Augustine M K Choi

Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (289)1669.24 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The discovery that retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (Rora)-α is highly expressed in lungs of patients with COPD led us to hypothesize that Rora may contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema. To determine the role of Rora in smoke-induced emphysema. Cigarette smoke extract in vitro and elastase or cigarette smoke exposure in vivo were used to model smoke-related cell stress and airspace enlargement. Lung tissue from patients undergoing lung transplantation was examined for markers of DNA damage and Rora expression. Rora expression was induced by cigarette smoke in mice and in cell culture. Gene expression profiling of Rora-null mice exposed to cigarette smoke demonstrated enrichment for genes involved in DNA repair. Rora expression increased and Rora translocated to the nucleus after DNA damage. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia mutated decreased the induction of Rora. Gene silencing of Rora attenuated apoptotic cell death in response to cigarette smoke extract, whereas overexpression of Rora enhanced apoptosis. Rora-deficient mice were protected from elastase and cigarette smoke induced airspace enlargement. Finally, lungs of patients with COPD showed evidence of increased DNA damage even in the absence of active smoking. Taken together, these findings suggest that DNA damage may contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema, and that Rora has a previously unrecognized role in cellular responses to genotoxicity. These findings provide a potential link between emphysema and features of premature ageing, including enhanced susceptibility to lung cancer.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 06/2012; 186(5):412-9. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor-2) signaling pathway is known to play a pivotal role in a variety of oxidative stress-related human disorders. It has been reported recently that the plasma membrane resident protein caveolin-1 (Cav-1) can regulate expression of certain antioxidant enzymes and involves in the pathogenesis of oxidative lung injury, but the detailed molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrated that Cav-1 inhibited the expression of antioxidant enzymes through direct interaction with Nrf2 and subsequent suppression of its transcriptional activity in lung epithelial Beas-2B cells. Cav-1 deficiency cells exhibited higher levels of antioxidant enzymes and were more resistant to oxidative stress induced cytotoxicity, whereas overexpression of Cav-1 suppressed the induction of these enzymes and further augmented the oxidative cell death. Cav-1 constitutively interacted with Nrf2 in both cytosol and nucleus. Stimulation of 4-hydroxynonenol increased the Cav-1-Nrf2 interaction in cytosol but disrupted their association in the nucleus. Knockdown of Cav-1 also disassociated the interaction between Nrf2 and its cytoplasmic inhibitor Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) and increased the Nrf2 transcription activity. Mutation of the resembling Cav-1 binding motif on Nrf2 effectively attenuated their interaction, which exhibited higher transcription activity and induced higher levels of antioxidant enzymes relative to the wild-type control. Altogether, these studies clearly demonstrate that Cav-1 inhibits cellular antioxidant capacity through direct interaction with Nrf2 and subsequent suppression of its activity, thereby implicating in certain oxidative stress-related human pathologies.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 04/2012; 287(25):20922-30. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process);5,6 thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4). · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Autophagy 04/2012; 8(4):445-544. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    Autophagy 04/2012; 4454(8):445-544. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in clinical management, there are currently no reliable diagnostic and therapeutic targets for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The inflammasome/caspase-1 pathway regulates the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-18). IL-18 is associated with injury in animal models of systemic inflammation. We sought to determine the contribution of the inflammasome pathway in experimental acute lung injury and human ARDS. We performed comprehensive gene expression profiling on peripheral blood from patients with critical illness. Gene expression changes were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and IL-18 levels were measured in the plasma of the critically ill patients. Wild-type mice or mice genetically deficient in IL-18 or caspase-1 were mechanically ventilated using moderate tidal volume (12 ml/kg). Lung injury parameters were assessed in lung tissue, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In mice, mechanical ventilation enhanced IL-18 levels in the lung, serum, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. IL-18-neutralizing antibody treatment, or genetic deletion of IL-18 or caspase-1, reduced lung injury in response to mechanical ventilation. In human patients with ARDS, inflammasome-related mRNA transcripts (CASP1, IL1B, and IL18) were increased in peripheral blood. In samples from four clinical centers, IL-18 was elevated in the plasma of patients with ARDS (sepsis or trauma-induced ARDS) and served as a novel biomarker of intensive care unit morbidity and mortality. The inflammasome pathway and its downstream cytokines play critical roles in ARDS development.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 03/2012; 185(11):1225-34. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: (Macro)autophagy provides a membrane-dependent mechanism for the sequestration, transport, and lysosomal turnover of subcellular components, including proteins and organelles. In this capacity, autophagy maintains basal cellular homeostasis and healthy organelle populations such as mitochondria. During starvation, autophagy prolongs cell survival by recycling metabolic precursors from intracellular macromolecules. Furthermore, autophagy represents an inducible response to chemical and physical cellular stress. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy, and its regulatory proteins, may critically influence vital cellular processes such as programmed cell death, cell proliferation, inflammation, and innate immune functions and thereby may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of human disease. The function of autophagy in disease pathogenesis remains unclear and may involve either impaired or accelerated autophagic activity or imbalances in the activation of autophagic proteins. This review examines the roles of autophagy in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases, with emphasis on pulmonary vascular disease and acute and chronic lung diseases.
