney injury. In comparison, to achieve equivalent sensitivity with initial serum creatinine level at ED presentation required a cutoff of 0.7 mg/dL and resulted in specificity of 17% (95% CI 14% to 20%). In this preliminary investigation, increased plasma NGAL concentrations measured on presentation to the ED in patients with suspected sepsis were associated with the development of acute kidney injury. Our findings support NGAL as a promising new biomarker for acute kidney injury; however, further research is warranted.
    Annals of emergency medicine 04/2010; 56(1):52-59.e1. · 4.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence-based therapies for severe sepsis include early antibiotics, early goal-directed therapy, corticosteroids, recombinant human activated protein C, glucose control, and lung protective strategies. The objective of this study was to analyze methods, challenges, and outcomes observed by hospitals that implemented a hospital-wide sepsis management protocol incorporating evidence-based therapies. Methods: In a cross-sectional multi-center telephone survey over a 4-month period, clinicians (participants) responsible for developing a hospital sepsis protocol were questioned regarding its development and outcomes. Participants completing surveys represented 40 hospitals (20 academic and 20 community). Twenty-seven percent of protocol champions were Emergency physicians or nurses. Sixty-three percent reported protocol development time of 6-12 months. Eighty-eight percent of participants reported protocol initiation in the Emergency Department. Three participants reported hiring a nurse educator to implement the protocol. Ninety-five percent of participants measure lactate as part of patient screening. Protocol therapies reported included early antibiotics (98%), early goal directed-therapy (EGDT) (98%), corticosteroids (80%), and activated protein C (73%). Contributions to success included having a protocol champion (85%) and sepsis education program (65%). Twenty-one participants had recorded patient-level data, totaling 2319 protocol patients, compared to 1719 non-protocol patients, with in-hospital mortality of 23% and 44%, respectively. Implementation of a sepsis management protocol incorporating evidence-based therapies can be accomplished in both academic and community hospitals, with minimal additional staffing. The presence of a protocol champion and education program is crucial to success, and may result in improved patient outcome.
    Journal of Emergency Medicine 02/2010; 38(2):122-30, quiz 130-2. · 1.33 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
152.35 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2014
    • Loma Linda University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Emergency Medicine
      Loma Linda, California, United States
  • 2011
    • Chang Gung Memorial Hospital
      • Department of Emergency Medicine
      Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 2008–2010
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      • Department of Emergency Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2004–2006
    • Henry Ford Hospital
      • Department of Emergency Medicine
      Detroit, MI, United States