Jun-ichi Takeda

National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka-ken, Japan

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Publications (17)112.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://hinv.jp/ ) is an integrated database of all human genes and transcripts that started in an international collaborative research project for establishing a functional annotation database of human full-length cDNAs. Because H-InvDB contains an abundance of information for human transcripts, including not only well-characterized protein-coding transcripts but also those without experimental evidence at the protein level, this will be a useful information resource for identifying novel and uncharacterized human proteins (so-called missing proteins). By extending predicted protein data in H-InvDB, we developed the H-Inv Extended Protein Database (H-EPD; http://hinv.jp/hinv/h-epd/ ). From now on, we plan to carry out a database-driven proteome research that makes full use of H-EPD to promote discoveries in the current and future C-HPP. Furthermore, we will push forward with the integration of genome, transcriptome, and proteome databases using a unique tool for connecting distributed databases and would like to develop a knowledge discovery system by incorporating data mining tools.
    Journal of Proteome Research 12/2012; · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: H-InvDB (http://www.h-invitational.jp/) is a comprehensive human gene database started in 2004. In the latest version, H-InvDB 8.0, a total of 244 709 human complementary DNA was mapped onto the hg19 reference genome and 43 829 gene loci, including nonprotein-coding ones, were identified. Of these loci, 35 631 were identified as potential protein-coding genes, and 22 898 of these were identical to known genes. In our analysis, 19 309 annotated genes were specific to H-InvDB and not found in RefSeq and Ensembl. In fact, 233 genes of the 19 309 turned out to have protein functions in this version of H-InvDB; they were annotated as unknown protein functions in the previous version. Furthermore, 11 genes were identified as known Mendelian disorder genes. It is advantageous that many biologically functional genes are hidden in the H-InvDB unique genes. As large-scale proteomic projects have been conducted to elucidate the functions of all human proteins, we have enhanced the proteomic information with an advanced protein view and new subdatabase of protein complexes (Protein Complex Database with quality index). We propose that H-InvDB is an important resource for finding novel candidate targets for medical care and drug development.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/2012; · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alternative splicing (AS) is a key molecular process that endows biological functions with diversity and complexity. Generally, functional redundancy leads to the generation of new functions through relaxation of selective pressure in evolution, as exemplified by duplicated genes. It is also known that alternatively spliced exons (ASEs) are subject to relaxed selective pressure. Within consensus sequences at the splice junctions, the most conserved sites are dinucleotides at both ends of introns (splice dinucleotides). However, a small number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur at splice dinucleotides. An intriguing question relating to the evolution of AS diversity is whether mutations at splice dinucleotides are maintained as polymorphisms and produce diversity in splice patterns within the human population. We therefore surveyed validated SNPs in the database dbSNP located at splice dinucleotides of all human genes that are defined by the H-Invitational Database. We found 212 validated SNPs at splice dinucleotides (sdSNPs); these were confirmed to be consistent with the GT-AG rule at either allele. Moreover, 53 of them were observed to neighbor ASEs (AE dinucleotides). No significant differences were observed between sdSNPs at AE dinucleotides and those at constitutive exons (CE dinucleotides) in SNP properties including average heterozygosity, SNP density, ratio of predicted alleles consistent with the GT-AG rule, and scores of splice sites formed with the predicted allele. We also found that the proportion of non-conserved exons was higher for exons with sdSNPs than for other exons. sdSNPs are found at CE dinucleotides in addition to those at AE dinucleotides, suggesting two possibilities. First, sdSNPs at CE dinucleotides may be robust against sdSNPs because of unknown mechanisms. Second, similar to sdSNPs at AE dinucleotides, those at CE dinucleotides cause differences in AS patterns because of the arbitrariness in the classification of exons into alternative and constitutive type that varies according to the dataset. Taking into account the absence of differences in sdSNP properties between those at AE and CE dinucleotides, the increased proportion of non-conserved exons found in exons flanked by sdSNPs suggests the hypothesis that sdSNPs are maintained at the splice dinucleotides of newly generated exons at which negative selection pressure is relaxed.
