Miodrag Krstić

University of Belgrade, Belgrade, SE, Serbia

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Publications (45)72.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiology is a study of disease variations by geography, population demographics and time. Temporal influences can manifest themselves as age effects, period effects, cohort effects, seasonal or monthly variations. The acquisition of Helicobacter pylori infection during early childhood and the ensuing risk for the future development of peptic ulcer or gastric cancer represents a typical example for a cohort effect in digestive diseases. The incidence and prevalence of uncomplicated peptic ulcer have decreased in recent years, largely because of the availability of treatment to eradicate H. pylori and the decreasing prevalence of H. pylori infection. Nowadays, gastric and duodenal ulcers tend to occur in older people, who were more likely to have been exposed to H. pylori in their childhood than recently born generations. The overall incidence of gastric cancers is declining; however, there has been a relative increase in the incidence of tumors of the esophagogastric junction and gastric cardia. Thus, by extrapolating the strong, stable and consistent mortality rate declines in recent decades, gastric cancer was projected to become increasingly less important as a cause of death in Europe in the next decades. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Digestive Diseases 01/2014; 32(3):213-6. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACGROUND/AIM: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic, idiopathic, inflammatory diseases of the digestive tract. The aim of this study was to determine a possible correlation between the clinical parameters of the disease activity degree and the presence of extraintestinal manifestations with disease activity histopathological degree, in patients presented with CD and UC. This cross-sectional study included 134 patients (67 with CD and UC, respectively) treated at the Clinic of Gastroenterology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade. After clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, histopathologic and radiologic diagnostics, the patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological activity. The group I comprised 79 patients whose values of five-grade histopathological activity were less than 5 (45 with CD and 34 with UC), while the group II consisted of 55 patients with the values higher than 5 (22 with CD and 33 with UC). The CD activity index (CDAI) and Truelove and Witts' scale of UC were used for clinical evaluation of the disease activity. CD extraintestinal manifestations were present in 28.9% and 63.6% of the patients in the groups I and II, respectively (p < 0.05). Comparison of the mean CDAI values found a significant difference between these two patients groups (the group I: 190.0 +/- 83.0, the group II: 263.4 +/- 97.6; p < 0.05). No correlation of extraintestinal manifestations of the disease, Truelove and Witts' scale and histological activity was found in UC patients (p > 0.05). In the patients presented with CD, the extraintestinal manifestations with higher CDAI suggested a higher degree of histopathological activity. On the contrary, in the UC patients, Truelove and Witts' scale and extraintestinal manifestations were not valid predictors of the disease histopathological activity.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 10/2013; 70(10):947-52. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To translate into Serbian and to investigate the validity of the cross-culturally adapted the chronic liver disease questionnaire (CLDQ). The questionnaire was validated in 103 consecutive CLD patients treated between October 2009 and October 2010 at the Clinic for Gastroenterology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade (Serbia). Exclusion criteria were: age < 18 years, psychiatric disorders, acute complications of CLD (acute liver failure, variceal bleeding, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis), hepatic encephalopathy (grade > 2) and liver transplantation. Evaluation of the CLDQ was done based on the following parameters: (1) acceptance is shown by the proportion of missing items; (2) internal reliabilities were assessed for multiple item scales by using Cronbach alpha coefficient; and (3) in order to assess whether the allocation of items in the domain corresponds to their distribution in the original questionnaire (construction validity), an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Discriminatory validity was determined by comparing the corresponding CLDQ score/sub-score in patients with different severity of the diseases. The Serbian version of CLDQ questionnaire completed 98% patients. Proportion of missing items was 0.06%. The total time needed to fill the questionnaire was ranged from 8 to 15 min. Assistance in completing the questionnaire required 4.8% patients, while 2.9% needed help in reading, and 1.9% involved writing assistance. The mean age of the selected patients was 53.8 ± 12.9 years and 54.4% were men. Average CLDQ score was 4.62 ± 1.11. Cronbach's alpha for the whole scale was 0.93. Reliability for all domains was above 0.70, except for the domain "Activity" (0.49). The exploratory factor analysis model revealed 6 factors with eigenvalue of greater than 1, explaining 69.7% of cumulative variance. The majority of the items (66%) in the Serbian version of the CLDQ presented the highest loading weight in the domain assigned by the CLDQ developers: "Fatigue" (5/5), "Emotional function" (6/8), "Worry" (5/5), "Abdominal symptoms" (0/3), "Activity" (0/3), "Systemic symptoms" (3/5). The scales "Fatigue" and "Worry" fully corresponded to the original. The factor analysis also revealed