J A Yesavage

VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California, United States

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Publications (232)1011.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group.
    PLoS ONE 07/2014; 9(6):e98426. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Agitation is common, persistent, and associated with adverse consequences for patients with Alzheimer disease. Pharmacological treatment options, including antipsychotics are not satisfactory. The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram for agitation in patients with Alzheimer disease. Key secondary objectives examined effects of citalopram on function, caregiver distress, safety, cognitive safety, and tolerability. The Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer Disease Study (CitAD) was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial that enrolled 186 patients with probable Alzheimer disease and clinically significant agitation from 8 academic centers in the United States and Canada from August 2009 to January 2013. Participants (n = 186) were randomized to receive a psychosocial intervention plus either citalopram (n = 94) or placebo (n = 92) for 9 weeks. Dosage began at 10 mg per day with planned titration to 30 mg per day over 3 weeks based on response and tolerability. Primary outcome measures were based on scores from the 18-point Neurobehavioral Rating Scale agitation subscale (NBRS-A) and the modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC). Other outcomes were based on scores from the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), ability to complete activities of daily living (ADLs), caregiver distress, cognitive safety (based on scores from the 30-point Mini Mental State Examination [MMSE]), and adverse events. Participants who received citalopram showed significant improvement compared with those who received placebo on both primary outcome measures. The NBRS-A estimated treatment difference at week 9 (citalopram minus placebo) was -0.93 (95% CI, -1.80 to -0.06), P = .04. Results from the mADCS-CGIC showed 40% of citalopram participants having moderate or marked improvement from baseline compared with 26% of placebo recipients, with estimated treatment effect (odds ratio [OR] of being at or better than a given CGIC category) of 2.13 (95% CI, 1.23-3.69), P = .01. Participants who received citalopram showed significant improvement on the CMAI, total NPI, and caregiver distress scores but not on the NPI agitation subscale, ADLs, or in less use of rescue lorazepam. Worsening of cognition (-1.05 points; 95% CI, -1.97 to -0.13; P = .03) and QT interval prolongation (18.1 ms; 95% CI, 6.1-30.1; P = .01) were seen in the citalopram group. Among patients with probable Alzheimer disease and agitation who were receiving psychosocial intervention, the addition of citalopram compared with placebo significantly reduced agitation and caregiver distress; however, cognitive and cardiac adverse effects of citalopram may limit its practical application at the dosage of 30 mg per day. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00898807.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 02/2014; 311(7):682-91. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease and other related disorders (ADRD) represent a major challenge for health care systems within the aging population. It is therefore important to develop better instruments to assess the disease severity and progression, as well as to improve its treatment, stimulation, and rehabilitation. This is the underlying idea for the development of Serious Games (SG). These are digital applications specially adapted for purposes other than entertaining; such as rehabilitation, training and education. Recently, there has been an increase of interest in the use of SG targeting patients with ADRD. However, this field is completely uncharted, and the clinical, ethical, economic and research impact of the employment of SG in these target populations has never been systematically addressed. The aim of this paper is to systematically analyze the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) of employing SG with patients with ADRD in order to provide practical recommendations for the development and use of SG in these populations. These analyses and recommendations were gathered, commented on and validated during a 2-round workshop in the context of the 2013 Clinical Trial of Alzheimer's Disease (CTAD) conference, and endorsed by stakeholders in the field. The results revealed that SG may offer very useful tools for professionals involved in the care of patients suffering from ADRD. However, more interdisciplinary work should be done in order to create SG specifically targeting these populations. Furthermore, in order to acquire more academic and professional credibility and acceptance, it will be necessary to invest more in research targeting efficacy and feasibility. Finally, the emerging ethical challenges should be considered a priority.
    Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience 01/2014; 6:54. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer disease (AD) and other related dementia represent a major challenge for health care systems within the aging population. It is therefore important to develop better instruments for assessing disease severity and disease progression to optimize patient's care and support to care providers, and also provide better tools for clinical research. In this area, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are of particular interest. Such techniques enable accurate and standardized assessments of patients' performance and actions in real time and real life situations. The aim of this article is to provide basic recommendation concerning the development and the use of ICT for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. During he ICT and Mental Health workshop (CTAD meeting held in Monaco on the 30th October 2012) an expert panel was set up to prepare the first recommendations for the use of ICT in dementia research. The expert panel included geriatrician, epidemiologist, neurologist, psychiatrist, psychologist, ICT engineers, representatives from the industry and patient association. The recommendations are divided into three sections corresponding to 1/ the clinical targets of interest for the use of ICT, 2/ the conditions, the type of sensors and the outputs (scores) that could be used and obtained, 3/ finally the last section concerns specifically the use of ICT within clinical trials.
    The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging 01/2013; 17(8):653-660. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: Cognitive training has been shown to improve memory in older adults; however, little is known about which individuals benefit from or respond best to training in the long term. Identification of responders' characteristics would help providers match cognitive interventions to individuals to improve their effectiveness. Signal detection methods may prove more informative than more commonly used analytic methods. The goal of the current study is to identify baseline characteristics of long-term treatment responders and of those able to maintain their initial benefit from cognitive training. Methods: Participants were 120 non-demented, community-dwelling older adults who had participated in a cognitive training intervention. Tested predictors included both demographic and neurocognitive variables. Primary outcome variables were performance on measures of memory at one-year follow-up. Results: Results of the signal detection analysis indicated that different neurocognitive performances predicted long-term effects of memory training and maintenance of initial treatment response according to different types of to-be-remembered material. Higher baseline scores on tests of associative memory, delayed verbal memory, attention, episodic memory, and younger age were found predictive of long-term response one year later. Higher associative memory scores and lower initial gains at the end of treatment (week 14) predicted successful maintenance of training gains at week 52. Conclusions: To derive long-term benefit from particular cognitive training programs, it appears necessary for older adults to have specific neurocognitive profiles. Further, inclusion of booster sessions to cognitive training programs may assist in maintenance of initial treatment gains.
    International Psychogeriatrics 12/2012; · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots.Method Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40-69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. RESULTS: Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%-12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance.DiscussionIIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance.
    The Journals of Gerontology Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 10/2012; · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a nursing home (NH) staff education to manage apathy in older individuals with a diagnosis of dementia. METHODS: Sixteen NHs agreed to participate, and 230 demented apathetic residents were randomly assigned to the reference group (RG) or the intervention group (IG). IG received a month of weekly 4-h training. Qualitative evaluation was performed through interviews and questionnaires regarding work practices and knowledge about dementia. Quantitative evaluation was at baseline, at the end of the training program (week 4), and 3 months after the end of it with the use of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), the Apathy Inventory, and two observation scales. RESULTS: In the qualitative evaluation, very few staff responded to the questionnaire. Concerning the difficulty that managing residents' behavioral symptoms presented, aggressiveness was ranked as the most difficult behavior to manage and apathy as the least difficult. In the quantitative evaluation, the results are as follows. NPI: the IG scores increased from baseline to week 4 more than the RG for symptoms belonging to the affective and the psychotic NPI item subgroup. Apathy Inventory: there was a significant decrease of the emotional blunting score dimension in the IG. Group Observation Scale: significant improvement was observed for the emotional blunting dimension in the IG only. CONCLUSIONS: Apathy is rarely identified as a problem in NH. Emotional blunting was the only dimension sensitive to change. Failure to improve residents' level of interest could be explained by the difficulties encountered in accessing information regarding the subjects' personal interests. But it remains possible to modify residents' emotional reactivity and staff's perceptions of residents' behaviors and emotions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 06/2012; · 3.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03/2012; 109(10):3985-90. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 03/2012; 109(10):3985-90.
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    D L Bliwise, L M Trotti, J A Yesavage, D B Rye
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    ABSTRACT:   Periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS) are non-epileptiform, repetitive movements of the lower limbs that have been associated with apparent dopamine deficiency. We hypothesized that elderly patients with a disease characterized primarily by dopamine depletion (Parkinsonism) would have higher rates of PLMS than age-matched controls or a different neurodegenerative condition not primarily involving a hypodopaminergic state, Alzheimer's disease (AD).   We compared rates of PLMS derived from in-laboratory overnight polysomnography in patients with Parkinsonism (n = 79), AD (n = 28), and non-neurologically impaired, community-based controls (n = 187).   Patients with Parkinsonism not receiving levodopa had significantly higher rates of PLMS than did patients with Parkinsonism receiving levodopa as well as higher rates than seen in AD and controls. Other medications did not appear to exert the pronounced effect of levodopa on PLMS in this Parkinsonian patient population. The symptom of leg kicking was reported more frequently in Parkinsonism and was associated with higher rates of PLMS. Caregiver reported leg kicking was unrelated to PLMS in AD.  Results are broadly compatible with a dopaminergic hypothesis for PLMS in Parkinsonism. The clinical significance of the negative findings in patients with AD requires further investigation.
    European Journal of Neurology 02/2012; 19(6):918-23. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Agitation is one of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is associated with serious adverse consequences for patients and caregivers. Evidence-supported treatment options for agitation are limited. The citalopram for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (CitAD) study was designed to evaluate the potential of citalopram to ameliorate these symptoms. CitAD is a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled multicenter clinical trial, with two parallel treatment groups assigned in a 1:1 ratio and randomization stratified by clinical center. The study included eight recruiting clinical centers, a chair's office, and a coordinating center located in university settings in the United States and Canada. A total of 200 individuals having probable AD with clinically significant agitation and without major depression were recruited for this study. Patients were randomized to receive citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/d) or matching placebo. Caregivers of patients in both treatment groups received a structured psychosocial therapy. Agitation was compared between treatment groups using the NeuroBehavioral Rating Scale and the AD Cooperative Study- Clinical Global Impression of Change, which are the primary outcomes. Functional performance, cognition, caregiver distress, and rates of adverse and serious adverse events were also measured. The authors believe the design elements in CitAD are important features to be included in trials assessing the safety and efficacy of psychotropic medications for clinically significant agitation in AD.
    Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 02/2012; 8(2):121-30. · 14.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous studies have indicated a link between the presence of polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cognitive and affective disorders. However, only a few have studied these effects longitudinally along with structural changes in the brain. This study was carried out to investigate whether valine-to-methionine substitution at position 66 (val66met) of pro-BDNF could be linked to alterations in the rate of decline in skilled task performance and structural changes in hippocampal volume. Participants consisted of 144 healthy Caucasian pilots (aged 40-69 years) who completed a minimum of 3 consecutive annual visits. Standardized flight simulator score (SFSS) was measured as a reliable and quantifiable indicator for skilled task performance. In addition, a subset of these individuals was assessed for hippocampal volume alterations using magnetic resonance imaging. We found that val66met substitution in BDNF correlated longitudinally with the rate of decline in SFSS. Structurally, age-dependent hippocampal volume changes were also significantly altered by this substitution. Our study suggests that val66met polymorphism in BDNF can be linked to the rate of decline in skilled task performance. Furthermore, this polymorphism could be used as a predictor of the effects of age on the structure of the hippocampus in healthy individuals. Such results have implications for understanding possible disabilities in older adults performing skilled tasks who are at a higher risk for cognitive and affective disorders.Translational Psychiatry (2011) 1, e51; doi:10.1038/tp.2011.47; published online 25 October 2011.
    Translational psychiatry. 10/2011; 1:e51.
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    ABSTRACT: Apathy is the most frequently reported neuropsychiatric symptom across all stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both apathy and sleep disorders are known to have independent negative effects on the quality of life in individuals with AD. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between apathy and sleep/wake patterns in individuals with AD using ambulatory actigraphy. One hundred and three non-institutionalized individuals with AD wore a wrist actigraph continuously over seven consecutive 24-h periods. Apathy was assessed using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Daytime mean motor activity (dMMA) was calculated from daytime wrist actigraphy data. Actigraphic parameters of sleep included total sleep time (TST), wake after sleep onset (WASO), time in bed (TIB), WASO normalized by TIB, sleep latency, and nighttime mean motor activity (nMMA). Among the 103 individuals with AD (aged 76.9 ± 7.2 years; MMSE = 21.4 ± 4.3), those with apathy had significantly lower dMMA, higher WASO (both raw and normalized), and spent more time in bed during the night than those without apathy. Sleep latency, nMMA and TST did not differ significantly between the two subgroups. To our knowledge, this study is the first to identify a relationship between apathy and sleep disturbance in those with mild or moderate AD: apathy was associated with increased TIB during the night and more WASO. These results suggest that AD patients with apathy have less consolidated nocturnal sleep than those without apathy.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 02/2011; 25(1):85-91. · 4.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) may provide a precise and reliable assessment of the extent and severity of neural tissue loss caused by various diseases. In particular, the N-Acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Creatine (Cr) ratio has been found to be an indicator of the degree of neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Memantine is thought to benefit the AD brain by stabilizing the NMDA receptors on neurons in turn reducing excitotoxicity. Despite its effectiveness in treating moderate to severe AD, memantine has not had similar success in the treatment of mildly demented AD patients. The objective of this study was to test whether memantine would slow or prevent the loss of neurons in mild to moderate AD patients. A double-blind placebo-controlled study was designed to measure the effect of a year-long course of memantine in patients with a probable AD diagnosis with mild to moderate dementia. The primary outcome measure was stipulated to be change in MRS NAA/Cr ratio in inferior parietal cortex in memantine relative to the placebo treatment condition. The secondary outcome measures were changes in cognitive and function scale scores. This pilot study failed to demonstrate a benefit of memantine on the primary outcome measure, the inferior parietal NAA/Cr ratio, or the secondary outcome measures. More studies are needed to determine the effect of memantine on regions of the brain significantly affected by AD pathology.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 01/2011; 26 Suppl 3:331-6. · 4.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The polymorphic variation in the val158met position of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene is associated with differences in executive performance, processing speed, and attention. The purpose of this study is: (1) replicate previous COMT val158met findings on cognitive performance; (2) determine whether COMT val158met effects extend to a real-world task, aircraft navigation performance in a flight simulator; and (3) determine if aviation expertise moderates any effect of COMT val158met status on flight simulator performance. One hundred seventy two pilots aged 41-69 years, who varied in level of aviation training and experience, completed flight simulator, cognitive, and genetic assessments. Results indicate that although no COMT effect was found for an overall measure of flight performance, a positive effect of the met allele was detected for two aspects of cognitive ability: executive functioning and working memory performance. Pilots with the met/met genotype benefited more from increased levels of expertise than other participants on a traffic avoidance measure, which is a component of flight simulator performance. These preliminary results indicate that COMT val158met polymorphic variation can affect a real-world task.
    Behavior Genetics 12/2010; 41(5):700-8. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have consistently reported age-related changes in cognitive abilities and brain structure. Previous studies also suggest compensatory roles for specialized training, skill, and years of education in the age-related decline of cognitive function. The Stanford/VA Aviation Study examines the influence of specialized training and skill level (expertise) on age-related changes in cognition and brain structure. This preliminary report examines the effect of aviation expertise, years of education, age, and brain size on flight simulator performance in pilots aged 45-68 years. Fifty-one pilots were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging, flight simulator, and processing speed tasks. There were significant main effects of age (p < .01) and expertise (p < .01), but not of whole brain size (p > .1) or education (p > .1), on flight simulator performance. However, even though age and brain size were correlated (r = -0.41), age differences in flight simulator performance were not explained by brain size. Both aviation expertise and education were involved in an interaction with brain size in predicting flight simulator performance (p < .05). These results point to the importance of examining measures of expertise and their interactions to assess age-related cognitive changes.
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 03/2010; 16(3):412-23. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Sleep disturbance is common in caregivers of older adults with memory disorders. Little is known, however, about the implications of caregivers’ poor sleep with regard to their physical functioning.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between objectively measured sleep and self-reported physical functioning in 45 caregivers (mean age = 68.6 years) who completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36, and the Mini-mental State Examination, and wore an actigraph for at least three days. Our primary predictors were actigraphic sleep parameters, and our outcome was the SF-36 Physical Functioning subscale.Results: In multivariate-adjusted linear regression analyses, each 30-minute increase in caregivers’ total sleep time was associated with a 2.2-point improvement in their Physical Functioning subscale scores (unstandardized regression coefficient (B) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0–3.4, p = 0.001). In addition, each 10-minute increase in time awake after initial sleep onset was associated with a 0.5-point decrease on the Physical Functioning subscale, although this was not statistically significant (B = −0.5, 95% CI −1.1, 0.1, p = 0.09).Conclusions: Our findings suggest that shorter sleep duration is associated with worse self-reported physical functioning in caregivers. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether poor sleep predicts functional decline in caregivers.
    International Psychogeriatrics 02/2010; 22(02):306 - 311. · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep and wake in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often fragmented as manifested by bouts of wakefulness at night and napping during the day. Management of sleep disturbances in AD is important because of their negative impact on both patients and caregivers. Pharmacological treatments, mainly sedative-hypnotics and antipsychotics, are often used but can be associated with significant adverse effects. Non-pharmacological treatments represent a beneficial alternative approach to the management of sleep disturbances in AD since they are associated with fewer adverse effects and their efficacy can be sustained after treatment has been completed. The aim of this article is to review non-pharmacological treatments, such as sleep hygiene, sleep restriction therapy (SRT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), for the management of sleep/wake disturbances in AD.
    The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging 01/2010; 14(3):203-6. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimers & Dementia - ALZHEIMERS DEMENT. 01/2010; 6(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: Apathy is one of the most common behavioral symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between apathy and locomotor activity in mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD).Methods: Thirty AD subjects and fifteen healthy controls were recruited from the Nice Memory Center. Apathy was assessed with the Apathy Inventory (AI). Patients with a score greater than three on the AI caregiver version are considered in this report as having apathy. Locomotor activity was assessed using a wrist-worn actigraph for 75 minutes, during which a neuropsychological and behavioral examination were performed (60 minutes) followed by 15 minutes of free activity. Results: AD patients shown lower motor activity than healthy subjects. AD patients with apathy had lower motor activity than AD patients without apathy. Apathy total score correlated negatively with mean motor activity. Most of the total score correlation was accounted for by correlations between the apathy dimensions lack of initiative and lack of interest, with mean motor activity.Conclusion: Ambulatory actigraphy could be a simple technique to assess apathy objectively as part of routine assessment of AD patients.
    Dementia 01/2010; 9(4):509-516.

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,011.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2013
    • VA Palo Alto Health Care System
      • War Related Illness and Injury Study Center (WRIISC)
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 2012
    • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 1989–2012
    • Stanford Medicine
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
      • • Stanford School of Medicine
      Stanford, California, United States
    • Mountain View Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
      Menlo Park, California, United States
  • 1987–2012
    • Stanford University
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
      • • Department of Medicine
      Palo Alto, California, United States
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Psychology
      Saint Louis, MO, United States
  • 2006
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
      Durham, NC, United States
  • 1997–2005
    • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • University of Southern California
      • Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics & Policy
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 2004
    • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
      • Department of Psychiatry III
      Thessaloníki, Kentriki Makedonia, Greece
  • 1999
    • McGill University
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 1994
    • Grinnell College
      • Department of Psychology
      Iowa City, IA, United States
  • 1990
    • Palo Alto Medical Foundation
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1988
    • University of Utah
      • Department of Educational Psychology
      Salt Lake City, UT, United States
  • 1985
    • Palo Alto Research Center
      Palo Alto, California, United States