    Annual Review of Physiology 03/2012; 74:377-401. · 19.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in the development or progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) is controversial. To evaluate the association between statin use and ILD. We used regression analyses to evaluate the association between statin use and interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in a large cohort of smokers from COPDGene. Next, we evaluated the effect of statin pretreatment on bleomycin-induced fibrosis in mice and explored the mechanism behind these observations in vitro. In COPDGene, 38% of subjects with ILA were taking statins compared with 27% of subjects without ILA. Statin use was positively associated in ILA (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.50; P = 0.04) after adjustment for covariates including a history of high cholesterol or coronary artery disease. This association was modified by the hydrophilicity of statin and the age of the subject. Next, we demonstrate that statin administration aggravates lung injury and fibrosis in bleomycin-treated mice. Statin pretreatment enhances caspase-1-mediated immune responses in vivo and in vitro; the latter responses were abolished in bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from Nlrp3(-/-) and Casp1(-/-) mice. Finally, we provide further insights by demonstrating that statins enhance NLRP3-inflammasome activation by increasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation in macrophages. Statin use is associated with ILA among smokers in the COPDGene study and enhances bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in the mouse through a mechanism involving enhanced NLRP3-inflammasome activation. Our findings suggest that statins may influence the susceptibility to, or progression of, ILD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00608764).
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 03/2012; 185(5):547-56. · 11.04 Impact Factor
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    Yang Jin, Akihiko Tanaka, Augustine M K Choi, Stefan W Ryter
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    ABSTRACT: Oxygen (O 2), while essential for aerobic life, can also cause metabolic toxicity through the excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Pathological changes in ROS production can originate through the partial reduction of O 2 during mitochondrial electron transport, as well as from enzymatic sources. This phenomenon, termed the oxygen paradox, has been implicated in aging and disease, and is especially evident in critical care medicine. Whereas high O 2 concentrations are utilized as a life-sustaining therapeutic for respiratory insufficiency, they in turn can cause acute lung injury. Alveolar epithelial cells represent a primary target of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Recent studies have indicated that epithelial cells exposed to high O 2 concentrations die by apoptosis, or necrosis, and can also exhibit mixed-phenotypes of cell death (aponecrosis). Autophagy, a cellular homeostatic process responsible for the lysosomal turnover of organelles and proteins, has been implicated as a general response to oxidative stress in cells and tissues. This evolutionarily conserved process is finely regulated by a complex interplay of protein factors. During autophagy, senescent organelles and cellular proteins are sequestered in autophagic vacuoles (autophagosomes) and subsequently targeted to the lysosome, where they are degraded by lysosomal hydrolases, and the breakdown products released for reutilization in anabolic pathways. Autophagy has been implicated as a cell survival mechanism during nutrient-deficiency states, and more generally, as a determinant of cell fate. However, the mechanisms by which autophagy and/or autophagic proteins potentially interact with and/or regulate cell death pathways during high oxygen stress, remain only partially understood.
    Autophagy 03/2012; 8(3):426-8. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic lung diseases contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of the population. There are few effective treatments for many chronic lung diseases, and even fewer therapies that can arrest or reverse the progress of the disease. In this review, we present the current state of regenerative therapies for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. We focus on endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and endogenous lung stem/progenitor cells; summarize the work to date in models of lung diseases for each of these therapies; and consider their potential benefits and risks as viable therapies for patients with lung diseases. Cell-based regenerative therapies for lung diseases offer great promise, with preclinical studies suggesting that the next decade should provide the evidence necessary for their ultimate application to our therapeutic armamentarium.
    European Journal of Clinical Investigation 02/2012; 42(8):900-13. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex disease with poorly understood etiology. Previously, we reported upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) in both lung and peripheral blood of IPF patients. Here we report evidence for genetic correlation of plasma levels and promoter polymorphisms (rs11568818 and rs11568819) of MMP7 in a well-characterized IPF cohort. Both the AA genotype of rs11568818 and the CT genotype of rs11568819 were found to be significantly associated with higher MMP7 plasma levels. These associations were observed only in IPF patients and not in healthy controls. The G-to-A transition of rs11568818 resulted in a novel binding site for the forkhead box A2 (FOXA2) transcription factor, a key regulator of embryonic lung development and proper function of the mature lung. In vitro, this transition led to increased sensitivity of the MMP7 promoter to FOXA2. In IPF lungs, FOXA2 was localized in the nucleus of epithelial cells that expressed MMP7 in the cytoplasm. These results suggest that increased sensitivity of the polymorphic MMP7 promoter to FOXA2 provides one of the genetic bases for the upregulation of MMP7 in IPF.
    AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 01/2012; 302(8):L746-54. · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    Autophagy 01/2012; 4454(8):445-544. · 12.04 Impact Factor
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    Yang Jin, Augustine M K Choi
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    ABSTRACT: Endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and apoptosis resistant proliferation have been proposed to play crucial roles in the development of featured plexiform lesions in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Subsequently, EC injury associated smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation facilitates vascular remodeling and eventually leads to narrowed vascular lumen, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, increased pulmonary arterial pressure, and right heart failure. The imbalance between cell death and proliferation occurs in every stage of pulmonary vascular remodeling and pathogenesis of PH, and involves every cell type in the vasculature including, but not limited to ECs, SMCs, and fibroblasts. Despite extensive studies, the detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms on how the transition from initial apoptosis of ECs to apoptosis resistant proliferation on ECs and SMCs remains unclear. Recent knowledge on autophagy, a conservative and powerful regulatory machinery existing in almost all mammalian cells, has shed light on the complex and delicate control on cell fate in the development of vascular remodeling in PH. In this review, we will discuss the recent understandings on how the cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy regulates cell death or proliferation in PH pathogenesis, particularly in pulmonary vascular remodeling involving ECs and SMCs.
    Pulmonary circulation. 01/2012; 2(4):407-414.
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    ABSTRACT: Gene targeting in mice (transgenic and knockout) has provided investigators with an unparalleled armamentarium in recent decades to dissect the cellular and molecular basis of critical pathophysiological states. Fruitful information has been derived from studies using these genetically engineered mice with significant impact on our understanding, not only of specific biological processes spanning cell proliferation to cell death, but also of critical molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of human disease. This review will focus on the use of gene-targeted mice to study various models of lung disease including airways diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia, and acute lung injury. We will attempt to review the current technological approaches of generating gene-targeted mice and the enormous dataset derived from these studies, providing a template for lung investigators.
    AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 12/2011; 302(6):L485-97. · 3.52 Impact Factor
  • Suzanne M Cloonan, Augustine M K Choi
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    ABSTRACT: Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with the manifestation and origin of a plethora of diseases and disorders. Whilst classically the role of these archetypical 'powerhouses' in many disease phenotypes has been attributed to their ability to regulate cell metabolism and cell death pathways, emerging data posit that mitochondria may also act as powerful initiators and masters of the innate immune response. This new paradigm complements the current mitochondrial dogma, whereby molecules endogenously present on or inside the mitochondria may act as immune regulators in response to stress or pathogens and may also be responsible for the initiation and/or manifestation of chronic inflammation observed in many diseases and disorders.
    Current opinion in immunology 12/2011; 24(1):32-40. · 10.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple intergenic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) on chromosome 4q31 have been strongly associated with pulmonary function levels and moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, whether the effects of variants in this region are related to HHIP or another gene has not been proven. We confirmed genetic association of SNPs in the 4q31 COPD genome-wide association study (GWAS) region in a Polish cohort containing severe COPD cases and healthy smoking controls (P = 0.001 to 0.002). We found that HHIP expression at both mRNA and protein levels is reduced in COPD lung tissues. We identified a genomic region located ∼85 kb upstream of HHIP which contains a subset of associated SNPs, interacts with the HHIP promoter through a chromatin loop and functions as an HHIP enhancer. The COPD risk haplotype of two SNPs within this enhancer region (rs6537296A and rs1542725C) was associated with statistically significant reductions in HHIP promoter activity. Moreover, rs1542725 demonstrates differential binding to the transcription factor Sp3; the COPD-associated allele exhibits increased Sp3 binding, which is consistent with Sp3's usual function as a transcriptional repressor. Thus, increased Sp3 binding at a functional SNP within the chromosome 4q31 COPD GWAS locus leads to reduced HHIP expression and increased susceptibility to COPD through distal transcriptional regulation. Together, our findings reveal one mechanism through which SNPs upstream of the HHIP gene modulate the expression of HHIP and functionally implicate reduced HHIP gene expression in the pathogenesis of COPD.
    Human Molecular Genetics 12/2011; 21(6):1325-35. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial cell death plays a critical role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. We investigated the involvement of the autophagic marker microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3B (LC3B) in epithelial cell apoptosis after hyperoxia. Prolonged hyperoxia (>95% O(2)), which causes characteristic lung injury in mice, activated morphological and biochemical markers of autophagy. Hyperoxia induced the time-dependent expression and conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II in mouse lung in vivo and in cultured epithelial cells (Beas-2B, human bronchial epithelial cells) in vitro. Hyperoxia increased autophagosome formation in Beas-2B cells, as evidenced by electron microscopy and increased GFP-LC3 puncta. The augmented LC3B level after hyperoxia was transcriptionally regulated and dependent in part on the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. We hypothesized that LC3B plays a regulatory role in hyperoxia-induced epithelial apoptosis. LC3B siRNA promoted hyperoxia-induced cell death in epithelial cells, whereas overexpression of LC3B conferred cytoprotection after hyperoxia. The autophagic protein LC3B cross-regulated the Fas apoptotic pathway by physically interacting with the components of death-inducing signaling complex. This interaction was mediated by caveolin-1 tyrosine 14, which is a known target of phosphorylation induced by hyperoxia. Taken together, hyperoxia-induced LC3B activation regulates the Fas apoptotic pathway and thus confers cytoprotection in lung epithelial cells. The interaction of LC3B and Fas pathways requires cav-1.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 11/2011; 46(4):507-14. · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 2 (NOD2) stimulates diverse inflammatory responses resulting in differential cellular phenotypes. To identify the role of NOD2 in vascular arterial obstructive diseases, we investigated the expression and pathophysiological role of NOD2 in a vascular injury model of neointimal hyperplasia. We first analyzed for neointimal hyperplasia following femoral artery injury in NOD2(+/+) and NOD2(-/-) mice. NOD2(-/-) mice showed a 2.86-fold increase in neointimal formation that was mainly composed of smooth muscle (SM) α-actin positive cells. NOD2 was expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and NOD2(-/-) VSMCs showed increased cell proliferation in response to mitogenic stimuli, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), or fetal bovine serum, compared with NOD2(+/+) VSMCs. Furthermore, NOD2 deficiency markedly promoted VSMCs migration in response to PDGF-BB, and this increased cell migration was attenuated by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor. However, protein kinase C and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitors exerted negligible effects. Moreover, muramyl dipeptide-stimulated NOD2 prevented PDGF-BB-induced VSMCs migration. Functional NOD2 was found to be expressed in VSMCs, and NOD2 deficiency promoted VSMCs proliferation, migration, and neointimal formation after vascular injury. These results provide evidence for the involvement of NOD2 in vascular homeostasis and tissue injury, serving as a potential molecular target in the modulation of arteriosclerotic vascular disease.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 09/2011; 31(11):2441-7. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • Eun-Kyeong Jo, Dong-Min Shin, Augustine M K Choi
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    ABSTRACT: Autophagy can orchestrate a variety of cellular responses to dangerous stimuli. Our understanding of the physiologic roles of autophagy has recently expanded; in addition to its other roles, autophagy now appears to play an essential role in regulating inflammatory responses. This review describes recent findings concerning the roles and mechanisms of autophagy in controlling excessive inflammation.
    Microbes and Infection 09/2011; 14(2):119-25. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    Jeffrey A Haspel, Augustine M K Choi
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    ABSTRACT: Autophagy is a highly conserved homeostatic pathway by which cells transport damaged proteins and organelles to lysosomes for degradation. Dysregulation of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of clinically important disorders in a variety of organ systems but, until recently, little was known about its relationship to diseases of the lung. However, there is now growing evidence at the basic research level that autophagy is linked to the pathogenesis of important pulmonary disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and tuberculosis. In this review, we provide an introduction to the field of autophagy research geared to clinical and research pulmonologists. We focus on the best-studied autophagic mechanism, macroautophagy, and summarize studies that link the regulation of this pathway to pulmonary disease. Last, we offer our perspective on how a better understanding of macroautophagy might be used for designing novel therapies for pulmonary disorders.
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 08/2011; 184(11):1237-46. · 11.04 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

16k Citations
1,669.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2013
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2008–2013
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2011
    • Kyung Hee University
      • College of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Partners HealthCare
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Chungnam National University
      • Department of Microbiology
      Seongnam, Gyeonggi, South Korea
  • 2001–2011
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • • Department of Critical Care Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Surgery
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 2010
    • Alpert Medical School - Brown University
      Providence, Rhode Island, United States
  • 2005–2006
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Center for Vascular Biology Research
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 1999–2004
    • Yale University
      • Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
      New Haven, CT, United States
  • 2003
    • UPMC
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    • University of Groningen
      • Department of Pulmonary Diseases
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands
  • 1992–2000
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      • Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 1995–1999
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
      • • Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 1992–1995
    • National Institute on Aging
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States