Kirsten Beyer

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

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Publications (166)797.06 Total impact

  • B. Niggemann, K. Beyer
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    ABSTRACT: Elicitors of anaphylactic reactions are any sources of protein with allergenic capacity, such as foods, drugs, insect venoms, pollen, animal dander, occupational allergens, or seminal fluid. However, not all allergic reactions end up in the most severe form of anaphylaxis. Accompanying factors may explain, why some conditions lead to anaphylaxis while in other cases the allergen is tolerated.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Allergy 10/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Oral challenges are the gold standard in food allergy diagnostic, but time consuming. Aim of the study was to investigate the role of peanut- and hazelnut-component-specific IgE in the diagnostics of peanut and hazelnut allergy and to identify cut-off levels to make some challenges superfluous.Methods In a prospective and multicenter study, children with suspected peanut or hazelnut allergy underwent oral challenges. Specific IgE to peanut, hazelnut and their components (Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 8, Cor a 1, Cor a 8, Cor a 9, and Cor a 14) were determined by ImmunoCAP-FEIA.Results210 children were challenged orally with peanut and 143 with hazelnut. 43% of the patients had a positive peanut and 31% a positive hazelnut challenge. With an area under the curve of 0.92 and 0.89 respectively, Ara h 2 and Cor a 14-specific IgE discriminated between allergic and tolerant children better than peanut or hazelnut-specific IgE. For the first time, probability curves for peanut and hazelnut components have been calculated. A 90% probability for a positive peanut or hazelnut challenge was estimated for Ara h 2-specific IgE at 14.4 kU/L and for Cor a 14-specific IgE at 47.8 kU/L. A 95% probability could only be estimated for Ara h 2 at 42.2 kU/L.Conclusions Ara h 2- and Cor a 14-specific IgE are useful to estimate the probability for a positive challenge outcome in the diagnostic workup of peanut or hazelnut allergy making some food challenges superfluous.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Allergy 10/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
  • Lars Lange, Kirsten Beyer, Jörg Kleine-Tebbe
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    ABSTRACT: Allergische Reaktionen gegen Erdnuss (Arachis hypogaea, Ara h) beruhen auf IgE-vermittelten Sensibilisierungen gegen verschiedene Proteine. Ihre Stabilität und relativer Anteil in der Erdnuss bestimmen das Risiko für bedrohliche Reaktionen. Risikosensibilisierungen gegen Samenspeicherproteine (S2-Albumine [Ara h 2, 6 und 7] > andere Speicherproteine [Ara h 1 und 3] > Oleosine [Ara h 10 und 11]) lassen sich von Sensibilisierungen gegen das Lipidtransfer-Protein (Ara h 9) mit mittlerem Risiko und von Kreuzsensibilisierungen gegen Bet-v-1-homologes PR-10 Protein (Ara h 8) und gegen Pro filin (Ara h 5) mit niedrigem Risiko abgrenzen. Ein gezielter Immunglobulin-E (IgE)-Test, z. B. gegen Ara h 2 bei Verdacht oder zum Ausschluss einer systemischen Reaktion, kann die Risikoeinschätzung erleichtern. Die Ergebnisse sind allerdings nur bei korrespondierenden Symptomen klinisch relevant. IgE-Sensibilisierungen gegen Erdnussextrakt ohne bedrohliche Reaktionen beruhen hierzulande hau fig auf Bet-v-1-bedingten Kreuzreaktionen (bei Birkenpollenallergikern), kreuzreaktiven p flanzlichen Kohlehydrat-Epitopen (CCD) oder Pro filinsensibilisierungen. Im Zweifelsfall lässt sich die klinische Relevanz nur durch eine orale Provokation sichern, zumal noch nicht alle Erdnussallergene (z. B. Oleosine) zur Diagnostik verfügbar sind.
    Allergo Journal International. 08/2014; 23:158-63.
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    ABSTRACT: Occurrence, elicitors and treatment of severe allergic reactions are recognised and reported differently between countries. We aimed to collect standardised data throughout Europe on anaphylaxis referred for diagnosis and counselling.
