Laura Renkonen-Sinisalo

Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland

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Publications (22)157.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background:Genes with recurrent codon-specific somatic mutations are likely drivers of tumorigenesis and potential therapeutic targets. Hypermutable cancers may represent a sensitive system for generation and selection of oncogenic mutations.Methods:We utilised exome-sequencing data on 25 sporadic microsatellite-instable (MSI) colorectal cancers (CRCs) and searched for base-specific somatic mutation hotspots.Results:We identified novel mutation hotspots in 33 genes. Fourteen genes displayed mutations in the validation set of 254 MSI CRCs: ANTXR1, MORC2, CEP135, CRYBB1, GALNT9, KRT82, PI15, SLC36A1, CNTF, GLDC, MBTPS1, OR9Q2, R3HDM1 and TTPAL. A database search found examples of the hotspot mutations in multiple cancer types.Conclusions:This work reveals a variety of new recurrent candidate oncogene mutations to be further scrutinised as potential therapeutic targets.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 12 August 2014; doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.429 www.bjcancer.com.
    British journal of cancer. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: ARID1A has been identified as a novel tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer and subsequently in various other tumor types. ARID1A belongs to the ARID domain containing gene family, which comprises of 15 genes involved e.g. in transcriptional regulation, proliferation, and chromatin remodeling. In this study, we utilized exome sequencing data to analyze the mutation frequency of all the ARID domain containing genes in 25 microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers (CRCs) as a first systematic effort to characterize the mutation pattern of the whole ARID gene family. Genes which fulfilled the selection criteria in this discovery set (mutations in at least 4/25 (16%) samples, including at least one nonsense or splice site mutation) were chosen for further analysis in an independent validation set of 21 MSI CRCs. We found that in addition to ARID1A, which was mutated in 39% of the tumors (18/46), also ARID1B (13%, 6/46), ARID2 (13%, 6/46), and ARID4A (20%, 9/46) were frequently mutated. In all these genes the mutations were distributed along the entire length of the gene, thus distinguishing them from typical MSI target genes previously described. Our results indicate that in addition to ARID1A, other members of the ARID gene family may play a role in MSI CRC. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 12/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor
  • L Koskenvuo, L Renkonen-Sinisalo, H J Järvinen, A Lepistö
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our retrospective study was to review the outcome of patients undergoing colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) due to familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) in Finland during the last 50 years. The cumulative risk of rectal cancer and the rate of anus preservation were analyzed. A total of 140 FAP patients with previous colectomy combined with ileorectal anastomosis were included. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to evaluate cumulative risks. Secondary proctectomy was performed for 39 (28 %) of 140 patients. The cumulative risk of secondary proctectomy was 53 % at 30 years after colectomy with IRA. A total of 17 (44 %) secondary proctectomies were performed due to cancer or suspicion of cancer, and another 17 (44 %) secondary proctectomies were performed due to uncontrollable rectal polyposis. During our study, the anus preservation rate in secondary proctectomies was 49 %. The cumulative risk of rectal cancer was 24 % at 30 years after colectomy with IRA. Therefore, the cumulative rectal cancer mortality 30 years after colectomy with IRA was 9 %. Proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) should be favored as a primary operation for patients not having technical or medical contraindications for it because colectomy with IRA carried a rectal cancer risk of 13 % with a mortality of 7 % during our study, and because IPAA is likely to succeed better at earlier phase of the disease. Patients with attenuated FAP had no rectal cancer in our study, and they may form a group where IRA should still be the first choice as an exception.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 11/2013; · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hereditary factors are presumed to play a role in one third of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. However, in the majority of familial CRC cases the genetic basis of predisposition remains unexplained. This is particularly true for families with few affected individuals. To identify susceptibility genes for this common phenotype, we examined familial cases derived from a consecutive series of 1514 Finnish CRC patients. Ninety-six familial CRC patients with no previous diagnosis of a hereditary CRC syndrome were included in the analysis. Eighty-six patients had one affected first-degree relative, and ten patients had two or more. Exome sequencing was utilized to search for genes harboring putative loss-of-function variants, because such alterations are likely candidates for disease-causing mutations. Eleven genes with rare truncating variants in two or three familial CRC cases were identified: UACA, SFXN4, TWSG1, PSPH, NUDT7, ZNF490, PRSS37, CCDC18, PRADC1, MRPL3, and AKR1C4. Loss of heterozygosity was examined in all respective cancer samples, and was detected in seven occasions involving four of the candidate genes. In all seven occasions the wild-type allele was lost (P = 0.0078) providing additional evidence that these eleven genes are likely to include true culprits. The study provides a set of candidate predisposition genes which may explain a subset of common familial CRC. Additional genetic validation in other populations is required to provide firm evidence for causality, as well as to characterize the natural history of the respective phenotypes.
    PLoS Genetics 10/2013; 9(10):e1003876. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian carcinoma in Lynch syndrome (LS) is associated with unexpectedly high survival; yet, beyond DNA mismatch repair (MMR) defects, the developmental mechanisms are unknown. We used established (genetic) and new (epigenetic) classifiers of ovarian cancer to explore similarities and differences between LS-associated and sporadic diseases. To this end, all available ovarian carcinomas (n = 20) from MMR gene mutation carriers ascertained through a nation-wide registry and 87 sporadic ovarian carcinomas of the main histological types were molecularly profiled. LS-ovarian carcinomas were mostly of nonserous histology (12 endometrioid, seven clear cell and one serous), diagnosed at a mean age of 45.7 years, and associated with a 10-year survival of 87%. Among LS-ovarian carcinomas, 19/20 (95%) were MMR-deficient vs. 11/87 (13%) among sporadic cases (p < 0.0001). In a striking contrast to the sporadic cases, the expression of p53 was normal and KRAS/BRAF mutations absent in all LS-ovarian carcinomas. PIK3CA mutations, suggested to be a favorable prognostic factor, occurred with a frequency of 6/20 (30%), which was comparable to sporadic tumors of endometrioid or clear cell type. Tumor suppressor genes were more frequently methylated and LINE-1 hypomethylation less common in LS-ovarian carcinomas compared to their sporadic counterparts. The patterns of genetic and epigenetic alterations reflected the origin as LS vs. sporadic cases on one hand and the histological type on the other hand. In conclusion, the significant molecular differences observed between LS-associated and sporadic ovarian carcinomas help explain the different behavior of these tumors and emphasize the need for tailored clinical management.
    International Journal of Cancer 05/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    Gastroenterology 05/2013; · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective. Early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC), defined here as age of onset less than 40 years, develops frequently in genetically predisposed individuals. Next-generation sequencing is an increasingly available option in the diagnostic workup of suspected hereditary susceptibility, but little is known about the practical feasibility and additional diagnostic yield of the technology in this patient group. Materials and methods. We analyzed 38 young CRC patients derived from a set of 1514 CRC cases. All 38 tumors had been tested in our laboratory for microsatellite instability (MSI), and Sanger sequencing had been used to screen for MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in MSI cases. Also, gastrointestinal polyposis had been diagnosed clinically and molecularly. Family histories were acquired from national registries. If inherited syndromes had not been diagnosed in routine diagnostic efforts (n = 23), normal tissue DNA was analyzed for mutations in a comprehensive set of high-penetrance genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD4, BMPR1A, LKB1/STK11, and PTEN) by exome sequencing. Results. CRC predisposition syndromes were confirmed in 42% (16/38) of early-onset CRC patients. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 12 (32%) patients, familial adenomatous polyposis in three (7.9%), and juvenile polyposis in one (2.6%) patient. Exome sequencing revealed one additional MLH1 mutation. Over half of the patients had advanced cancers (Dukes C or D, 61%, 23/38). The majority of nonsyndromic patients had unaffected first-degree relatives and microsatellite-stable tumors. Conclusions. Microsatellite instability positivity or gastrointestinal polyposis characterized all patients with unambiguous highly penetrant germline mutations. In our series, exome sequencing produced little added value in diagnosing the underlying predisposition conditions.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 04/2013; · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lynch syndrome (LS) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In 2007, a group of European experts (the Mallorca group) published guidelines for the clinical management of LS. Since then substantial new information has become available necessitating an update of the guidelines. In 2011 and 2012 workshops were organised in Palma de Mallorca. A total of 35 specialists from 13 countries participated in the meetings. The first step was to formulate important clinical questions. Then a systematic literature search was performed using the Pubmed database and manual searches of relevant articles. During the workshops the outcome of the literature search was discussed in detail. The guidelines described in this paper may be helpful for the appropriate management of families with LS. Prospective controlled studies should be undertaken to improve further the care of these families.
    Gut 02/2013; · 10.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed a meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies to identify common variants influencing colorectal cancer (CRC) risk comprising 8,682 cases and 9,649 controls. Replication analysis was performed in case-control sets totaling 21,096 cases and 19,555 controls. We identified three new CRC risk loci at 6p21 (rs1321311, near CDKN1A; P = 1.14 × 10(-10)), 11q13.4 (rs3824999, intronic to POLD3; P = 3.65 × 10(-10)) and Xp22.2 (rs5934683, near SHROOM2; P = 7.30 × 10(-10)) This brings the number of independent loci associated with CRC risk to 20 and provides further insight into the genetic architecture of inherited susceptibility to CRC.
    Nature Genetics 05/2012; 44(7):770-6. · 35.21 Impact Factor
  • Nat. Genet. 01/2012; 44(7):770-776.
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    ABSTRACT: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS, MIM175200) is an autosomal dominant condition defined by the development of characteristic polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract and mucocutaneous pigmentation. The majority of patients that meet the clinical diagnostic criteria have a causative mutation in the STK11 gene, which is located at 19p13.3. The cancer risks in this condition are substantial, particularly for breast and gastrointestinal cancer, although ascertainment and publication bias may have led to overestimates in some publications. Current surveillance protocols are controversial and not evidence-based, due to the relative rarity of the condition. Initially, endoscopies are more likely to be done to detect polyps that may be a risk for future intussusception or obstruction rather than cancers, but surveillance for the various cancers for which these patients are susceptible is an important part of their later management. This review assesses the current literature on the clinical features and management of the condition, genotype-phenotype studies, and suggested guidelines for surveillance and management of individuals with PJS. The proposed guidelines contained in this article have been produced as a consensus statement on behalf of a group of European experts who met in Mallorca in 2007 and who have produced guidelines on the clinical management of Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis.
    Gut 07/2010; 59(7):975-86. · 10.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is common in the population and the most frequent extracolonic malignancy in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)/Lynch syndrome. We characterized precursor lesions of endometrioid EC to identify markers of malignant transformation and tumor progression. Serial specimens of normal endometrium, simple hyperplasia, complex hyperplasia without atypia, complex hyperplasia with atypia, and endometrial carcinoma obtained during a 10-year surveillance of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers (together 110 samples) were molecularly profiled and compared with a sporadic reference series of endometrial specimens taken for nonmalignant reasons (62 samples). Among MMR gene mutation carriers, decreased MMR protein expression was present in 7% in normal endometrium, 40% in simple hyperplasia, 100% in complex hyperplasia without atypia, 92% in complex hyperplasia with atypia, and 100% in endometrial carcinoma. Microsatellite instability frequencies were lower (6%, 17%, 67%, 38%, and 64%, respectively). Among 24 tumor suppressor genes, the number of methylated loci increased from normal endometrium to simple hyperplasia to complex hyperplasia (complex hyperplasia without atypia/complex hyperplasia with atypia) in both Lynch syndrome and reference series. The most frequently methylated genes were CDH13, RASSF1A, and GSTP1. In MMR gene mutation carriers, MMR and methylation defects appeared up to 12 years before endometrial carcinoma. Molecular changes in endometrial tissue are detectable several years before endometrial carcinoma in genetically predisposed individuals. Abnormal MMR and methylation classify normal endometrium and simple hyperplasia into one category and complex hyperplasia without atypia, complex hyperplasia with atypia, and endometrial carcinoma into another, suggesting that, contrary to a traditional view, complex hyperplasia without atypia and complex hyperplasia with atypia are equally important as precursor lesions of endometrial carcinoma.
    Clinical Cancer Research 10/2009; 15(18):5772-83. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Colonoscopies with polypectomies and endometrial biopsies with transvaginal ultrasonography, repeated at 2- to 3-year intervals, are performed for prevention or early detection of cancer in patients with DNA mismatch repair gene mutation causing Lynch syndrome. The long-term effectiveness of surveillance was evaluated in Lynch syndrome family members tested approximately 10 years ago. Cancer incidence and survival were determined after an 11.5-year follow-up in 242 mutation-positive and 367 mutation-negative participants. These participants in 57 Lynch syndrome families with 14 different mutations were at 50% risk. The median age was 36 years (range, 18 to 72 years) in mutation carriers and 42 years (range, 18 to 72 years) in mutation-negative participants, and none had had cancer of the Lynch syndrome type. Compliance was 95.9% for the colonic surveillance and 97.1% for the gynecologic surveillance. Colorectal cancer (CRC) occurred in 30 mutation-positive participants, and 74 participants had adenomas removed. Three patients died of CRC. Endometrial cancer (EC) occurred in 19 of 103 women at risk, and 48 women had prophylactic hysterectomy. Six of 112 women at risk had ovarian cancer. The overall cancer risk ratio (RR) in mutation carriers was 5.80 (95% CI, 3.4 to 9.5). Cancer mortality rate (RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 0.82 to 6.31) and overall death rate (RR = 1.26; 95% CI, 0.65 to 2.46) were not significantly increased. Long-term compliance in surveillance for CRC and EC exceeded 95% in Lynch syndrome. All CRC deaths were not prevented as a result of noncompliance or missed lesions. Still, after 10 years of surveillance, no significant increase in mortality had occurred compared with mutation-negative relatives.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2009; 27(28):4793-7. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Familial colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 10-15% of all CRCs. In about 5% of all cases, CRC is associated with a highly penetrant dominant inherited syndrome. The most common inherited form of non-polyposis CRC is the Lynch syndrome which is responsible for about 2-4% of all cases. Surveillance of individuals at high risk for CRC prevents the development of advanced CRC. About 1 million individuals in Western Europe are at risk for Lynch syndrome. We performed a survey to evaluate the strategies currently used to identify individuals at high risk for CRC in 14 Western European countries. Questionnaires were distributed amongst members of a European collaborative group of experts that aims to improve the prognosis of families with hereditary CRC. The survey showed that in all countries obtaining a family history followed by referral to clinical genetics centres of suspected cases was the main strategy to identify familial and hereditary CRC. In five out of seven countries with a (regional or national) CRC population screening program, attention was paid in the program to the detection of familial CRC. In only one country were special campaigns organized to increase the awareness of familial CRC among the general population. In almost all countries, the family history is assessed when a patient visits a general practitioner or hospital. However, the quality of family history taking was felt to be rather poor. Microsatellite instability testing (MSI) or immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) of CRC are usually recommended as tools to select high-risk patients for genetic testing and are performed in most countries in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome. In one country, IHC was recommended in all new cases of CRC. In most countries there are no specific programs on cancer genetics in the teaching curriculum for medical doctors. In conclusion, the outcome of this survey and the discussions within an European expert group may be used to improve the strategies to identify individuals at high risk of CRC. More attention should be given to increasing the awareness of the general population of hereditary CRC. Immunohistochemical analysis or MSI-analysis of all CRCs may be an effective tool for identifying all Lynch syndrome families. The cost-effectiveness of this approach should be further evaluated. All countries with a CRC population screening program should obtain a full family history as part of patient assessment.
    Familial Cancer 09/2009; 9(2):109-15. · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Women with a germline mutation in one of the MMR genes MLH1, MSH2 or MSH6 reportedly have 4-12% lifetime risk of ovarian cancer, but there is limited knowledge on survival. Prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (PBSO) has been suggested for preventing this condition. The purpose of this retrospective multicentre study was to describe survival in carriers of pathogenic mutations in one of the MMR genes, and who had contracted ovarian cancer. Women who had ovarian cancer, and who tested positive for or were obligate carriers of an MMR mutation, were included from 11 European centres for hereditary cancer. Most women had not attended for gynaecological screening. Crude and disease specific survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier algorithm. Among the 144 women included, 81.5% had FIGO stage 1 or 2 at diagnosis. 10 year ovarian cancer specific survival independent of staging was 80.6%, compared to less than 40% that is reported both in population based series and in BRCA mutation carriers. Disease specific 30 year survival for ovarian cancer was 71.5%, and for all hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC)/Lynch syndrome related cancers including ovarian cancer it was 47.3%. In the series examined, infiltrating ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome had a better prognosis than infiltrating ovarian cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers or in the general population. Lifetime risk of ovarian cancer of about 10% and a risk of dying of ovarian cancer of 20% gave a lifetime risk of dying of ovarian cancer of about 2% in female MMR mutation carriers.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 08/2009; 47(2):99-102. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a well-described inherited syndrome, which is responsible for <1% of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. The syndrome is characterised by the development of hundreds to thousands of adenomas in the colorectum. Almost all patients will develop CRC if they are not identified and treated at an early stage. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and caused by mutations in the APC gene. Recently, a second gene has been identified that also gives rise to colonic adenomatous polyposis, although the phenotype is less severe than typical FAP. The gene is the MUTYH gene and the inheritance is autosomal recessive. In April 2006 and February 2007, a workshop was organised in Mallorca by European experts on hereditary gastrointestinal cancer aiming to establish guidelines for the clinical management of FAP and to initiate collaborative studies. Thirty-one experts from nine European countries participated in these workshops. Prior to the meeting, various participants examined the most important management issues according to the latest publications. A systematic literature search using Pubmed and reference lists of retrieved articles, and manual searches of relevant articles, was performed. During the workshop, all recommendations were discussed in detail. Because most of the studies that form the basis for the recommendations were descriptive and/or retrospective in nature, many of them were based on expert opinion. The guidelines described herein may be helpful in the appropriate management of FAP families. In order to improve the care of these families further, prospective controlled studies should be undertaken.
    Gut 05/2008; 57(5):704-13. · 10.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The discovery of these genes, 15 years ago, has led to the identification of large numbers of affected families. In April 2006, a workshop was organised by a group of European experts in hereditary gastrointestinal cancer (the Mallorca-group), aiming to establish guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome. 21 experts from nine European countries participated in this workshop. Prior to the meeting, various participants prepared the key management issues of debate according to the latest publications. A systematic literature search using Pubmed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews reference lists of retrieved articles and manual searches of relevant articles was performed. During the workshop, all recommendations were discussed in detail. Because most of the studies that form the basis for the recommendations were descriptive and/or retrospective in nature, many of them were based on expert opinion. The guidelines described in this manuscript may be helpful for the appropriate management of families with Lynch syndrome. Prospective controlled studies should be undertaken to improve further the care of these families.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 07/2007; 44(6):353-62. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The estimated lifetime risk for endometrial carcinoma (EC) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC) is 32-60%, thus supporting surveillance. The survival rate of EC patients is, however, favourable questioning the need for surveillance. Yet, the effectiveness of gynecological surveillance remains to be shown. The 2 previously published studies were based on transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) alone. Intrauterine biopsy has not been tested in surveillance for EC in HNPCC families. The effect of gynecological surveillance was evaluated among 175 Finnish mutation carriers. During 759 person years at risk, there were 503 surveillance visits including TVUS and intrauterine biopsy of endometrium at 94% and 74% of the visits, respectively. EC occurred in 14 cases, 11 of which were diagnosed by surveillance, 8 by intrauterine biopsies. TVUS indicated only 4 EC patients but missed 6 other cases. Intrauterine sampling detected 14 additional cases of potentially premalignant hyperplasia. The stage distribution and survival tended to be more favorable in the 14 EC cases of the surveilled group (no deaths) than in the group of 83 symptomatic mutation carriers of whom 6 died of EC, but with no statistical significance. Four cases of ovarian cancer occurred but none was detected by surveillance in TVUS examinations. In conclusion, EC surveillance in HNPCC seems more effective with endometrial biopsies than with TVUS alone. A definite improvement in survival remains to be shown. The detection of early cancer stages and premalignant lesions offers the opportunity to avoid extensive adjuvant treatment.
    International Journal of Cancer 03/2007; 120(4):821-4. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is suggested to be an alternative to colonoscopy as a surveillance tool in subjects with a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). To evaluate the utility of CTC we successively examined 78 subjects, all with a DNA mismatch repair gene mutation, by CTC and colonoscopy. We detected altogether 37 polyps or tumors in 28 subjects (prevalence 35.9%), adenomas in 13 subjects (16.7%), CRC in two (2.6%), and hyperplastic polyps in 13 (16.7%). A great majority of the polyps were diminutive. The per-patient sensitivity for detecting all lesions with CTC was 0.25 and 0.29 by two radiologists and the specificities 0.82 and 0.76. For lesions of 10 mm or larger the sensitivities were 0.6 and 1.0 and the specificities 0.96 by each examiner. Each diagnosed the two cancers correctly. We concluded that CTC has an acceptable accuracy for large lesions in the colon but the detection rate for small polyps is not comparable to that in colonoscopy. Therefore CTC remains a second choice in surveillance for use when colonoscopy for some reason is incomplete or unsuitable.
    Familial Cancer 02/2007; 6(1):135-40. · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The DNA mismatch repair gene mutations underlying hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC) also predispose, besides colorectal and endometrial cancer, to gastric cancer. usually of the intestinal type. The carcinogenetic pathway behind the elevated gastric cancer risk is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any premalignant lesions to search for in gastric surveillance in HNPCC by comparing gastric histopathology between mutation-positive and mutation-negative family members. We searched for differences in occurrence of Helicobacter pylori, inflammation, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplastic changes. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed for 73 mutation-positive and 32 mutation-negative family members. One case of duodenal cancer was detected in the mutation-positive group, but no gastric neoplastic lesions were seen in either group. There were no differences in the occurrence of polyps, H. pylori, inflammation, activity, atrophy nor intestinal metaplasia tested with binaric, logistic, regression analysis. We conclude that surveillance gastroscopy may not be beneficial in HNPCC, since neither cases of early cancer nor premalignant lesions could be detected in our series of 73 mutation-positive subjects.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 06/2002; 37(5):574-7. · 2.33 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

861 Citations
157.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2014
    • Helsinki University Central Hospital
      • Department of Surgery
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
  • 2013
    • Hospital District for Helsinki and Uusimaa
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
    • University of Helsinki
      • Department of Medical Genetics
      Helsinki, Province of Southern Finland, Finland