    BMC Evolutionary Biology 01/2010; 10:122. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: H-DBAS (http://h-invitational.jp/h-dbas/) is a specialized database for human alternative splicing (AS) based on H-Invitational full-length cDNAs. In this update, for better annotations of AS events, we correlated RNA-Seq tag information to the AS exons and splice junctions. We generated a total of 148,376,598 RNA-Seq tags from RNAs extracted from cytoplasmic, nuclear and polysome fractions. Analysis of the RNA-Seq tags allowed us to identify 90,900 exons that are very likely to be used for protein synthesis. On the other hand, 254 AS junctions of human RefSeq transcripts are unique to nuclear RNA and may not have any translational consequences. We also present a new comparative genomics viewer so that users can empirically understand the evolutionary turnover of AS. With the unique experimental data closely connected with intensively curated cDNA information, H-DBAS provides a unique platform for the analysis of complex AS.
    Nucleic Acids Research 12/2009; 38(Database issue):D86-90. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the extended database and data mining resources newly released in the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). H-InvDB is a comprehensive annotation resource of human genes and transcripts, and consists of two main views and six sub-databases. The latest release of H-InvDB (release 6.2) provides the annotation for 219,765 human transcripts in 43,159 human gene clusters based on human full-length cDNAs and mRNAs. H-InvDB now provides several new annotation features, such as mapping of microarray probes, new gene models, relation to known ncRNAs and information from the Glycogene database. H-InvDB also provides useful data mining resources-'Navigation search', 'H-InvDB Enrichment Analysis Tool (HEAT)' and web service APIs. 'Navigation search' is an extended search system that enables complicated searches by combining 16 different search options. HEAT is a data mining tool for automatically identifying features specific to a given human gene set. HEAT searches for H-InvDB annotations that are significantly enriched in a user-defined gene set, as compared with the entire H-InvDB representative transcripts. H-InvDB now has web service APIs of SOAP and REST to allow the use of H-InvDB data in programs, providing the users extended data accessibility.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/2009; 38(Database issue):D626-32. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; "http://www.h-invitational.jp/":http://www.h-invitational.jp/) is an integrated database of human genes and transcripts. By extensive analyses of all human transcripts, we provide curated annotations of human genes and transcripts that include gene structures, alternative splicing isoforms, non-coding functional RNAs, protein functions, functional domains, sub-cellular localizations, metabolic pathways, protein 3D structure, genetic polymorphisms, relation with diseases, gene expression profiling, molecular evolutionary features, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and gene families/groups. The latest release of H-InvDB (release 6.0) provide annotation for 219,765 human transcripts in 43,159 human gene clusters based on human FLcDNAs and mRNAs. H-InvDB consists of two main views, the Transcript view and the Locus view, and six auxiliary databases with web-based viewers; G-integra, H-ANGEL, DiseaseInfo Viewer, Evola, PPI view and Gene Family/Group view. We also provides several data mining tools such as “Navi search”: consists of 16 search contents each of which includes items for the search condition ("http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/c-search/hinvNaviTop.jsp":http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/c-search/hinvNaviTop.jsp), “PANDA”: Priority ANalysis for Disease Association (PANDA) system ("http://www.h-invitational.jp/panda/app":http://www.h-invitational.jp/panda/app), H-InvDB now provides web service APIs of SOAP and REST to use H-InvDB data in programs. ("http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/hws/doc/":http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/hws/doc/)
    Nature Precedings. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Using full-length cDNA sequences, we compared alternative splicing (AS) in humans and mice. The alignment of the human and mouse genomes showed that 86% of 199 426 total exons in human AS variants were conserved in the mouse genome. Of the 20 392 total human AS variants, however, 59% consisted of all conserved exons. Comparing AS patterns between human and mouse transcripts revealed that only 431 transcripts from 189 loci were perfectly conserved AS variants. To exclude the possibility that the full-length human cDNAs used in the present study, especially those with retained introns, were cloning artefacts or prematurely spliced transcripts, we experimentally validated 34 such cases. Our results indicate that even retained-intron type transcripts are typically expressed in a highly controlled manner and interact with translating ribosomes. We found non-conserved AS exons to be predominantly outside the coding sequences (CDSs). This suggests that non-conserved exons in the CDSs of transcripts cause functional constraint. These findings should enhance our understanding of the relationship between AS and species specificity of human genes.
    Nucleic Acids Research 11/2008; 36(20):6386-95. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB) was created to provide the genome sequence assembly of the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP), manually curated annotation of the sequence, and other genomics information that could be useful for comprehensive understanding of the rice biology. Since the last publication of the RAP-DB, the IRGSP genome has been revised and reassembled. In addition, a large number of rice-expressed sequence tags have been released, and functional genomics resources have been produced worldwide. Thus, we have thoroughly updated our genome annotation by manual curation of all the functional descriptions of rice genes. The latest version of the RAP-DB contains a variety of annotation data as follows: clone positions, structures and functions of 31 439 genes validated by cDNAs, RNA genes detected by massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) technology and sequence similarity, flanking sequences of mutant lines, transposable elements, etc. Other annotation data such as Gnomon can be displayed along with those of RAP for comparison. We have also developed a new keyword search system to allow the user to access useful information. The RAP-DB is available at: http://rapdb.dna.affrc.go.jp/ and http://rapdb.lab.nig.ac.jp/.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2008; 36(Database issue):D1028-33. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Orthologs are genes in different species that evolved from a common ancestral gene by speciation. Currently, with the rapid growth of transcriptome data of various species, more reliable orthology information is prerequisite for further studies. However, detection of orthologs could be erroneous if pairwise distance-based methods, such as reciprocal BLAST searches, are utilized. Thus, as a sub-database of H-InvDB, an integrated database of annotated human genes (http://h-invitational.jp/), we constructed a fully curated database of evolutionary features of human genes, called 'Evola'. In the process of the ortholog detection, computational analysis based on conserved genome synteny and transcript sequence similarity was followed by manual curation by researchers examining phylogenetic trees. In total, 18 968 human genes have orthologs among 11 vertebrates (chimpanzee, mouse, cow, chicken, zebrafish, etc.), either computationally detected or manually curated orthologs. Evola provides amino acid sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees of orthologs and homologs. In 'd(N)/d(S) view', natural selection on genes can be analyzed between human and other species. In 'Locus maps', all transcript variants and their exon/intron structures can be compared among orthologous gene loci. We expect the Evola to serve as a comprehensive and reliable database to be utilized in comparative analyses for obtaining new knowledge about human genes. Evola is available at http://www.h-invitational.jp/evola/.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2008; 36(Database issue):D787-92. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here we report the new features and improvements in our latest release of the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/), a comprehensive annotation resource for human genes and transcripts. H-InvDB, originally developed as an integrated database of the human transcriptome based on extensive annotation of large sets of full-length cDNA (FLcDNA) clones, now provides annotation for 120 558 human mRNAs extracted from the International Nucleotide Sequence Databases (INSD), in addition to 54 978 human FLcDNAs, in the latest release H-InvDB_4.6. We mapped those human transcripts onto the human genome sequences (NCBI build 36.1) and determined 34 699 human gene clusters, which could define 34 057 (98.1%) protein-coding and 642 (1.9%) non-protein-coding loci; 858 (2.5%) transcribed loci overlapped with predicted pseudogenes. For all these transcripts and genes, we provide comprehensive annotation including gene structures, gene functions, alternative splicing variants, functional non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, predicted sub cellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein 3D structure, mapping of SNPs and microsatellite repeat motifs, co-localization with orphan diseases, gene expression profiles, orthologous genes, protein-protein interactions (PPI) and annotation for gene families. The current H-InvDB annotation resources consist of two main views: Transcript view and Locus view and eight sub-databases: the DiseaseInfo Viewer, H-ANGEL, the Clustering Viewer, G-integra, the TOPO Viewer, Evola, the PPI view and the Gene family/group.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2008; 36(Database issue):D793-9. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present here the annotation of the complete genome of rice Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cultivar Nipponbare. All functional annotations for proteins and non-protein-coding RNA (npRNA) candidates were manually curated. Functions were identified or inferred in 19,969 (70%) of the proteins, and 131 possible npRNAs (including 58 antisense transcripts) were found. Almost 5000 annotated protein-coding genes were found to be disrupted in insertional mutant lines, which will accelerate future experimental validation of the annotations. The rice loci were determined by using cDNA sequences obtained from rice and other representative cereals. Our conservative estimate based on these loci and an extrapolation suggested that the gene number of rice is approximately 32,000, which is smaller than previous estimates. We conducted comparative analyses between rice and Arabidopsis thaliana and found that both genomes possessed several lineage-specific genes, which might account for the observed differences between these species, while they had similar sets of predicted functional domains among the protein sequences. A system to control translational efficiency seems to be conserved across large evolutionary distances. Moreover, the evolutionary process of protein-coding genes was examined. Our results suggest that natural selection may have played a role for duplicated genes in both species, so that duplication was suppressed or favored in a manner that depended on the function of a gene.
    Genome Research 03/2007; 17(2):175-83. · 14.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Human-transcriptome DataBase for Alternative Splicing (H-DBAS) is a specialized database of alternatively spliced human transcripts. In this database, each of the alternative splicing (AS) variants corresponds to a completely sequenced and carefully annotated human full-length cDNA, one of those collected for the H-Invitational human-transcriptome annotation meeting. H-DBAS contains 38,664 representative alternative splicing variants (RASVs) in 11,744 loci, in total. The data is retrievable by various features of AS, which were annotated according to manual annotations, such as by patterns of ASs, consequently invoked alternations in the encoded amino acids and affected protein motifs, GO terms, predicted subcellular localization signals and transmembrane domains. The database also records recently identified very complex patterns of AS, in which two distinct genes seemed to be bridged, nested or degenerated (multiple CDS): in all three cases, completely unrelated proteins are encoded by a single locus. By using AS Viewer, each AS event can be analyzed in the context of full-length cDNAs, enabling the user's empirical understanding of the relation between AS event and the consequent alternations in the encoded amino acid sequences together with various kinds of affected protein motifs. H-DBAS is accessible at http://jbirc.jbic.or.jp/h-dbas/.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2007; 35(Database issue):D104-9. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first genome-wide identification and characterization of alternative splicing in human gene transcripts based on analysis of the full-length cDNAs. Applying both manual and computational analyses for 56,419 completely sequenced and precisely annotated full-length cDNAs selected for the H-Invitational human transcriptome annotation meetings, we identified 6877 alternative splicing genes with 18 297 different alternative splicing variants. A total of 37,670 exons were involved in these alternative splicing events. The encoded protein sequences were affected in 6005 of the 6877 genes. Notably, alternative splicing affected protein motifs in 3015 genes, subcellular localizations in 2982 genes and transmembrane domains in 1348 genes. We also identified interesting patterns of alternative splicing, in which two distinct genes seemed to be bridged, nested or having overlapping protein coding sequences (CDSs) of different reading frames (multiple CDS). In these cases, completely unrelated proteins are encoded by a single locus. Genome-wide annotations of alternative splicing, relying on full-length cDNAs, should lay firm groundwork for exploring in detail the diversification of protein function, which is mediated by the fast expanding universe of alternative splicing variants.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2006; 34(14):3917-28. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; ) is a human transcriptome database, containing integrative annotation of 41,118 full-length cDNA clones originated from 21,037 loci. H-InvDB is a product of the H-Invitational project, an international collaboration to systematically and functionally validate human genes by analysis of a unique set of high quality full-length cDNA clones using automatic annotation and human curation under unified criteria. Here, 19,574 proteins encoded by these cDNAs were classified into 11,709 function-known and 7865 function-unknown hypothetical proteins by similarity with protein databases and motif prediction (InterProScan). The proportion of "hypothetical proteins" in H-InvDB was as high as 40.4%. In this study, we thus conducted data-mining in H-InvDB with the aim of assigning advanced functional annotations to those hypothetical proteins. First, by data-mining in the H-InvDB version of GTOP, we identified 337 SCOP domains within 7865 H-Inv hypothetical proteins. Second, by data-mining of predicted subcellular localization by SOSUI and TMHMM in H-InvDB, we found 1032 transmembrane proteins within H-Inv hypothetical proteins. These results clearly demonstrate that structural prediction is effective for functional annotation of proteins with unknown functions. All the data in H-InvDB are shown in two main views, the cDNA view and the Locus view, and five auxiliary databases with web-based viewers; DiseaseInfo Viewer, H-ANGEL, Clustering Viewer, G-integra and TOPO Viewer; the data also are provided as flat files and XML files. The data consists of descriptions of their gene structures, novel alternative splicing isoforms, functional RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein 3D structure, mapping of SNPs and microsatellite repeat motifs in relation with orphan diseases, gene expression profiling, and comparisons with mouse full-length cDNAs in the context of molecular evolution. This unique integrative platform for conducting in silico data-mining represents a substantial contribution to resources required for the exploration of human biology and pathology.
    Gene 01/2006; 364:99-107. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In addition, among 72,027 uniquely mapped SNPs and insertions/deletions localized within human genes, 13,215 nonsynonymous SNPs, 315 nonsense SNPs, and 452 indels occurred in coding regions. Together with 25 polymorphic microsatellite repeats present in coding regions, they may alter protein structure, causing phenotypic effects or resulting in disease. The H-InvDB platform represents a substantial contribution to resources needed for the exploration of human biology and pathology.
    PLoS Biology 07/2004; 2(6):e162. · 12.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/ ). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In addition, among 72,027 uniquely mapped SNPs and insertions/deletions localized within human genes, 13,215 nonsynonymous SNPs, 315 nonsense SNPs, and 452 indels occurred in coding regions. Together with 25 polymorphic microsatellite repeats present in coding regions, they may alter protein structure, causing phenotypic effects or resulting in disease. The H-InvDB platform represents a substantial contribution to resources needed for the exploration of human biology and pathology.
    PLoS Biology. 01/2004;
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    ABSTRACT: H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB: "http://www.h-invitational.jp/":http://www.h-invitational.jp/) is a comprehensive annotation resource for human transcriptome. By extensive analyses of all human transcripts, we provide curated annotations of human genes, transcripts and proteins that include gene structures, alternative splicing isoforms, non-coding functional RNAs, protein functions, functional domains, sub-cellular localizations, metabolic pathways, protein 3D structure, genetic polymorphisms, relation with diseases, gene expression profiling, molecular evolutionary features, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and gene families/groups. The latest release of H-InvDB (release 7.0) provides annotation for 296,912 human transcripts in 46,499 human gene clusters based on human full-length cDNAs, mRNAs and the reference human genome sequences (NCBI b37.1). H-InvDB consists of three main views, the Transcript view, the Locus view and the Protein view, and six sub-databases; G-integra, H-ANGEL, DiseaseInfo Viewer, Evola, PPI view and Gene Family/Group view. We also provide data mining tools such as “Navigation search”, an extended search system that enables complicated searches by combining 16 different search options ("http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/c-search/hinvNaviTop.jsp":http://www.h-invitational.jp/hinv/c-search/hinvNaviTop.jsp) and “H-InvDB Enrichment Analysis Tool (HEAT)”, a data mining tool for automatically identifying features specific to a given human gene set ("http://hinv.jp/HEAT/":http://hinv.jp/HEAT/).
    Nature Precedings

Publication Stats

792 Citations
112.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • National Institute of Genetics
      • Center for Information Biology
      Mishima, Shizuoka-ken, Japan
  • 2004–2010
    • National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
      • Biomedicinal Information Research Center
      Japan