    Allergy 07/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Food allergy can result in considerable morbidity, impact negatively on quality of life, and prove costly in terms of medical care. These guidelines have been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Guidelines for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Group, building on previous EAACI position papers on adverse reaction to foods and three recent systematic reviews on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of food allergy, and provide evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of food allergy. While the primary audience is allergists, this document is relevant for all other healthcare professionals, including primary care physicians, and pediatric and adult specialists, dieticians, pharmacists and paramedics. Our current understanding of the manifestations of food allergy, the role of diagnostic tests, and the effective management of patients of all ages with food allergy is presented. The acute management of non-life-threatening reactions is covered in these guidelines, but for guidance on the emergency management of anaphylaxis, readers are referred to the related EAACI Anaphylaxis Guidelines.
    Allergy 06/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anaphylaxis is a clinical emergency, and all healthcare professionals should be familiar with its recognition and acute and ongoing management. These guidelines have been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) Taskforce on Anaphylaxis. They aim to provide evidence-based recommendations for the recognition, risk factor assessment, and the management of patients who are at risk of, are experiencing, or have experienced anaphylaxis. While the primary audience is allergists, these guidelines are also relevant to all other healthcare professionals. The development of these guidelines has been underpinned by two systematic reviews of the literature, both on the epidemiology and on clinical management of anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening condition whose clinical diagnosis is based on recognition of a constellation of presenting features. First-line treatment for anaphylaxis is intramuscular adrenaline. Useful second-line interventions may include removing the trigger where possible, calling for help, correct positioning of the patient, high-flow oxygen, intravenous fluids, inhaled short-acting bronchodilators, and nebulized adrenaline. Discharge arrangements should involve an assessment of the risk of further reactions, a management plan with an anaphylaxis emergency action plan, and, where appropriate, prescribing an adrenaline auto-injector. If an adrenaline auto-injector is prescribed, education on when and how to use the device should be provided. Specialist follow-up is essential to investigate possible triggers, to perform a comprehensive risk assessment, and to prevent future episodes by developing personalized risk reduction strategies including, where possible, commencing allergen immunotherapy. Training for the patient and all caregivers is essential. There are still many gaps in the evidence base for anaphylaxis.
    Allergy 06/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Threshold levels for peanut allergy determined by using oral challenges are important for the food industry with regard to allergen labeling. Moreover, the utility of biological markers in predicting threshold levels is uncertain. We sought to use a modified oral food challenge regimen that might determine threshold levels for peanut allergy mimicking a more real-life exposure and to correlate the eliciting dose (ED) and severity of clinical reaction in children with peanut allergy with B-cell, T-cell, and effector cell markers. A modified food challenge procedure with doses scheduled 2 hours apart was used in 63 children with peanut allergy. All children received a maximum of 8 semi-log increasing titration steps of roasted peanuts ranging from 3 to 4500 mg of peanut protein until objective allergic reactions occurred. Severity of symptoms was graded from I to V. Biological markers were measured before challenge. Forty-five of 63 patients showed objective symptoms after greater than 30 minutes, with a median latency of clinical reaction of 55 minutes. By using a log-normal dose-distribution model, the ED5 was calculated to be 1.95 mg of peanut protein. The ED was significantly and inversely correlated with peanut- and Ara h 2-specific IgE levels, skin prick test responses, basophil activation, and TH2 cytokine production by PBMCs. Symptom severity did not correlate with any of the markers or the ED. This modified food challenge procedure might better reflect threshold levels for peanut allergy than the standard procedure because most of the patients reacted at a time interval of greater than 30 minutes. By using this model, threshold levels, but not severity, could be correlated with biological markers.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 05/2014; · 12.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Assessing maternal dietary habits across Europe during pregnancy in relation to their national pregnancy recommendations. A collaborative, multi-centre, birth cohort study in nine European countries was conducted as part of European Union funded EuroPrevall project. Standardised baseline questionnaire data included details of food intake, nutritional supplement use, exposure to cigarette smoke during pregnancy and socio-demographic data. Pregnancy recommendations were collected from all nine countries from the appropriate national organisations. The most commonly taken supplement in pregnancy was folic acid (55.6 % Lithuania-97.8 % Spain) and was favoured by older, well-educated mothers. Vitamin D supplementation across the cohort was very poor (0.3 % Spain-5.1 % Lithuania). There were significant differences in foods consumed in different countries during pregnancy e.g. only 2.7 % Dutch mothers avoided eating peanut, while 44.4 % of British mothers avoided it. Some countries have minimal pregnancy recommendations i.e. Lithuania, Poland and Spain while others have similar, very specific recommendations i.e. UK, the Netherlands, Iceland, Greece. Allergy specific recommendations were associated with food avoidance during pregnancy [relative rate (RR) 1.18 95 % CI 0.02-1.37]. Nutritional supplement recommendations were also associated with avoidance (RR 1.08, 1.00-1.16). Maternal dietary habits and the use of dietary supplements during pregnancy vary significantly across Europe and in some instances may be influenced by national recommendations.
