Josephine C Dorsman

VU University Medical Center, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

Are you Josephine C Dorsman?

Claim your profile

Publications (40)203.62 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a childhood cancer of the retina, commonly initiated by biallelic inactivation of the RB1 gene. Knowledge of the presence of a heritable RB1 mutation can help in risk management and reproductive decision making. We report here on RB1 mutation scanning in a unique nationwide cohort of Rb patients from the Netherlands. From the 1173 Rb patients registered in the Dutch National Retinoblastoma Register until January 2013, 529 patients from 433 unrelated families could be included. RB1 mutation scanning was performed with different detection methods, depending on the time period. Our mutation detection methods revealed RB1 mutations in 92% of bilateral and/or familial Rb patients and in 10% of non-familial unilateral cases. Overall an RB1 germline mutation was detected in 187 (43%) of 433 Rb families, including 33 novel mutations. The distribution of the type of mutation was 37% nonsense, 20% frameshift, 21% splice, 9% large indel, 5% missense, 7% chromosomal deletions and 1% promoter. Ten per cent of patients were mosaic for the RB1 mutation. Six three-generation families with incomplete penetrance RB1 mutations were found. We found evidence that two variants, previously described as pathogenic RB1 mutations, are likely to be neutral variants. The frequency of the type of mutations in the RB1 gene in our unbiased national cohort is the same as the mutation spectrum described worldwide. Furthermore, our RB1 mutation detection regimen achieves a high scanning sensitivity.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 03/2014; · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Both hereditary and nonhereditary retinoblastoma (Rb) are commonly initiated by loss of both copies of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (RB1), while additional genomic changes are required for tumor initiation and progression. Our aim was to determine whether there is genomic heterogeneity between different clinical Rb subtypes. Therefore, 21 Rb tumors from 11 hereditary patients and 10 nonhereditary Rb patients were analyzed using high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and gene losses and gains were validated with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification. In these tumors only a few focal aberrations were detected. The most frequent was a focal gain on chromosome 2p24.3, the minimal region of gain encompassing the oncogene MYCN. The genes BAZ1A, OTX2, FUT8, and AKT1 were detected in four focal regions on chromosome 14 in one nonhereditary Rb. There was a large difference in number of copy number aberrations between tumors. A subset of nonhereditary Rbs turned out to be the most genomic unstable, while especially very young patients with hereditary Rb display stable genomes. Established Rb copy number aberrations, including gain of chromosome arm 1q and loss of chromosome arm 16q, turned out to be preferentially associated with the nonhereditary Rbs with later age of diagnosis. In contrast, copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity was detected mainly on chromosome 13, where RB1 resides, irrespective of hereditary status or age. Focal amplifications and deletions and copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity besides chromosome 13 appear to be rare events in retinoblastoma. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 01/2014; 53(1):1-14. · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome associated with increased cancer predisposition. The underlying genes govern the FA pathway which functions to protect the genome during the S-phase of the cell cycle. While upregulation of FA genes has been linked to chemotherapy resistance, little is known about their regulation in response to proliferative stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine how FA genes are regulated, especially in relation to the cell cycle, in order to reveal their possible participation in biochemical networks. Expression of 14 FA genes was monitored in two human cell-cycle models and in two RB1/E2F pathway-associated primary cancers, retinoblastoma and basal breast cancer. In silico studies were performed to further evaluate coregulation and identify connected networks and diseases. Only FANCA was consistently induced over 2-fold; FANCF failed to exhibit any regulatory fluctuations. Two tools exploiting public data sets indicated coregulation of FANCA with BRCA1. Upregulation of FANCA and BRCA1 correlated with upregulation of E2F3. Genes coregulated with both FANCA and BRCA1 were enriched for MeSH-Term id(s) genomic instability, microcephaly, and Bloom syndrome, and enriched for the cellular component centrosome. The regulation of FA genes appears highly divergent. In RB1-linked tumors, upregulation of FA network genes was associated with reduced expression of FANCF. FANCA and BRCA1 may jointly act in a subnetwork - supporting vital function(s) at the subcellular level (centrosome) as well as at the level of embryonic development (mechanisms controlling head circumference).
    SpringerPlus 01/2014; 3:381.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Retinoblastoma is the childhood retinal cancer that defined tumour-suppressor genes. Previous work shows that mutation of both alleles of the RB1 retinoblastoma suppressor gene initiates disease. We aimed to characterise non-familial retinoblastoma tumours with no detectable RB1 mutations. METHODS: Of 1068 unilateral non-familial retinoblastoma tumours, we compared those with no evidence of RB1 mutations (RB1(+/+)) with tumours carrying a mutation in both alleles (RB1(-/-)). We analysed genomic copy number, RB1 gene expression and protein function, retinal gene expression, histological features, and clinical data. FINDINGS: No RB1 mutations (RB1(+/+)) were reported in 29 (2·7%) of 1068 unilateral retinoblastoma tumours. 15 of the 29 RB1(+/+) tumours had high-level MYCN oncogene amplification (28-121 copies; RB1(+/+)MYCN(A)), whereas none of 93 RB1(-/-) primary tumours tested showed MYCN amplification (p<0·0001). RB1(+/+)MYCN(A) tumours expressed functional RB1 protein, had fewer overall genomic copy-number changes in genes characteristic of retinoblastoma than did RB1(-/-) tumours, and showed distinct aggressive histological features. MYCN amplification was the sole copy-number change in one RB1(+/+)MYCN(A) retinoblastoma. One additional MYCN(A) tumour was discovered after the initial frequencies were determined, and this is included in further analyses. Median age at diagnosis of the 17 children with RB1(+/+)MYCN(A) tumours was 4·5 months (IQR 3·5-10), compared with 24 months (15-37) for 79 children with non-familial unilateral RB1(-/-) retinoblastoma. INTERPRETATION: Amplification of the MYCN oncogene might initiate retinoblastoma in the presence of non-mutated RB1 genes. These unilateral RB1(+/+)MYCN(A) retinoblastomas are characterised by distinct histological features, only a few of the genomic copy-number changes that are characteristic of retinoblastoma, and very early age of diagnosis. FUNDING: National Cancer Institute-National Institutes of Health, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, German Research Foundation, Canadian Retinoblastoma Society, Hyland Foundation, Toronto Netralaya and Doctors Lions Clubs, Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care, UK-Essen, and Foundations Avanti-STR and KiKa.
    The Lancet Oncology 03/2013; · 25.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a heterogeneous recessive disorder associated with a markedly elevated risk to develop cancer. To date sixteen FA genes have been identified, three of which predispose heterozygous mutation carriers to breast cancer. The FA proteins work together in a genome maintenance pathway, the so-called FA/BRCA pathway which is important during the S phase of the cell cycle. Since not all FA patients can be linked to (one of) the sixteen known complementation groups, new FA genes remain to be identified. In addition the complex FA network remains to be further unravelled. One of the FA genes, FANCI, has been identified via a combination of bioinformatic techniques exploiting FA protein properties and genetic linkage. The aim of this study was to develop a prioritization approach for proteins of the entire human proteome that potentially interact with the FA/BRCA pathway or are novel candidate FA genes. To this end, we combined the original bioinformatics approach based on the properties of the first thirteen FA proteins identified with publicly available tools for protein-protein interactions, literature mining (Nermal) and a protein function prediction tool (FuncNet). Importantly, the three newest FA proteins FANCO/RAD51C, FANCP/SLX4, and XRCC2 displayed scores in the range of the already known FA proteins. Likewise, a prime candidate FA gene based on next generation sequencing and having a very low score was subsequently disproven by functional studies for the FA phenotype. Furthermore, the approach strongly enriches for GO terms such as DNA repair, response to DNA damage stimulus, and cell cycle-regulated genes. Additionally, overlaying the top 150 with a haploinsufficiency probability score, renders the approach more tailored for identifying breast cancer related genes. This approach may be useful for prioritization of putative novel FA or breast cancer genes from next generation sequencing efforts.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(4):e62017. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an inherited disease with congenital and developmental abnormalities characterised by cellular cross linker hypersensitivity. FA is caused by mutations in any of so far 15 identified FANC genes, which encode proteins that interact in a common DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Individuals with FA have a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and squamous cell carcinoma. An increased cancer risk has been firmly established for carriers of mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCJ/BRIP1, FANCN/PALB2, RAD51C/FANCO and link the FA pathway to inherited breast and ovarian cancer. We describe a pedigree with FANCD2 mutations c.458T > C (p.Leu153Ser) and c.2715 + 1G > A (p.Glu906LeufsX4) with mild phenotype FA in the index case, T cell ALL in the Leu153Ser heterozygous brother and testicular seminoma in the p.Glu906LeufsX4 heterozygous father. Both FANCD2 alleles were present in the T Cell ALL and the seminoma. This links specific FANCD2 mutations to T cell ALL and seminoma without evidence of allelic loss in the tumour tissue.
    Familial Cancer 07/2012; · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Expansion of polyglutamine repeats is the cause of at least nine inherited human neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD). It is widely accepted that deregulation of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by expanded huntingtin (htt) plays an important role in HD molecular pathogenesis. In this study, we report on a novel target of expanded polyglutamine stretches, the transcriptional coactivator Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1), which shares DNA-sequence-specific transcription factor targets with CBP. Jab1 also plays a major role in the degradation of the cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor and putative transcription cofactor p27(Kip1). We found that Jab1 accumulates in aggregates when co-expressed with either expanded polyglutamine stretches or N-terminal fragments of mutant htt. In addition, the coactivator function of Jab1 was suppressed both by aggregated expanded polyglutamine solely and by mutant htt. Inhibition by mutant htt even preceded the appearance of microscopic aggregation. In an exon 1 HD cell model, we found that endogenous Jab1 could be recruited into aggregates and that this was accompanied by the accumulation of p27(Kip1). Accumulation of p27(Kip1) was also found in brains derived from HD patients. The repression of Jab1 by various mechanisms coupled with an increase of p27(Kip1) at late stages may have important transcriptional effects. In addition, the interference with the Jab1-p27(Kip1) pathway may contribute to the observed lower incidence of cancer in HD patients and may also be relevant for the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of polyglutamine disorders in general.
    Neurobiology of Disease 03/2012; 46(3):673-81. · 5.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic instability syndrome characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure, and a high cancer risk. Fifteen genetic subtypes have been distinguished. The majority of patients (≈85%) belong to the subtypes A (≈60%), C (≈15%) or G (≈10%), while a minority (≈15%) is distributed over the remaining 12 subtypes. All subtypes seem to fit within the "classical" FA phenotype, except for D1 and N patients, who have more severe clinical symptoms. Since FA patients need special clinical management, the diagnosis should be firmly established, to exclude conditions with overlapping phenotypes. A valid FA diagnosis requires the detection of pathogenic mutations in a FA gene and/or a positive result from a chromosomal breakage test. Identification of the pathogenic mutations is also important for adequate genetic counselling and to facilitate prenatal or preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Here we describe and validate a comprehensive protocol for the molecular diagnosis of FA, based on massively parallel sequencing. We used this approach to identify BRCA2, FANCD2, FANCI and FANCL mutations in novel unclassified FA patients.
    Anemia 01/2012; 2012:132856.
  • Histopathology 10/2010; 57(4):634-7. · 2.86 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine the incidence of activating v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene (BRAF) mutations in 30 serous borderline tumors (SBTs) of the ovary and the accompanying implants and to link BRAF mutation status to the clinical behavior of these tumors. Serous borderline tumors and noninvasive implants of 30 patients were analyzed for the presence of the BRAF V599E mutation, and mutation status was correlated to 70 months of clinical follow-up. Mutation status could be assessed in 27 SBTs. Eleven (41%) showed a BRAF mulation. Four (80%) of 5 patients with bilateral SBT showed a BRAF mutation in both ovaries. From the 8 implants that were analyzed for BRAF, 2 (25%) were mutated together with their primary tumor. v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene mutation positive SBTs tend to present with a lower International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and a higher tumor volume and are less frequently aneuploid. Seventy months' follow-up indicated no significant recurrence-free survival difference between these groups. v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene mutations are common in ovarian SBT, are strongly associated with bilateral tumors, and are also found in implants. A larger number of tumors should be investigated to assess clinical importance of BRAF mutation status in SBTs.
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 12/2009; 19(9):1560-3. · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 07/2009; 118(3):651-3. · 4.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Huntington's disease is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder that is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD or Huntington's disease gene. Although micro array studies on patient and animal tissue provide valuable information, the primary effect of mutant huntingtin will inevitably be masked by secondary processes in advanced stages of the disease. Thus, cell models are instrumental to study early, direct effects of mutant huntingtin. mRNA changes were studied in an inducible PC12 model of Huntington's disease, before and after aggregates became visible, to identify groups of genes that could play a role in the early pathology of Huntington's disease. Before aggregation, up-regulation of gene expression predominated, while after aggregates became visible, down-regulation and up-regulation occurred to the same extent. After aggregates became visible there was a down-regulation of dopamine biosynthesis genes accompanied by down-regulation of dopamine levels in culture, indicating the utility of this model to identify functionally relevant pathways. Furthermore, genes of the anti-oxidant Nrf2-ARE pathway were up-regulated, possibly as a protective mechanism. In parallel, we discovered alterations in genes which may result in increased oxidative stress and damage. Up-regulation of gene expression may be more important in HD pathology than previously appreciated. In addition, given the pathogenic impact of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway constitutes a new attractive therapeutic target for HD.
    BMC Molecular Biology 11/2008; 9:84. · 2.80 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine expression of p53, HER-2/neu and p27(Kip1) in serous Fallopian tube carcinoma (FTC) in relation to stage and grade, and to investigate DNA copy number changes of HER-2 and P27KIP1 as a potential mechanism of altered expression status. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 28 serous FTCs and 10 normal Fallopian tubes. p53 protein accumulated and p27(Kip1) was down-regulated significantly in early-stage FTCs compared with normal Fallopian tubes. HER-2/neu overexpression was absent in normal Fallopian tubes and in all stage I FTCs (n = 6) but present in 57% (12/21) of advanced-stage FTCs. No differences in expression between grade 2 and 3 tumours were detected. HER-2 gain/amplification was found by array comparative genomic hybridization in 23% (3/13) of analysed FTCs and all showed overexpression. HER-2/neu overexpression also occurred without DNA copy number changes in three other cases. For p27(Kip1), expression and DNA copy number were unrelated. p53 accumulation and p27(Kip1) down-regulation seem to be early events in Fallopian tube carcinogenesis. HER-2/neu showed overexpression, caused by gain/amplification in 50%, and may be involved in progression of FTC. These data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis of FTC and to possible new therapeutic approaches.
    Histopathology 12/2007; 51(5):666-73. · 2.86 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary serous ovarian carcinoma (OVCA) and serous Fallopian tube carcinoma (FTC), both belonging to the BRCA-linked tumour spectrum, share many properties and are treated similarly. However, a detailed molecular comparison has been lacking. We hypothesized that comparative genomic studies of serous OVCAs and FTCs should point to gene regions critically involved in their tumorigenesis. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analysis indicated that serous OVCAs and serous FTCs displayed common but also more distinctive patterns of recurrent changes. Targeted gene identification using a dedicated multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) probe set directly identified EIF2C2 on 8q as a potentially important driver gene. Other previously unappreciated gained/amplified genes included PSMB4 on 1q, MTSS1 on 8q, TEAD4 and TSPAN9 on 12p, and BCAS4 on 20q. SPINT2 and ACTN4 on 19q were predominantly found in FTCs. Gains/amplifications of CCNE1 and MYC, often in conjunction with changes in genes of the AKT pathway, EVI1 and PTK2, seemed to be involved at earlier stages, whereas changes of ERBB2 were associated with advanced stages. The only BRCA1-mutated FTC shared common denominators with the sporadic tumours. In conclusion, the data suggest that serous OVCAs and FTCs, although related, exhibit differences in genomic profiles. In addition to known pathways, new genes/pathways are likely to be involved, with changes in an miRNA-associated gene, EIF2C2, as one important new feature. Dedicated MLPA sets constitute potentially important tools for differential diagnosis and may provide footholds for tailored therapy.
    The Journal of Pathology 10/2007; 213(1):46-55. · 7.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and its transcriptional regulator Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) play an important role in the process of angiogenesis in many types of cancer, including ovarian cancer. We have examined whether the DNA-damaging drugs cisplatin and doxorubicin and the microtubule inhibitors docetaxel and paclitaxel can affect VEGF expression and HIF-1 activity in three human ovarian cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that cisplatin and doxorubicin abolish hypoxia-induced VEGF mRNA expression in all cell lines, while basal VEGF mRNA expression was also downregulated. Transient transfection with a HIF-1-responsive luciferase construct indicated that cisplatin and doxorubicin inhibited hypoxic activation of HIF-1. Cisplatin repressed HIF-1alpha protein expression in all cell lines. Stimulation of HIF-1alpha protein degradation by cisplatin was observed in the only cell line expressing wild-type p53. Cisplatin also inhibited the synthesis of HIF-1alpha protein for which p53 was dispensable. Interestingly, cisplatin strongly reduced the protein levels of the HIF-1 coactivators p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) under hypoxia in all cell lines. Although doxorubicin inhibited hypoxic activation of HIF-1, this drug had no significant effect on the expression levels of HIF-1alpha and hypoxic expression of p300 and CBP was only weakly reduced. Docetaxel and paclitaxel did neither influence VEGF expression nor hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activity. In total, our findings indicate that cisplatin and doxorubicin can repress hypoxic induction of VEGF expression by inhibiting HIF-1 through different mechanisms. This knowledge may be useful for future treatment schedules including agents that target the HIF-1 signalling pathway.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 08/2007; 74(2):191-201. · 4.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations highly increase the risk of breast and female adnexal cancer. The role of these genes in the tumorigenesis of other malignancies is still under debate. Borderline ovarian tumors (BOT) are occasionally found in families with a strong history of breast and/or female adnexal cancer with or without proven germline mutations. We investigated whether a BOT arising in a germline BRCA2 mutation carrier could be attributed to this mutation, in which case BOT should be added to the BRCA2 related tumor spectrum. Tumor DNA of a serous borderline ovarian tumor (sBOT) of a 55-year-old female carrier of a pathogenic BRCA2 mutation (6085G>T) was analyzed for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of BRCA2. The sBOT cells, unexpectedly, revealed loss of the mutant allele of BRCA2, while ovarian stroma cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes contained both wild-type and mutant allele of BRCA2. The finding that no loss of the wild-type BRCA2 allele was found in the tumor tissue but loss of the mutant allele was seen suggests that sBOT are not part of the BRCA2 related tumor spectrum. In the literature BOT's in germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are described incidentally, while in patients with a BOT a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is rarely found. Therefore, we conclude that borderline ovarian tumors are neither part of the BRCA1- nor the BRCA2- related tumor spectrum.
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 03/2007; 17(5):1143-7. · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Fanconi anemia and BRCA networks are considered interconnected, as BRCA2 gene defects have been discovered in individuals with Fanconi anemia subtype D1. Here we show that a defect in the BRCA2-interacting protein PALB2 is associated with Fanconi anemia in an individual with a new subtype. PALB2-deficient cells showed hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents and lacked chromatin-bound BRCA2; these defects were corrected upon ectopic expression of PALB2 or by spontaneous reversion.
    Nature Genetics 03/2007; 39(2):159-61. · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To identify the gene underlying Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group I we studied informative FA-I families by a genome-wide linkage analysis, which resulted in 4 candidate regions together encompassing 351 genes. Candidates were selected via bioinformatics and data mining on the basis of their resemblance to other FA genes/proteins acting in the FA pathway, such as: degree of evolutionary conservation, presence of nuclear localization signals and pattern of tissue-dependent expression. We found a candidate, KIAA1794 on chromosome 15q25-26, to be mutated in 8 affected individuals previously assigned to complementation group I. Western blots of endogenous FANCI indicated that functionally active KIAA1794 protein is lacking in FA-I individuals. Knock-down of KIAA1794 expression by siRNA in HeLa cells caused excessive chromosomal breakage induced by mitomycin C, a hallmark of FA cells. Furthermore, phenotypic reversion of a patient-derived cell line was associated with a secondary genetic alteration at the KIAA1794 locus. These data add up to two conclusions. First, KIAA1794 is a FA gene. Second, this gene is identical to FANCI, since the patient cell lines found mutated in this study included the reference cell line for group I, EUFA592.
    Cellular oncology: the official journal of the International Society for Cellular Oncology 02/2007; 29(3):211-8. · 4.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the usefulness of neuronal intranuclear inclusions and neuropil inclusions for the pathological assessment of Huntington's disease (HD), their presence in neocortex was assessed by ubiquitin and N-terminal huntingtin immunohistochemistry in a consecutive series of 195 autopsy brains of individuals with a positive or tentative clinical diagnosis of, or at risk for, HD. The findings were correlated with striatal pathology (n = 190), CAG repeat length (n = 85) and original pathological diagnosis (n = 186). The antibodies detected both these inclusions in 181 patients with HD pathology > or = Vonsattel et al's grade I, five patients lacking striatal tissue for review, and two at-risk individuals with grade 0 and grade I HD pathology, respectively. One patient with HD-like pathology and two patients and four at-risk individuals without HD pathology lacked HD inclusions. In the genetically analyzed cases, the inclusions were exclusively and consistently observed in association with repeat expansion [(CAG)(n) > or = 39, n = 81]. Thirteen inclusion-positive cases, including the grade 0 at-risk individual, had a false negative original pathological diagnosis of HD and four had an unjustly questionable diagnosis. A false positive diagnosis was made in the inclusion-negative case with HD-like pathology. These results indicate that immunohistochemical analysis for HD inclusions facilitates the pathological evaluation of HD and enhances its accuracy.
    Brain Pathology 01/2007; 17(1):31-7. · 4.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the BRCA1 and TP53 genes are early genetic events leading to (hereditary) ovarian carcinoma. The human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) is considered the tissue of origin of at least a subset of these tumours. Therefore, OSE cell cultures derived from women harbouring BRCA1 germline mutations can be a potential model to study hereditary ovarian carcinogenesis. In fact, previous in vitro studies indicate phenotypical differences between OSE from women with and without such germline mutations. Therefore, we have assessed whether differences in the expression of BRCA1 and p53 proteins in cultured OSE cells could contribute to these observations. Thirty-two OSE cultures derived from women harbouring a BRCA1 mutation (Predisposed OSE [POSE]) and ten cultures from women without a cancer predisposition (Non predisposed OSE [NPOSE]) were grown under standard conditions. Immunocytochemistry was performed to assess the expression of the BRCA1- and p53 proteins. Ki67 immunocytochemical expression was assessed to determine possible differences in cell cycle status between the two groups. In addition, to study whether wild type p53 was expressed, induction of p53 by cis-platinum was assessed by Western blot. On the basis of Ki67 expression, three different groups were analyzed. In the group with all cultures that expressed Ki67 no significant difference was observed in BRCA1 (P = 0.19) and p53 expression (P = 0.09). In the group with moderate to high Ki67 expression no difference in BRCA1 expression (P = 0.50) was observed. However, p53 expression was significantly lower in the case group (P = 0.01). The same observation for p53 was made in the group with only high Ki67 expression (P = 0.02). Furthermore, the expression of both BRCA1 and p53 positively correlates with Ki67 expression. In POSE and NPOSE, p53 was induced by cis-platinum to a similar extent. Our study indicates differences in the expression of p53, but not in the expression of BRCA1 between POSE and NPOSE. In addition, our findings do suggest the absence of losses of the wild type BRCA1 and p53 genes in the studied OSE cultures. This indicates that losses in these genes cannot account for observed differences in phenotypical traits between POSE and NPOSE, but that differences in levels of p53 might contribute.
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics 11/2006; 274(6):327-31. · 1.33 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

924 Citations
203.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • VU University Medical Center
      • • Department of Clinical Genetics
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2012
    • China Medical University (PRC)
      • Department of Neurobiology
      Shenyang, Liaoning, China
  • 1999–2012
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Human Genetics
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2007–2008
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Clinical Genetics
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands