Roy Cook

The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

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Publications (3)15.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Home-LITE compared long-term treatment at home with tinzaparin or usual care in terms of efficacy, safety, patients' treatment satisfaction, incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome, and associated venous leg ulcers. This multicenter, randomized, controlled trial enrolled 480 patients with documented, acute, proximal deep vein thrombosis. Patients received tinzaparin 175 IU/kg subcutaneously once daily for 12 weeks, or tinzaparin for >or=5 days plus oral warfarin, commenced on day 1, international normalized ratio-adjusted, and continued for >or=12 weeks ("usual care"). Patients received 1 in-clinic injection, then home treatment. The rate of recurrent venous thromboembolism at 12 weeks was 3.3% in both groups (absolute difference 0%; 95% confidence interval -3.2-3.2), and at 1 year was 10.4%/8.3% in the tinzaparin/usual-care groups, respectively (difference 2.1%; 95% confidence interval -3.1-7.3). There were no between-group differences in deaths at 12 weeks or 1 year, or bleeding at 12 weeks. Patients in the tinzaparin group expressed significantly greater treatment satisfaction (P = .0024), particularly regarding freedom from the inconvenience of blood monitoring; were less likely to report signs/symptoms of post-thrombotic syndrome (individual odds ratios 0.66 to 0.91, overall odds ratio 0.77, P = .001); and reported fewer leg ulcers at 12 weeks: 1 (0.5%) versus 8 (4.1%) (P = .02) with usual care. Long-term home treatment with tinzaparin or usual care resulted in similar rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism, death, and bleeding. The significantly lower incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome and leg ulcers observed in the tinzaparin group is a potentially important benefit and deserves further study.
    The American journal of medicine 08/2009; 122(8):762-769.e3. · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A substantial clinical need exists for an alternate to vitamin K antagonists for treating deep vein thrombosis in many patients. Long-term low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), body-weight adjusted, avoids anticoagulant monitoring and may be associated with less bleeding. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of long-term LMWH compared with vitamin K antagonist therapy in a broad spectrum of patients with proximal vein thrombosis. We performed a multicenter, randomized, open-label clinical trial using objective outcome measures comparing therapy for 3 months. Outcomes were assessed at 3 and 12 months. Of 737 patients, 18 of 369 receiving tinzaparin (4.9%) had recurrent venous thromboembolism at 3 months compared with 21 of 368 (5.7%) receiving usual care (absolute difference, -0.8%, 95% confidence interval -4.1-2.4). Hemorrhagic complications occurred less frequently in the LMWH group largely because of less minor bleeding: 48 of 369 patients (13.0%) versus 73 of 368 patients (19.8%) receiving usual-care anticoagulation (absolute difference -6.8%; P = .011; risk ratio = 0.66). New major bleeding events ceased early (by day 23, P = .034) for patients receiving LMWH but persisted throughout the study treatment interval for patients receiving vitamin K antagonist therapy. No mortality advantage was shown for LMWH. Our study shows that LMWH is similar in effectiveness to the usual-care vitamin K antagonist treatment for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism in a broad spectrum of patients. It causes less harm and enhances the clinicians' therapeutic options for patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis. Our findings reported here suggest the possibility of a broader role for long-term LMWH in selected patients.
    The American journal of medicine 02/2007; 120(1):72-82. · 5.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A substantial clinical need exists for an alternative to vitamin K antagonists for treating deep-vein thrombosis in cancer patients who are at high risk of both recurrent venous thromboembolism and bleeding. Low-molecular-weight heparin, body-weight adjusted, avoids anticoagulant monitoring and has been shown to be more effective than vitamin-K-antagonist therapy. Subjects were patients with cancer and acute symptomatic proximal-vein thrombosis. We performed a multi-centre randomized, open-label clinical trial using objective outcome measures comparing long-term therapeutic tinzaparin subcutaneously once daily with usual-care long-term vitamin-K-antagonist therapy for 3 months. Outcomes were assessed at 3 and 12 months. Of 200 patients, 100 received tinzaparin and 100 received usual care. At 12 months, the usual-care group had an excess of recurrent venous thromboembolism; 16 of 100 (16%) versus 7 of 100 (7%) receiving low-molecular-weight heparin (P=.044; risk ratio=.44; absolute difference -9.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], -21.7 to -0.7). Bleeding, largely minor, occurred in 27 patients (27%) receiving tinzaparin and 24 patients (24%) receiving usual care (absolute difference -3.0; 95% CI, -9.1 to 15.1). In patients without additional risk factors for bleeding at the time of randomization, major bleeding occurred in 0 of 51 patients (0%) receiving tinzaparin and 1 of 48 patients (2.1%) receiving usual care. Mortality at 1 year was high, reflecting the severity of the cancers; 47% in each group died. Our findings confirm the limited but benchmark data in the literature that long-term low-molecular-weight heparin is more effective than vitamin-K-antagonist therapy for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer and proximal venous thrombosis.
    The American journal of medicine 01/2007; 119(12):1062-72. · 5.30 Impact Factor