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 04/2014; · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Food allergy can have significant effects on morbidity and quality of life and can be costly in terms of medical visits and treatments. There is therefore considerable interest in generating efficient approaches that may reduce the risk of developing food allergy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Taskforce on Prevention and is part of the EAACI Guidelines for Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis. It aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for primary prevention of food allergy. A wide range of antenatal, perinatal, neonatal, and childhood strategies were identified and their effectiveness assessed and synthesized in a systematic review.Based on this evidence, families can be provided with evidence-based advice about preventing food allergy, particularly for infants at high risk for development of allergic disease. The advice for all mothers includes a normal diet without restrictions during pregnancy and lactation. For all infants, exclusive breastfeeding is recommended for at least first 4–6 months of life. If breastfeeding is insufficient or not possible, infants at high-risk can be recommended a hypoallergenic formula with a documented preventive effect for the first 4 months. There is no need to avoid introducing complementary foods beyond 4 months, and currently, the evidence does not justify recommendations about either withholding or encouraging exposure to potentially allergenic foods after 4 months once weaning has commenced, irrespective of atopic heredity. There is no evidence to support the use of prebiotics or probiotics for food allergy prevention.
    Allergy 04/2014; · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The gold standard in the diagnosis of food allergy is the double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenge (DBPCFC). During this challenge, patients receive the allergenic food and placebo on separate randomized days, while being monitored for clinical reactions. Interestingly, some reactions are assessed as positive although the patients had received placebo. The aim of our study was to analyze incidence and characteristics of positive placebo reactions during DBPCFCs. In food-allergic children, we retrospectively analyzed positive placebo reactions in DBPCFCs in 740 placebo challenges in our department. Individual characteristics were compared, such as age or IgE levels, as well as clinical symptoms. 2.8% (21 out of 740) of all placebo challenges were assessed as positive. Young children (age <= 1.5 yrs) had more (p = .047) positive placebo challenges (4.0%) compared to older children (age > 1.5 yrs; 1.5%). Children with positive placebo challenges had higher levels of total IgE (median 201 kU/l) compared to negatively classified children (median 110 kU/l). In children with positive placebo reactions, skin symptoms were observed significantly more often, with a worsening of atopic eczema (AE) as the most reported symptom. Placebo reactions in DBPCFC are not common. Worsening of AE is the most frequent clinical reaction associated with positive placebo challenges, and young children (age <= 1.5 yrs) seem to be affected more often. Therefore - contrary to current recommendations - DBPCFC tests should be considered in infants and young children, especially those with a history of AE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 01/2014; · 4.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Anaphylaxis is the most severe manifestation of a mast cell–dependent immediate reaction and may be fatal. According to data from the Berlin region, its inci-dence is 2–3 cases per 100 000 persons per year.
    Deutsches Ärzteblatt International 01/2014; · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Food allergy appears to be on the rise with the current mainstay of treatment centred on allergen avoidance. Mandatory allergen labelling has improved the safety of food for allergic consumers. However an additional form of voluntary labelling (termed precautionary allergen labelling) has evolved on a wide range of packaged goods, in a bid by manufacturers to minimise risk to customers, and the negative impact on business that might result from exposure to trace amounts of food allergen present during cross-contamination during production. This has resulted in near ubiquitous utilisation of a multitude of different precautionary allergen labels with subsequent confusion amongst many consumers as to their significance. The global nature of food production and manufacturing makes harmonisation of allergen labelling regulations across the world a matter of increasing importance. Addressing inconsistencies across countries with regards to labelling legislation, as well as improvement or even banning of precautionary allergy labelling are both likely to be significant steps forward in improved food safety for allergic families. This article outlines the current status of allergen labelling legislation around the world and reviews the value of current existing precautionary allergen labelling for the allergic consumer. We strongly urge for an international framework to be considered to help roadmap a solution to the weaknesses of the current systems, and discuss the role of legislation in facilitating this.