that the factors "Activity" and "Abdominal symptoms" could not be replicated, and two new domains "Sleep" and "Nutrition" were established. Analysis of the CLDQ score/sub-score distribution according to disease severity demonstrated that patients without cirrhosis had lower total CLDQ score (4.86 ± 1.05) than those with cirrhosis Child's C (4.31 ± 0.97). Statistically significant difference was detected for the domains "Abdominal symptoms" [F (3) = 5.818, P = 0.001] and "Fatigue" [F (3) = 3.39, P = 0.021]. Post hoc analysis revealed that patients with liver cirrhosis Child's C had significantly lower sub-score "Abdominal symptoms" than patients without cirrhosis or liver cirrhosis Child's A or B. For domain "Fatigue", patients with cirrhosis Child's C had significantly lower score, than non-cirrhotic patients. The Serbian version of CLDQ is well accepted and represents a valid and reliable instrument in Serbian sample of CLD patients.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 08/2013; 19(30):4950-7. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ursodeoxycholic acid is administered to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-mediated liver disease with unknown aetiology. Despite its controversial effects, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its usage for primary biliary cirrhosis. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. We searched for eligible randomised trials in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, Clinicaltrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The literature search was performed until January 2012. Randomised clinical trials assessing the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid versus placebo or 'no intervention' in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Two authors independently extracted data. Continuous data were analysed using mean difference (MD) and standardised mean difference (SMD). Dichotomous data were analysed using risk ratio (RR). Meta-analyses were conducted using both a random-effects model and a fixed-effect model, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Random-effects model meta-regression was used to assess the effects of covariates across the trials. Trial sequential analysis was used to assess risk of random errors (play of chance). Risks of bias (systematic error) in the included trials were assessed according to Cochrane methodology bias domains. Sixteen randomised clinical trials with 1447 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were included. One trial had low risk of bias, and the remaining fifteen had high risk of bias. Fourteen trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with placebo and two trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with 'no intervention'. The percentage of patients with advanced primary biliary cirrhosis at baseline varied from 15% to 83%, with a median of 51%. The duration of the trials varied from 3 to 92 months, with a median of 24 months. The results showed no significant difference in effect between ursodeoxycholic acid and placebo or 'no intervention' on all-cause mortality (45/699 (6.4%) versus 46/692 (6.6%); RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.42, I² = 0%; 14 trials); on all-cause mortality or liver transplantation (86/713 (12.1%) versus 89/706 (12.6%); RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.25, I² = 15%; 15 trials); on serious adverse events (94/695 (13.5%) versus 107/687 (15.6%); RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.12, I² = 23%; 14 trials); or on non-serious adverse events (27/643 (4.2%) versus 18/634 (2.8%); RR 1.46, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.56, I² = 0%; 12 trials). The random-effects model meta-regression showed that the risk of bias of the trials, disease severity of patients at entry, ursodeoxycholic acid dosage, and trial duration were not significantly associated with the intervention effects on all-cause mortality, or on all-cause mortality or liver transplantation. Ursodeoxycholic acid did not influence the number of patients with pruritus (168/321 (52.3%) versus 166/309 (53.7%); RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.09, I² = 0%; 6 trials) or with fatigue (170/252 (64.9%) versus 174/244 (71.3%); RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.00, I² = 62%; 4 trials). Two trials reported the number of patients with jaundice and showed a significant effect of ursodeoxycholic acid versus placebo or no intervention in a fixed-effect meta-analysis (5/99 (5.1%) versus 15/99 (15.2%); RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.90, I² = 51%; 2 trials). The result was not supported by the random-effects meta-analysis (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.06 to 4.95). Portal pressure, varices, bleeding varices, ascites, and hepatic encephalopathy were not significantly affected by ursodeoxycholic acid. Ursodeoxycholic acid significantly decreased serum bilirubin concentration (MD -8.69 µmol/l, 95% CI -13.90 to -3.48, I² = 0%; 881 patients; 9 trials) and activity of serum alkaline phosphatases (MD -257.09 U/L, 95% CI -306.25 to -207.92, I² = 0%; 754 patients, 9 trials) compared with placebo or no intervention. These results were supported by trial sequential analysis. Ursodeoxycholic acid also seemed to improve serum levels of gamma-glutamyltransferase, aminotransferases, total cholesterol, and plasma immunoglobulin M concentration. Ursodeoxycholic acid seemed to have a beneficial effect on worsening of histological stage (random; 66/281 (23.5%) versus 103/270 (38.2%); RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.88, I² = 35%; 7 trials). This systematic review did not demonstrate any significant benefits of ursodeoxycholic acid on all-cause mortality, all-cause mortality or liver transplantation, pruritus, or fatigue in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid seemed to have a beneficial effect on liver biochemistry measures and on histological progression compared with the control group. All but one of the included trials had high risk of bias, and there are risks of outcome reporting bias and risks of random errors as well. Randomised trials with low risk of bias and low risks of random errors examining the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis are needed.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 12/2012; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ursodeoxycholic acid is administered to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-mediated liver disease with unknown aetiology. Despite its controversial effects, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved its usage for primary biliary cirrhosis. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched for eligible randomised trials in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, Clinicaltrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The literature search was performed until January 2012. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials assessing the beneficial and harmful effects of ursodeoxycholic acid versus placebo or 'no intervention' in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently extracted data. Continuous data were analysed using mean difference (MD) and standardised mean difference (SMD). Dichotomous data were analysed using risk ratio (RR). Meta-analyses were conducted using both a random-effects model and a fixed-effect model, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Random-effects model meta-regression was used to assess the effects of covariates across the trials. Trial sequential analysis was used to assess risk of random errors (play of chance). Risks of bias (systematic error) in the included trials were assessed according to Cochrane methodology bias domains. MAIN RESULTS: Sixteen randomised clinical trials with 1447 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were included. One trial had low risk of bias, and the remaining fifteen had high risk of bias. Fourteen trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with placebo and two trials compared ursodeoxycholic acid with 'no intervention'. The percentage of patients with advanced primary biliary cirrhosis at baseline varied from 15% to 83%, with a median of 51%. The duration of the trials varied from 3 to 92 months, with a median of 24 months. The results showed no significant difference in effect between ursodeoxycholic acid and placebo or 'no intervention' on all-cause mortality (45/699 (6.4%) versus 46/692 (6.6%); RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.42, I² = 0%; 14 trials); on all-cause mortality or liver transplantation (86/713 (12.1%) versus 89/706 (12.6%); RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.25, I² = 15%; 15 trials); on serious adverse events (94/695 (13.5%) versus 107/687 (15.6%); RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.12, I² = 23%; 14 trials); or on non-serious adverse events (27/643 (4.2%) versus 18/634 (2.8%); RR 1.46, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.56, I² = 0%; 12 trials). The random-effects model meta-regression showed that the risk of bias of the trials, disease severity of patients at entry, ursodeoxycholic acid dosage, and trial duration were not significantly associated with the intervention effects on all-cause mortality, or on all-cause mortality or liver transplantation. Ursodeoxycholic acid did not influence the number of patients with pruritus (168/321 (52.3%) versus 166/309 (53.7%); RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.09, I² = 0%; 6 trials) or with fatigue (170/252 (64.9%) versus 174/244 (71.3%); RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.00, I² = 62%; 4 trials). Two trials reported the number of patients with jaundice and showed a significant effect of ursodeoxycholic acid versus placebo or no intervention in a fixed-effect meta-analysis (5/99 (5.1%) versus 15/99 (15.2%); RR 0.35, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.90, I² = 51%; 2 trials). The result was not supported by the random-effects meta-analysis (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.06 to 4.95). Portal pressure, varices, bleeding varices, ascites, and hepatic encephalopathy were not significantly affected by ursodeoxycholic acid. Ursodeoxycholic acid significantly decreased serum bilirubin concentration (MD -8.69 µmol/l, 95% CI -13.90 to -3.48, I² = 0%; 881 patients; 9 trials) and activity of serum alkaline phosphatases (MD -257.09 U/L, 95% CI -306.25 to -207.92, I² = 0%; 754 patients, 9 trials) compared with placebo or no intervention. These results were supported by trial sequential analysis. Ursodeoxycholic acid also seemed to improve serum levels of gamma-glutamyltransferase, aminotransferases, total cholesterol, and plasma immunoglobulin M concentration. Ursodeoxycholic acid seemed to have a beneficial effect on worsening of histological stage (random; 66/281 (23.5%) versus 103/270 (38.2%); RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.88, I² = 35%; 7 trials). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review did not demonstrate any significant benefits of ursodeoxycholic acid on all-cause mortality, all-cause mortality or liver transplantation, pruritus, or fatigue in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Ursodeoxycholic acid seemed to have a beneficial effect on liver biochemistry measures and on histological progression compared with the control group. All but one of the included trials had high risk of bias, and there are risks of outcome reporting bias and risks of random errors as well. Randomised trials with low risk of bias and low risks of random errors examining the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis are needed.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 12/2012; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Arteriovenous fistula of the superior mesenteric blood vessels is a rare complicaton in abdominal surgery. We presented a 49-year-old man with cramp-like abdominal pain, abdominal distension and weight loss symptoms, with a history of previous small bowel resection and right colectomy, due to Crohn disease, 16 years ago. Clinical examination revealed a paraumbilical pulsation with systolic murmur and thrill. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed cystic dilatation of the superior mesenteric vein, hepatomegaly and ascites. Upper endoscopy revealed grade I esophageal varices with portal hypertensive gastropathy. The diagnosis of arteriovenous fistula between superior mesenteric artery and vein was confirmed by angiogram of the superior mesenteric vessels and resection of the fistula was performed. Control examination after nine months showed no signs of portal hypertension. Early diagnosis and treatment of mesenteric blood vessel arteriovenous fistula prevents portal hypertension development and its complications.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 07/2012; 69(7):623-6. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Portal hypertension and development of esophageal varices is one of the major complications of liver cirrhosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of the presence of esophageal varices and their size using biochemical and ultrasonography parameters in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. We included in our study 86 patients (74 males, mean age 55±7) with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The control group consisted of 102 patients with cirrhosis of other etiologies. All patients underwent a complete biochemical workup, upper digestive endoscopy and ultrasonography examination. The right liver lobe diameter/albumin and platelet count/spleen diameter ratios were calculated. The correlation of the calculated ratios with the presence and degree of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis was also determined. The mean value of right liver lobe diameter-albumin ratio was 6.15±1.77, and statistically significantly differed from values determined in the control group (4.97±1.68). The mean platelet count-spleen diameter ratio was 972.5±599.0 in alcoholic liver cirrhosis and 1055.9±821.3 in controls (p>0.05). In patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, none of the analyzed noninvasive markers was shown to be a good predictor of the presence and size of esophageal varices. Despite the important role of noninvasive markers in providing information pertinent to determination of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis, these markers have limited relevance in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis.
    The Turkish journal of gastroenterology: the official journal of Turkish Society of Gastroenterology 06/2012; 23(3):239-46. · 0.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whipple's disease is a chronic, multisystem, infectious disease caused by Tropheryma whipplei. It most commonly affects Caucasian males, middle-aged. Morbus Whipple is primarily gastrointestinal disease, manifested as malabsorption syndrome, and diagnosed by endoscopy and intestinal biopsy. Extraintestinal manifestations are not rare. A 48-year-old male was admitted due to diarrhea, weight loss and weakness in the extremities. Physical examination findings pointed out diffuse hyperpigmentation, pleural effusion and leg edema. Anemia, inflammatory syndrome and malabsorption signs were discovered through laboratory tests. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was treated with antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. After 9 months, the patient had no symptoms, and clinical and laboratory findings were regular. Whipple's disease is a rare disease. A high degree of clinical suspicion for the disease (malabsorption, arthritis, fever, neurological symptoms) is the most important for diagnosis. Timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy prevent the disease progression and fatal outcome.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 06/2012; 69(6):522-5. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis is complicated. There are studies suggesting that bezafibrate, alone or in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is effective in the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis, but no systematic review has summarised the evidence yet. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of bezafibrate in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, Clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and full text searches were conducted until November 2011. The searches in Chinese Bio-medical Literature Database, China Network Knowledge Information, Chinese Science Journal Database, Chinese Medical Citation Index, Wanfang Database, and full text searches were conducted until January 2011. Manufacturers and authors were contacted. All randomised clinical trials comparing bezafibrate at any dose or regimen in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis with placebo or no intervention, or with another drug. Any concomitant interventions were allowed if received equally by all treatment groups in a trial. Two authors extracted data. RevMan Analysis was used for statistical analysis of dichotomous data with risk ratio (RR) or risk difference (RD), and of continuous data with mean difference (MD), both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Methodological domains were used to assess risk of systematic errors (bias). Trial sequential analysis was used to control for random errors (play of chance). Six trials with 151 Japanese patients were included. All trials had high risk of bias. Four trials compared bezafibrate plus UDCA with no intervention plus UDCA (referenced as bezafibrate versus no intervention in the remaining text), and two trials compared bezafibrate with UDCA. No patient died and no patient developed liver-related complications in any of the included trials. Bezafibrate was without significant effects on the occurrence of adverse events compared with no intervention (5/32 (16%) versus 0/28 (0%)) (RR 5.40, 95% CI 0.69 to 42.32; 3 trials with 60 patients; I² = 0%) or with UDCA (2/32 (6%) versus 0/37 (0%)) (RR 6.19, 95% CI 0.31 to 122.05; 2 trials with 69 patients; I² = 0%). Bezafibrate significantly decreased the activity of serum alkaline phosphatases compared with no intervention (MD -186.04 U/L, 95% CI -249.03 to -123.04; 4 trials with 79 patients; I² = 34%) and when compared with UDCA (MD -162.90 U/L, 95% CI -199.68 to -126.12; 2 trials with 48 patients; I² = 0%). These results were supported by trial sequential analyses. Bezafibrate compared with no intervention significantly decreased plasma immunoglobulin M (MD -164.00 mg/dl, 95% CI -259.47 to -68.53; 3 trials with 50 patients; I² = 46%) and serum bilirubin concentration (MD -0.19 mg/dl, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.00; 2 trials with 34 patients; I² = 0%). However, the latter two results were not supported by trial sequential analyses. Bezafibrate compared with no intervention had no significant effect on the activity of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (MD -1.22 U/L, 95% CI -11.97 to 9.52; 4 trials with 79 patients; I² = 42%) and serum alanine aminotransferase (MD -5.61 U/L, 95% CI -24.50 to 13.27; 2 trials with 35 patients; I² = 34%). Bezafibrate compared with UDCA had no significant effect on the activity of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (MD 38.44 U/L, 95% CI -180.67 to 257.55; 2 trials with 49 patients; I² = 89%), serum alanine aminotransferase (MD -2.34 U/L, 95% CI -34.73 to 30.06; 2 trials with 49 patients; I² = 95%), and plasma immunoglobulin M concentration (MD -20.23 mg/dl, 95% CI -218.71 to 178.25; 2 trials with 41 patients; I² = 90%) in random-effects model meta-analyses, but bezafibrate significantly decreased the activity of serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (MD -58.18, 95% CI -76.49 to -39.88; 2 trials with 49 patients; I² = 89%), serum alanine aminotransferase (MD -13.94, 95% CI -18.78 to -9.09; 2 trials with 49 patients; I² = 95%), and plasma immunoglobulin M concentration (MD -99.90, 95% CI -130.72 to -69.07; 2 trials with 41 patients; I² = 90%) in fixed-effect model meta-analyses. One patient had bezafibrate withdrawn due to an adverse event compared to no intervention (RD 0.03, 95% CI -0.09 to 0.16; 2 trials with 60 patients; I² = 0%). This systematic review did not demonstrate any effect of bezafibrate versus no intervention on mortality, liver-related morbidity, adverse events, and pruritus in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Furthermore, we found no significant effects of bezafibrate on mortality, liver-related morbidity, or adverse events when compared with ursodeoxycholic acid, None of the trials assessed quality of life or fatigue. The data seem to indicate a possible positive intervention effect of bezafibrate on some liver biochemistry measures compared with the control group, but the observed effects could be due to systematic errors or random errors. We need more randomised clinical trials on the effects of bezafibrate on primary biliary cirrhosis with low risks of systematic errors and random errors.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 1:CD009145. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The term autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used in Japan in 1995 to describe a newly recognized form of chronic pancreatitis, after the description of Yoshida and colleagues. But Sarles in 1961, first described a form of idiopathic chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas, suspected to be due to an autoimmune process. AIP has become a widely accepted term because clinical, serologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings suggest an autoimmune mechanism. Most affected patients have hypergammaglobulinemia and increased serum levels of IgG, particularly IgG4. Recently published International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Pancreatitis include Guidelines of the International Association of Pancreatology, classifying AIP into types 1 and 2, using five cardinal features of AIP, namely imaging of pancreatic parenchyma and duct, serology, other organ involvement, pancreatic histology, and an optional criterion of response to steroid therapy. Extrapancreatic presentations can include sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner tumor), lymphadenopathy, nephritis, and interstitial pneumonia. Increased IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate has been reported in sclerosing lesions from other organ sites, including inflammatory pseudotumors of the liver, breast, mediastinum, orbit, and aorta, and it has been observed with hypophysitis and IgG4-associated prostatitis. Abundant IgG4+ plasma cells were also confirmed in Riedel thyroiditis, sclerosing mesenteritis, and inflammatory pseudotumor of the orbit and stomach. Extrapancreatic lesions could be synchronously or metachronously diagnosed with AIP, sharing the same pathological conditions, showing also a favorable result to corticosteroid therapy and distinct differentiation between IgG4-related diseases from the inherent lesions of the corresponding organs.
    Digestive Diseases 01/2012; 30(2):220-3. · 2.73 Impact Factor
  • Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 01/2012; 18:CD009145.
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    ABSTRACT: Bisphosphonates are widely used for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis often have osteoporosis - either postmenopausal or secondary to the liver disease. No systematic review or meta-analysis has assessed the effects of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis in primary biliary cirrhosis. The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and full text searches were conducted until November 2011. Manufacturers and authors were contacted for additional studies during the conductance of the review. All randomised clinical trials of bisphosphonates in primary biliary cirrhosis compared with placebo or no intervention, or another bisphosphonate, or any other drug. Two authors extracted data. RevMan Analysis was used for statistical analysis of dichotomous data with risk ratio (RR) or risk difference (RD) and of continuous data with mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD), all with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Methodological components were used to assess risk of systematic errors (bias). Trial sequential analysis was also used to control for random errors (play of chance). Six trials were included. Three trials with 106 participants, of which two trials with high risk of bias, did not demonstrate significant effects of bisphosphonates (etidronate or alendronate) versus placebo or no intervention regarding mortality (RD 0.00; 95% CI -0.12 to 0.12, I² = 0%), fractures (RR 0.87; 95% CI 0.29 to 2.66, I² = 0%), or adverse events (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.49 to 2.04). Two trials with 62 participants with high risk of bias compared one bisphosphonate (etidronate or alendronate) versus another (alendronate or ibandronate) and found no significant difference regarding mortality (RD -0.03; 95% CI -0.14 to 0.07, I² = 0%), fractures (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.18 to 5.06, I² = 0%), or adverse events (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.49 to 2.04, I² = 0%). Bisphosphonates had no significant effect on liver-related mortality, liver transplantation, or liver-related morbidity compared with placebo or no intervention, or another bisphosphonate. Bisphosphonates had no significant effect on bone mineral density compared with placebo or no intervention, or another bisphosphonate. Bisphosphonates compared with placebo or no intervention seem to decrease the urinary amino telopeptides of collagen I (NTx) concentration (MD -16.93 nmol bone collagen equivalents/mmol creatinine; 95% CI -23.77 to -10.10; 2 trials with 88 patients; I² = 0%) and serum osteocalcin (SMD -0.81; 95% CI -1.22 to -0.39; 3 trials with 100 patients; I² = 34 %) concentration. The former result was supported by trial sequential analysis, but not the latter. Alendronate compared with another bisphosphonate (ibandronate) had no significant effect on serum osteocalcin concentration (MD -3.61 ng/ml, 95% CI -9.41 to 2.18; 2 trials with 47 patients; I² = 82%) in a random-effects meta-analysis, but it significantly decreased serum osteocalcin (MD -4.40 ng/ml, 95% CI -6.75 to -2.05; 2 trials with 47 patients; I² = 82%), the procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (MD -8.79 ng/ml, 95% CI -15.96 to -1.63; 2 trials with 47 patients; I² = 38%), and NTx concentration (MD -14.07 nmol bone collagen equivalents/mmol creatinine, 95% CI -24.23 to -3.90; 2 trials with 46 patients; I²=0%) in a fixed-effect model. The latter two results were not supported by trial sequential analyses. There was no statistically significant difference in the number of patients having bisphosphonates withdrawn due to adverse events compared with placebo or no intervention (RD -0.04; 95% CI -0.21 to 0.12; 2 trials with 46 patients; I² = 0%), or another bisphosphonate (RR 0.56; 95% CI 0.14 to 2.17; 2 trials with 62 patients; I² = 0%). One trial with 32 participants and with high risk of bias compared etidronate versus sodium fluoride without finding significant difference regarding mortality, fractures, adverse events, or bone mineral density. Etidronate compared with sodium fluoride significantly decreased serum osteocalcin, urinary hydroxyproline, and parathyroid hormone concentration. We did not find evidence to support or refute the use of bisphosphonates for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. The data seem to indicate a possible positive intervention effect of bisphosphonates on decreasing urinary amino telopeptides of collagen I concentration compared with placebo or no intervention with no risk of random error. There is need for more randomised clinical trials assessing the effects of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis on patient-relevant outcomes in primary biliary cirrhosis.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 12/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Women with primary biliary cirrhosis often suffer from postmenopausal osteoporosis due to their age, or osteoporosis secondary to their liver disease, or treatments provided for their liver disease. Hormone replacement increases bone mineral density and reduces fractures in postmenopausal women. On the other hand, hormone replacement increases the risk of various adverse events. We could not identify any meta-analyses or systematic reviews on hormone replacement in women with primary biliary cirrhosis. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of hormone replacement for osteoporosis in women with primary biliary cirrhosis. The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS, clinicaltrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and full text searches were conducted until November 2011. Manufacturers and authors were contacted during the review conductance. All randomised clinical trials of hormone replacement in primary biliary cirrhosis administered by any route, or regimen, or dose compared with placebo or no intervention. Two authors extracted data. RevMan Analysis was used for statistical analysis of dichotomous data with risk ratio (RR) or risk difference (RD) and of continuous data with mean difference (MD), all with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Methodological domains were used to assess risk of systematic errors (bias). Trial sequential analysis was used to control for random errors (play of chance). Two trials with 49 participants were included. One trial had low risk of bias. The other trial had high risk of bias. Hormone replacement had no effect on all-cause mortality (RD 0.00; 95% CI -0.11 to 0.11, I² = 0%) and fractures (RD -0.08; 95% CI -0.24 to 0.07, I² = 0%). Hormone replacement significantly increased adverse events and number of patients having hormone replacement withdrawn due to adverse events (RR 5.26; 95% CI 1.26 to 22.04, I² = 0%). Hormone replacement had no significant effect on lumbar spine bone mineral density (MD 1.25 g/cm² yearֿ¹; 95% CI -0.91 to 3.42, I² = 0%). On the other hand, a significant increase in proximal femur bone mineral density was observed in the control group (MD 2.24 g/cm² yearֿ¹; 95% CI 0.74 to 3.74, I² = 0%). Hormone replacement had no significant effect on liver-related mortality, liver transplantation, or liver-related morbidity. Hormone replacement had no significant effect on serum bilirubin concentration (MD 4.60 µmol/L; 95% CI -3.42 to 12.62, I² = 0%). We did not find evidence to support the use of hormone replacement for women with primary biliary cirrhosis. It seems that hormone replacement is connected with a significant increase in the occurrence of adverse events.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 12/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a progressive, chronic liver disease with elevated serum lipids, but it is unclear whether hyperlipidemia in PBC patients is associated with atherosclerosis. Metabolic syndrome promotes development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease related to abdominal type obesity and insulin resistance. The aim of our study was to assess abdominal adiposity in patients with PBC. The study included 40 patients with PBC and 50 healthy controls. Age, sex and anthropometric measurements (weight, height, body mass index and waist circumference) were registered for all patients and controls. We used ultrasonography to measure subcutaneous (SF) and visceral fat (VF) diameter, subcutaneous area (SA) and visceral area (VA), as well as perirenal fat diameter (PF). Values of SF, VF and PF thicknesses in PBC patients were 19.23 +/- 5.85 mm, 10.92 +/- 3.63 mm, and 7.03 +/- 1.82 mm, respectively. In controls these measurements were 22.73 +/- 6.70 mm, 16.84 +/-5.51 mm and 10.50 +/- 2.70 mm respectively. In PBC patients SA and VA were calculated to 983.64 +/- 322.68 mm2 and 403.64 +/- 166.97 mm2 and in controls 1124.89 +/- 366.01 mm2 and 720.57 +/- 272.50 mm2 respectively. Significant difference was found for VF, VA and RF values. Considering that the amount of visceral fat plays an important role in development of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, we concluded that the lower amount of visceral fat in PBC patients could be related to lower incidence of cardiovascular events, despite hyperlipidemia.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 09/2011; 68(9):739-43. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 03/2011; 68(3):270-3. · 0.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There are four major complications of peptic ulcer disease (PUD): bleeding, perforation, penetration, and obstruction. Complications can occur in patients with peptic ulcer of any etiology. Despite improvements in the medical management and the lower overall incidence of PUD, there are conflicting data about the incidence of potentially life-threatening ulcer complications. There are important time trends embedded within this stable overall rate of complications: the dramatic decline in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (comparing the cohort born from 1900 to 1920 to cohorts born after 1940); an increased use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and an increased rate of ulcer complications related to such drug use, especially in the elderly. As a result of these trends, ulcer complications are on the rise in older patients but on the decline in younger individuals. Hemorrhage is the most frequent PUD complication and its incidence is increasing in comparison to perforation and stenosis. Therapeutic endoscopy is considered the treatment of choice for bleeding ulcers, reducing the need for emergent surgical procedures to 10-20% of the cases. In recent years, besides the success of angiographic embolization, the containment of massive hemorrhage must also be taken into account. Transcatheter arterial embolization is also an effective and safe treatment in patients with duodenal ulcers re-bleeding after therapeutic endoscopy or surgery.
    Digestive Diseases 01/2011; 29(5):491-3. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: to determine the effect of free serotonin concentrations in plasma on development of esophageal and gastric fundal varices. this prospective study included 33 patients with liver cirrhosis and 24 healthy controls. Ultrasonography and measurement of serotonin concentration in plasma were carried out in both groups of subjects. The upper fiber panendoscopy was performed only in patients with liver cirrhosis. the mean plasma free serotonin levels were much higher in liver cirrhosis patients than in healthy controls (219.0 ± 24.2 nmol/L vs 65.4 ± 18.7 nmol/L, P < 0.0001). There was no significant correlation between serotonin concentration in plasma and the size of the esophageal varices according to Spearman coefficient of correlation (r(s) = -0.217, P > 0.05). However, the correlation of plasma serotonin concentration and gastric fundal varices was highly significant (r(s) = -0.601, P < 0.01). free serotonin is significant in pathogenesis of portal hypertension especially in development of fundal varices, indicating the clinical value of serotonergic receptor blockers in these patients.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 12/2010; 16(48):6135-8. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to determine differences in gastroduodenal damage related to the presence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in patients starting long-term NSAID therapy. Seventy-one candidates for chronic NSAIDs therapy (33 Hp negative and 38 Hp positive) entered the study and underwent upper GI endoscopy before, and 8 and 16 weeks after, continuous NSAID therapy. Lanza score increased in both Hp positive and negative patients in the course of NSAID therapy (P < 0.001), being significantly higher in Hp positive than Hp negative (4.31 ± 1.33 vs 3.15 ± 1.95, P < 0.05) after 16 weeks of follow-up. In gastric mucosa, no significant difference in mean Lanza score was observed between the two groups. Duodenal ulcer was diagnosed in 18 (36.8%) Hp positive and 1 (3%) Hp negative patient (P < 0.05). Hp is more closely related to duodenal than gastric mucosal injury in NSAID users. Risk for duodenal ulcer in Hp-infected individual increases after 4 months of NSAID therapy.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 10/2010; 55(10):2887-92. · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Malnutrition is a common feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are numerous methods for the assessment of nutritional status, but the gold standard has not yet been established. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of undernutrition and to evaluate methods for routine nutritional assessment of active IBD patients. Twenty-three patients with active Crohn disease, 53 patients with active ulcerative colitis and 30 controls were included in the study. The nutritional status was assessed by extensive anthropometric measurements, percentage of weight loss in the past 1-6 months and biochemical markers of nutrition. All investigated nutritional parameters were significantly different in IBD patients compared to control subjects, except MCV, tryglicerides and serum total protein level. Serum albumin level and body mass index (BMI) were the most predictive parameters of malnutrition. According to different assessment methods the prevalence of undernutrition and severe undernutrition in patients with active IBD were 25.0%-69.7% and 1.3%-31.6%, respectively, while in the control subjects no abnormalities have been detected. There was no statistically significant difference of nutritional parameters between UC and CD patients except lower mid-arm muscle circumference in UC group. Malnutrition is common in IBD patients. BMI and serum albumin are simple and convenient methods for the assessment of the nutritional status in IBD patients. Further studies with larger group of patients are necessary to elucidate the prevalence of malnutrition and the most accurate assessment methods in IBD patients.
    European Journal of Internal Medicine 08/2010; 21(4):315-9. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine tumors cover a spectrum of neoplasms showing wide variations in their clinicopathological and pathogenetic features, as well as prognosis. They may develop throughout the whole gastrointestinal tract. We described a case of gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma in a 29-year-old male. The patient presented with chronic continuous abdominal pain and weight loss over a 6-month period. Preoperative diagnosis, operative findings, histology and immunohistochemistry of the tumor confirmed the diagnosis of the rare neuroendocrine gastric carcinoma, stage T2N1. Case reports of this rare tumor are important, because of the paucity of studies noted in the gastrointestinal literature as a result of poor identification prior to the advent of modern immunohistochemistry. Significance of accurately diagnosing gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors is crucial for an appropriate treatment.
    Vojnosanitetski pregled. Military-medical and pharmaceutical review 04/2010; 67(4):332-5. · 0.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

130 Citations
72.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2012
    • University of Belgrade
      • School of Medicine
      Belgrade, SE, Serbia
  • 2004–2012
    • Klinički centar Srbije
      • • Clinical Center of Serbia
      • • Institute of Digestive Diseases
      Beograd, Central Serbia, Serbia
  • 2010
    • Klinicki Centar Kragujevac
      Krabujevac, Central Serbia, Serbia