    World Allergy Organization Journal 01/2014; 7(1):10.
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    ABSTRACT: While food allergies and eczema are among the most common chronic non-communicable diseases in children in many countries worldwide, quality data on the burden of these diseases is lacking, particularly in developing countries. This 2012 survey was performed to collect information on existing data on the global patterns and prevalence of food allergy by surveying all the national member societies of the World Allergy Organisation, and some of their neighbouring countries. Data were collected from 89 countries, including published data, and changes in the health care burden of food allergy. More than half of the countries surveyed (52/89) did not have any data on food allergy prevalence. Only 10% (9/89) of countries had accurate food allergy prevalence data, based on oral food challenges (OFC). The remaining countries (23/89) had data largely based on parent-reporting of a food allergy diagnosis or symptoms, which is recognised to overestimate the prevalence of food allergy. Based on more accurate measures, the prevalence of clinical (OFC proven) food allergy in preschool children in developed countries is now as high as 10%. In large and rapidly emerging societies of Asia, such as China, where there are documented increases in food allergy, the prevalence of OFC-proven food allergy is now around 7% in pre-schoolers, comparable to the reported prevalence in European regions. While food allergy appears to be increasing in both developed and developing countries in the last 10--15 years, there is a lack of quality comparative data. This survey also highlights inequities in paediatric allergy services, availability of adrenaline auto-injectors and standardised National Anaphylaxis Action plans. In conclusion, there remains a need to gather more accurate data on the prevalence of food allergy in many developed and developing countries to better anticipate and address the rising community and health service burden of food allergy.
    World Allergy Organization Journal 12/2013; 6(1):21.
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    ABSTRACT: It has been hypothesized that high environmental exposure to peanut allergens may be a potent risk factor for cutaneous sensitization. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether peanut proteins are detectable in house dust of different household areas. Peanut levels of dust samples were measured with ELISA. Overall, peanut was detectable in 19 of 21 households in the eating area and/or in bed. The frequency of peanut consumption correlated with peanut levels. Forty-eight hours after intentional peanut consumption, peanut levels were highly increased. Nevertheless, further research is required to prove whether peanut allergen in house dust can cause sensitization via skin.
    Allergy 11/2013; 68(11):1460-2. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Reported food-related symptoms of patients may sometimes be misleading. A correct delineation of food-induced symptoms is often difficult and various differential diagnoses have to be considered. We report on two cases of food-induced, predominantly respiratory symptoms (in one case life-threatening) in children with food allergy. First, a two-year-old boy with no history of allergies and suspected foreign body aspiration which was finally diagnosed as an anaphylactic reaction to fish, and secondly a six-year-old girl with multiple food allergies and allergic asthma who during an electively performed oral food challenge developed severe respiratory distress, drop in blood pressure, and asphyxia not due to an anaphylactic reaction but due to choking on an unnoticed sweet. These two cases represent challenging, life-threatening symptom constellations involving food-induced reactions in food allergic children, reminding us to question first impressions. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013 9999:XX-XX. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Pulmonology 10/2013; · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    Allergy 08/2013; 68(8):1081-3. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    Clinical and Translational Allergy. 07/2013; 3(3).
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    Clinical and Translational Allergy. 07/2013; 3(3).
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    Clinical and Translational Allergy. 07/2013; 3(3).

Publication Stats

4k Citations
797.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2014
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • • Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pneumonology and Immunology
      • • Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2012
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1994–2012
    • University of Iowa Children's Hospital
      Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Geneva
      • Division of Paediatrics
      Genève, GE, Switzerland
  • 1996–2010
    • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
      • Department of Biology
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2000–2009
    • Mount Sinai School of Medicine
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Manhattan, NY, United States
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 1999–2001
    • Mount Sinai Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Riley Hospital for Children
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
    • Hochschule für Gesundheit und Medizin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1993
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany