María S García-Gutiérrez

Instituto de Neurociencias, Alicante, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (29)120.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Stress-exposure produces excitoxicity and neuroinflammation, contributing to the cellular damage observed in stress-related neuropathologies. The endocannabinoid system is present in stress-responsive neural circuits and it is emerging as a homeostatic system. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible regulatory role of cannabinoid-2 receptor in stress-induced excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Different genetic and pharmacological approaches were used: 1) Wild type (WT), transgenic over-expressing CB2 receptor (CB2xP) and CB2 receptor knockout (CB2-KO) mice were exposed to immobilization/acoustic stress (2h/day for 4 days), and 2) the CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 was administered daily (2 mg kg(-1) , i.p.) to WT and CB2 receptor-KO animals. Stress-induced HPA axis activation was not modified by CB2 receptor manipulations. JWH-133 treatment or overexpression of CB2 resulted in an increase of control levels of glutamate uptake, which is then reduced by stress exposure back to control levels. JWH-133 prevented the stress-induced increase in the cytokines TNF-α and MCP-1, the nuclear factor kappa B, the enzymes inducible nitric oxide synthase 2 and cyclooxygenase-2 and the cellular oxidative/nitrosative damage (lipid peroxidation) in brain frontal cortex. CB2xP mice displayed anti-inflammatory/neuroprotective actions similar to those observed in JWH-133 pre-treated animals. Conversely, CB2-KO mice experiments indicated that the lack of CB2 receptor exacerbated stress-induced neuroinflammatory responses and validated the CB2 receptor-dependent effects of JWH-133. These results suggest that pharmacological manipulation of CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of stress-related pathologies with a neuroinflammatory component, such as depression.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 01/2014; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have associated alterations of neuronal plasticity in specific brain areas with suicidal behavior. The Notch signaling pathway plays a relevant role in the control of stem cell maintenance, cell migration, and neuronal plasticity. In the present study, the gene expression of the four Notch receptors (NOTCH1-4), the five canonical ligands (DLL1, DLL3, DLL4, JAGGED1, and JAGGED2), the two non-canonical ligands (DLK1 and DLK2), and the transcription factors (HES1, HEY1, and HEY2) were measured in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and amygdala (AMY) of suicide victims (S; n = 13 males, with no clinical psychiatric history and non-treated with anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs) and their corresponding controls (C; n = 13 males) by real-time PCR. The results revealed a reduction of NOTCH2 and NOTCH1, NOTCH3, and NOTCH4 gene expression in the DLPFC and AMY of S compared with C, respectively. DLL1 levels were increased in the DLPFC and decreased in the AMY, whereas DLL4, JAGGED1, and JAGGED2 were significantly decreased in the regions analyzed. DLK1 was reduced in the AMY, whereas no changes were observed in the DLPFC and in DLK2 expression levels in any of the regions analyzed. HES1 was significantly reduced in both brain regions from S, whereas there were no significant changes in HEY1 and HEY2. This study provides evidence suggesting that the Notch signaling pathway could be a potential key target in the treatment of suicidal behaviors.
    Molecular Neurobiology 10/2013; · 5.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examines the role of the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2 r) on the vulnerability to ethanol consumption. The time-related and dose-response effects of ethanol on rectal temperature, handling-induced convulsions (HIC) and blood ethanol concentrations were evaluated in CB2 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. The reinforcing properties of ethanol were evaluated in conditioned place preference (CPP), preference and voluntary ethanol consumption and oral ethanol self-administration. Water-maintained behavior schedule was performed to evaluate the degree of motivation induced by a natural stimulus. Preference for non-alcohol tastants assay was performed to evaluate the differences in taste sensitivity. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions were also measured in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), respectively. CB2 KO mice presented increased HIC score, ethanol-CPP, voluntary ethanol consumption and preference, acquisition of ethanol self-administration, and increased motivation to drink ethanol compared with WT mice. No differences were found between genotypes in the water-maintained behavior schedule or preference for non-alcohol tastants. Naïve CB2 KO mice presented increased μ-opioid receptor gene expression in NAcc. Acute ethanol administration (1-2 g/kg) increased TH and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions in CB2 KO mice, whereas the lower dose of ethanol decreased TH gene expression in WT mice. These results suggest that deletion of the CB2 r gene increased preference for and vulnerability to ethanol consumption, at least in part, by increased ethanol-induced sensitivity of the TH and μ-opioid receptor gene expressions in mesolimbic neurons. Future studies will determine the role of CB2 r as a target for the treatment of problems related with alcohol consumption.
    Addiction Biology 07/2013; · 5.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was aimed to evaluate the involvement of CB2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2r) in the rewarding, reinforcing and motivational effects of nicotine. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and intravenous self-administration experiments were carried out in knock-out mice lacking CB2r (CB2KO) and in wild-type (WT) littermates treated with the CB2r antagonist AM630 (1 and 3 mg/Kg). Gene expression analyses of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), α3- and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits (nAChRs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and immunohistochemical studies to elucidate if CB2r co-localized with α3- and α4-nAChRs in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and VTA were performed. Mecamylamine-precipitated withdrawal syndrome after chronic nicotine exposure was evaluated in CB2KO mice and in WT mice treated with AM630 (1 and 3 mg/Kg). CB2KO mice did not show nicotine-induced place conditioning and self-administered significantly less nicotine. In addition, AM630 was able to block (3 mg/Kg) nicotine-induced CPP and reduce (1 and 3 mg/Kg) nicotine self-administration. Under baseline conditions, TH, α3- and α4-nAChRs mRNA levels in the VTA of CB2KO mice were significantly lower compared with WT mice. Confocal microscopy images revealed that CB2r co-localized with α3- and α4-nAChRs. Somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal (rearings, groomings, scratches, teeth chattering and body tremors) increased significantly in WT but were absent in CB2KO mice. Interestingly, the administration of AM630 blocked the nicotine withdrawal syndrome and failed to alter basal behavior in saline-treated WT mice. These results suggest that CB2r play a relevant role in the reinforcing and motivational effects of nicotine. Pharmacological manipulation of this receptor deserves further consideration as a potential new valuable target for the treatment of nicotine dependence.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 2 July 2013. doi:10.1038/npp.2013.157.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 07/2013; · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CB 2 r Mice lacking CB 2 r Memory Cannabinoid CB 2 r-agonist JWH133 Immunohistochemistry Rt-PCR a b s t r a c t In this study, the role of CB 2 r on aversive memory consolidation was further evaluated. Mice lacking CB 2 r (CB2KO) and their corresponding littermates (WT) were exposed to the step-down inhibitory avoidance test (SDIA). MAP2, NF200 and synaptophysin (SYN)-immunoreactive fibers were studied in the hippo-campus (HIP) of both genotypes. The number of synapses, postsynaptic density thickness and the relation between the synaptic length across the synaptic cleft and the distance between the synaptic ends were evaluated in the HIP (dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 fields) by electron microscopy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene expressions and mTOR/ p70S6K signaling cascade were evaluated in the HIP and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Finally, the effects of acute administration of CB 2 r-agonist JWH133 or CB 2 r-antagonist AM630 on memory consolidation were evaluated in WT mice by using the SDIA. The lack of CB 2 r impaired aversive memory consolidation, reduced MAP2, NF200 and SYN-immunoreactive fibers and also reduced the number of synapses in DG of CB2KO mice. BDNF and NR3C1 gene expression were reduced in the HIP of CB2KO mice. An increase of p-p70S6K (T389 and S424) and p-AKT protein expression was observed in the HIP and PFC of CB2KO mice. Interestingly, administration of AM630 impaired aversive memory consolidation, whereas JWH133 enhanced it. Further functional and molecular assessments would have been helpful to further support our conclusions. These results revealed that CB 2 r are involved in memory consolidation, suggesting that this re-ceptor could be a promising target for developing novel treatments for different cognitive impairment-related disorders.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the role of CB2r on aversive memory consolidation was further evaluated. Mice lacking CB2r (CB2KO) and their corresponding littermates (WT) were exposed to the step-down inhibitory avoidance test (SDIA). MAP2, NF200 and synaptophysin (SYN)-immunoreactive fibers were studied in the hippocampus (HIP) of both genotypes. The number of synapses, postsynaptic density thickness and the relation between the synaptic length across the synaptic cleft and the distance between the synaptic ends were evaluated in the HIP (dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 fields) by electron microscopy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene expressions and mTOR/p70S6K signaling cascade were evaluated in the HIP and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Finally, the effects of acute administration of CB2r-agonist JWH133 or CB2r-antagonist AM630 on memory consolidation were evaluated in WT mice by using the SDIA. The lack of CB2r impaired aversive memory consolidation, reduced MAP2, NF200 and SYN-immunoreactive fibers and also reduced the number of synapses in DG of CB2KO mice. BDNF and NR3C1 gene expression were reduced in the HIP of CB2KO mice. An increase of p-p70S6K (T389 and S424) and p-AKT protein expression was observed in the HIP and PFC of CB2KO mice. Interestingly, administration of AM630 impaired aversive memory consolidation, whereas JWH133 enhanced it. Further functional and molecular assessments would have been helpful to further support our conclusions. These results revealed that CB2r are involved in memory consolidation, suggesting that this receptor could be a promising target for developing novel treatments for different cognitive impairment-related disorders.
    Neuropharmacology 06/2013; · 4.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent reports suggest that FKBP5 gene and its corresponding FKBP5 protein play a relevant role in the regulation of anxiety and depression in animal models and human stress-related disorders. In the present study, FKBP5 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene and protein expression were analyzed in the amygdala (AMY) of suicide victims (n=13 males, without clinical psychiatric history and non-treated with anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs) and its corresponding controls (n=13 males) by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The results revealed that FKBP5 and GR gene expression were significantly reduced in the AMY (-38% and -48%, respectively) of suicide victims compared with controls. Interestingly, FKBP5 and GR protein expression were also significantly decreased (-41% and -42%, respectively) in the AMY of suicide victims compared with controls. These results suggest that the FKBP5 plays a relevant role in human emotional responses and suggest this receptor as a new promising target in the treatment of suicide behavior.
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 12/2012; · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence obtained in humans and rodents indicates that beta-endorphin (encoded by the proopiomelanocortin [POMC] gene) is critical in the regulation of alcohol drinking behavior. However, the alcohol effect on POMC gene expression has not been studied in rodent mesolimbic regions, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc). METHODS: In this study, we first utilized POMC-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice to visualize POMC neurons and found that POMC-EGFP cells were modestly distributed throughout the NAc shell and core, in addition to the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. POMC mRNA expression in the NAc of mice and rats was confirmed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and solution hybridization assays. We then investigated whether there are genetically determined differences in basal mRNA levels of POMC and mu opioid receptor (MOP-r) between selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and nonpreferring (sNP) rats, and whether these mRNA levels are altered in sP rats after alcohol drinking (10%, unlimited access) for 17 days. RESULTS: Alcohol-naïve sP rats had higher basal POMC mRNA levels than sNP rats only in hypothalamus. Alcohol drinking increased POMC mRNA levels in both the NAc shell (by 100%) and the hypothalamus (by 50%) of sP rats. Although sP rats had lower basal levels of MOP-r mRNA and GTPγS binding in NAc shell than sNP rats, voluntary alcohol consumption had no effect on MOP-r mRNA levels in the NAc shell. CONCLUSIONS: Our results define the distribution of POMC-expressing neurons in the NAc of mice and rats. Higher POMC expression at basal levels in sP rats (genetically determined), along with increases after drinking (alcohol-induced) in the NAc shell and hypothalamus, suggests that the POMC systems play a role in high alcohol preference and consumption.
    Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research 06/2012; · 3.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dopamine (DA) neurons not only show a pattern signaling the magnitude, delay and probability of rewards but also code negative motivation and aversive events. Beside DA, other systems such as noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) may also be implicated in naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA; an index of the aversive consequences of withdrawal). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate: (i) the turnover of DA, NA and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), one of the most important substrates for aversive states, (ii) the changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene expression in the ventral tegmental area, and (iii) total TH protein levels and TH phosphorylation in the NAc after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. DA, NA and 5-HT turnover was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). TH gene expression was determined by real time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and total TH and TH phosphorylated at Ser31 and Ser40 were analyzed by Western blot. Present results show that the aversion for environmental cues paired with opioid withdrawal was higher than that observed in the saline group treated with naloxone, which indicates that morphine pretreatment potentiated the ability of naloxone to produce place aversion. In addition, present data show that naloxone-induced CPA positively correlated with an increase of DA and NA turnover in the NAc, which paralleled an increase in TH gene expression in the VTA and TH phosphorylation and enhanced TH protein levels in the NAc. Thus, the present study indicates that naloxone-induced aversion in morphine-dependent mice enhances DA and NA activity in the NAc and suggests that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of TH could be involved in the hyperactivity of mesolimbic dopaminergic system observed in morphine-withdrawn mice.
    Neurochemistry International 06/2012; 61(3):433-40. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation, has an important role in the main aspects of energy balance (i.e. food intake, energy expenditure and glucose and fat metabolism), orchestrating all the machinery involved in body weight control and energy homeostasis. A number of studies have revealed a crucial role of brain CB1 receptors in these processes. However, functional cannabinoid CB2 receptors have also been described in the brain, with no studies addressing their putative role in body weight control and glucose homeostasis. We have tested this hypothesis by analysing fasting-induced feeding, body weight, some hypothalamic neuropeptides, glucose tolerance and plasma hormones in an animal model specifically overexpressing CB2 receptors in the central nervous system. We found that specific overexpression of CB2 receptors in the brain promoted higher basal glucose levels, decreased fasting-induced feeding and, eventually, led to a lean phenotype and glucose intolerance. These findings could not be attributed to decreased locomotor activity, increased anxiety or depressive-like behaviours. The expression of relevant neuropeptides such as pro-opiomelanocortin and galanin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus was altered but not those of the CB1 receptor. Indeed, no changes in CB1 expression were found in the liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. However, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor expression in the endocrine pancreas and glucagon plasma levels were decreased. No changes in plasma adiponectin, leptin, insulin and somatostatin were found. Taken together, these results suggest a role for central cannabinoid CB2 receptors in body weight control and glucose homeostasis.
    Journal of Neuroendocrinology 04/2012; 24(8):1106-19. · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The potential involvement of the cannabinoid CB₂ receptors (CB₂r) in the adaptive responses induced by cocaine was studied in transgenic mice overexpressing the CB₂r (CB₂xP) and in wild-type (WT) littermates. For this purpose, the acute and sensitized locomotor responses to cocaine, conditioned place preference, and cocaine intravenous self-administration were evaluated. In addition, we assessed whether CB₂r were localized in neurons and/or astrocytes, and whether they colocalized with dopamine D1 and D2 receptors (D1Dr and D2Dr). Dopamine (DA) extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and DA transporter (DAT) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and μ-opioid and cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in the NAcc were also studied in both genotypes. CB₂xP mice showed decreased motor response to acute administration of cocaine (10-20 mg/kg) and cocaine-induced motor sensitization compared with WT mice. CB₂xP mice presented cocaine-induced conditioned place aversion and self-administered less cocaine than WT mice. CB₂r were found in neurons and astrocytes and colocalized with D2Dr in the VTA and NAcc. No significant differences in extracellular DA levels in the NAcc were observed between genotypes after cocaine administration. Under baseline conditions, TH and DAT gene expression was higher and μ-opioid receptor gene expression was lower in CB₂xP than in WT mice. However, both genotypes showed similar changes in TH and μ-opioid receptor gene expression after cocaine challenge independently of the pretreatment received. Importantly, the cocaine challenge decreased DAT gene expression to a lesser extent in cocaine-pretreated CB₂xP than in cocaine-pretreated WT mice. These results revealed that CB₂r are involved in cocaine motor responses and cocaine self-administration, suggesting that this receptor could represent a promising target to develop novel treatments for cocaine addiction.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 03/2012; 37(7):1749-63. · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the main causes of death worldwide. Inflammation accounts for a large part of damage in this pathology. The cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) has been proposed to have neuroprotective properties in neurological diseases. Therefore, our aim was to determine the effects of the activation of CB2R on infarct outcome and on ischemia-induced brain expression of classic and alternative markers of macrophage/microglial activation. Swiss wild-type and CB2R knockout male mice were subjected to a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Mice were treated with either a CB2R agonist (JWH-133), with or without a CB2R antagonist (SR144528) or vehicle. Infarct outcome was determined by measuring infarct volume and neurological outcome. An additional group of animals was used to assess mRNA and protein expression of CB2R, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory peptide (MIP) -1α, RANTES, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2, IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), arginase I, and Ym1. Administration of JWH-133 significantly improved infarct outcome, as shown by a reduction in brain infarction and neurological impairment. This effect was reversed by the CB2R antagonist and was absent in CB2R knockout mice. Concomitantly, administration of JWH-133 led to a lower intensity of Iba1+ microglia/macrophages and a decrease in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced gene expression of both classic (IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α, RANTES, and iNOS) and alternative mediators/markers (IL-10, TGF-β, and Ym1) of microglial/macrophage activation after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. The inhibitory effect of CB2R on the activation of different subpopulations of microglia/macrophages may account for the protective effect of the selective CB2R agonist JWH-133 after stroke.
    Stroke 01/2012; 43(1):211-9. · 6.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore the effects of CB(2) receptor agonist and antagonist in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviours. Effects of acute and chronic treatment with the CB(2) receptor agonist JWH133 and CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630 were evaluated in the light-dark box (LDB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests in Swiss ICR mice. CB(2) receptor, GABA(A) α(2) and GABA(A) γ(2) gene and protein expression in the cortex and amygdala of mice chronically treated with JWH133 or AM630 were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Effects of chronic AM630 treatment were evaluated in spontaneously anxious DBA/2 mice in LDB. Acute JWH133 treatment failed to produce any effect. Acute AM630 treatment increased anxiety and was blocked by pre-treatment with JWH133. Chronic JWH133 treatment increased anxiety-like behaviour whereas chronic AM630 treatment was anxiolytic in LDB and EPM tests. Chronic AM630 treatment increased gene and reduced protein expression of CB(2) receptors, GABA(A) α(2) and GABA(A) γ(2) in cortex and amygdala. Chronic JWH133 treatment resulted in opposite gene and protein alterations. In addition, chronic AM630 administration decreased the anxiety of DBA/2 mice in the LDB test. The opposing behavioural and molecular changes observed after chronic treatment with AM630 or JWH133 support the key role of CB(2) receptors in the regulation of anxiety. Indeed, the efficacy of AM630 in reducing the anxiety of the spontaneously anxious DBA/2 strain of mice strengthens the potential of the CB(2) receptor as a new target in the treatment of anxiety-related disorders.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 08/2011; 165(4):951-64. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The possible role of the CB(2) receptor (CB(2)r) in psychiatric disorders has been considered. Several animal models use knockout (KO) mice that display schizophrenia-like behaviors and this study evaluated the role of CB(2)r in the regulation of such behaviors. Mice lacking the CB(2)r (CB(2)KO) were challenged in open field, light-dark box, elevated plus-maze, tail suspension, step down inhibitory avoidance, and pre-pulse inhibition tests (PPI). Furthermore, the effects of treatment with cocaine and risperidone were evaluated using the OF and the PPI test. Gene expression of dopamine D(2) (D(2)r), adrenergic-α(2C) (α(2C)r), serotonergic 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors (5-HT(2A)r and 5-HT(2C)r) were studied by RT-PCR in brain regions related to schizophrenia. Deletion of CB(2)r decreased motor activity in the OF test, but enhanced response to acute cocaine and produced mood-related alterations, PPI deficit, and cognitive impairment. Chronic treatment with risperidone tended to impair PPI in WT mice, whereas it 'normalized' the PPI deficit in CB(2)KO mice. CB(2)KO mice presented increased D(2)r and α(2C)r gene expressions in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and locus coeruleus (LC), decreased 5-HT(2C)r gene expression in the dorsal raphe (DR), and 5-HT(2A)r gene expression in the PFC. Chronic risperidone treatment in WT mice left α(2C)r gene expression unchanged, decreased D(2)r gene expression (15 μg/kg), and decreased 5-HT(2C)r and 5-HT(2A)r in PFC and DR. In CB(2)KO, the gene expression of D(2)r in the PFC, of α(2C)r in the LC, and of 5-HT(2C)r and 5-HT(2A)r in PFC was reduced; 5-HT(2C)r and 5-HT(2A)r gene expressions in DR were increased after treatment with risperidone. These results suggest that deletion of CB(2)r has a relation with schizophrenia-like behaviors. Pharmacological manipulation of CB(2)r may merit further study as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of schizophrenia-related disorders.
    Neuropsychopharmacology: official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology 03/2011; 36(7):1489-504. · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study was undertaken to examine whether genetically predetermined differences in components of the endocannabinoid system were present in the brain of Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and Sardinian alcohol-non-preferring (sNP) rats, a pair of rat lines selectively bred for opposite alcohol preference. The effects of acquisition and maintenance of alcohol drinking, alcohol withdrawal, and alcohol re-exposure on the endocannabinoid system was also assessed in the striatum of sP rats. The findings revealed significantly higher density of the CB1 receptors and levels of CB1 receptor mRNA, CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein coupling, and endocannabinoids in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of alcohol-naive sP rats than sNP rats. A significantly lower expression of mFAAH enzyme was evident in the hippocampus of alcohol-naive sP rats. Alcohol drinking (during both acquisition and maintenance phases) in sP rats resulted in a significant reduction in striatal CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein coupling whereas alcohol withdrawal attenuated this effect. Alcohol consumption was also associated with markedly increased levels of endocannabinoids in the striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant (SR141716A) reduced alcohol intake, and reversed alcohol-induced changes in CB1 receptor-mediated G-protein activation. These findings provided a new insight into a potential genetic basis of excessive alcohol consumption, suggesting innate differences in the endocannabinoid system might be associated with higher alcohol preference in sP rats. The data also indicate a modulation of CB1 receptor-mediated signaling following alcohol consumption, and further strengthen the potential of the endocannabinoid system as a target for the treatment of alcohol related behaviors.
    Addiction Biology 02/2011; 17(1):62-75. · 5.91 Impact Factor
  • María S García-Gutiérrez, Jorge Manzanares
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    ABSTRACT: Mice overexpressing CB2r (CB2xP) were exposed to open field (OF), light-dark box (LDB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA were measured in paraventricular (PVN) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus after 30 minutes of restraint stress (RS). Anxiolytic effects of alprazolam (45 or 70 µg/kg, ip) were evaluated. GABA(A)α(2) and GABA(A)γ(2) mRNA were measured in the hippocampus (HIPP) and amygdala (AMY) of CB2xP and wild type (WT) mice. No differences were observed in the total distance travelled by CB2xP and WT mice in OF. Central and peripheral distances travelled significantly increased and decreased in CB2xP mice. Overexpression of CB2r reduced anxiety-like behaviours in LDB and EPM. In WT mice, RS increased CRF (82%) and POMC (42%) mRNA in the PVN and ARC nuclei, respectively. In CB2xP mice, RS also increased POMC (22%) mRNA in the ARC nucleus, but had no effect on CRF mRNA in the PVN nucleus. Administration of alprazolam was without effect in CB2xP mice. An increase of GABA(A)α(2) and GABA(A)γ(2) mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala of CB2xP mice was observed. Our findings revealed that increased expression of CB2r significantly reduced anxiogenic-related behaviours, modified the response to stress and impaired the action of anxiolytic drugs.
    Journal of Psychopharmacology 01/2011; 25(1):111-20. · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • M. S. García-Gutiérrez, J. Manzanares
    European Neuropsychopharmacology - EUR NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOL. 01/2011; 21.
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    ABSTRACT: Public concern on mental health has noticeably increased given the high prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders. Cognition and emotionality are the most affected functions in neuropsychiatric disorders, i.e., anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia. In this review, most relevant literature on the role of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in neuropsychiatric disorders will be presented. Evidence from clinical and animal studies is provided for the participation of CB1 and CB2 receptors (CB1R and CB2R) in the above mentioned neuropsychiatric disorders. CBRs are crucial in some of the emotional and cognitive impairments reported, although more research is required to understand the specific role of the eCB system in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotropic component of the Cannabis sativa plant, has shown therapeutic potential in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Although further studies are needed, recent studies indicate that CBD therapeutic effects may partially depend on facilitation of eCB-mediated neurotransmission. Last but not least, this review includes recent findings on the role of the eCB system in eating disorders. A deregulation of the eCB system has been proposed to be in the bases of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including eating disorders. Cannabis consumption has been related to the appearance of psychotic symptoms and schizophrenia. In contrast, the pharmacological manipulation of this eCB system has been proposed as a potential strategy for the treatment of anxiety disorders, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In conclusion, the eCB system plays a critical role in psychiatry; however, detrimental consequences of manipulating this endogenous system cannot be underestimated over the potential and promising perspectives of its therapeutic manipulation.
    Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 01/2011; 5:63. · 4.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by intracaudate administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was evaluated. 6-OHDA (12 μg/4 μL) or its vehicle was injected in the caudate-putamen (CPu) of mice overexpressing the CB2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2xP) and wild type (WT) mice. Motor impairment, emotional behavior, and cognitive alterations were evaluated. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) were measured by immunocytochemistry in the CPu and/or substantia nigra (SN) of CB2xP mice and WT mice. Oxidative/nitrosative and neuroinflammatory parameters were also measured in the CPu and cortex of 6-OHDA-treated and sham-treated mice. 6-OHDA-treated CB2xP mice presented significantly less motor deterioration than 6-OHDA-treated WT mice. Immunocytochemical analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase in the SN and CPu revealed significantly fewer lesions in CB2xP mice than in WT mice. GFAP and Iba-1 immunostaining revealed less astrocyte and microglia recruitment to the treated area of the CPu in CB2xP mice. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were lower in the striatum and cerebral cortex of sham-treated CB2xP mice than in sham-treated WT mice. The administration of 6-OHDA increased MDA levels in both WT mice and CB2xP mice; it increased the oxidized (GSSG)/reduced (GSH) glutathione ratio in the striatum in WT mice alone compared with matched sham-treated controls. The results revealed that overexpression of CB2 cannabinoid receptors decreased the extent of motor impairment and dopaminergic neuronal loss, reduced the recruitment of astrocytes and microglia to the lesion, and decreased the level of various oxidative parameters. These results suggest that CB2 receptors offer neuroprotection against dopaminergic injury.
    Neurobiology of aging 10/2010; 33(2):421.e1-16. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the role of CB(2) receptors in the regulation of depressive-like behaviours. Transgenic mice overexpressing the CB(2) receptor (CB2xP) were challenged with different types of acute and chronic experimental paradigms to evaluate their response in terms of depressive-like behaviours. Tail suspension test (TST), novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and unpredictable chronic mild stress tests (CMS) were carried out in CB2xP mice. Furthermore, acute and chronic antidepressant-like effects of the CB(2) receptor-antagonist AM630 were evaluated by means of the forced swimming test (FST) and CMS, respectively, in wild-type (WT) and CB2xP mice. CB(2) gene expression, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and protein expressions were studied in mice exposed to CMS by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Overexpression of CB(2) receptors resulted in decreased depressive-like behaviours in the TST and NSFT. CMS failed to alter the TST and sucrose consumption in CB2xP mice. In addition, no changes in BDNF gene and protein expression were observed in stressed CB2xP mice. Interestingly, acute administration of AM630 (1 and 3 mg x kg(-1), i.p.) exerted antidepressant-like effects on the FST in WT, but not in CB2xP mice. Chronic administration of AM630 for 4 weeks (1 mg x kg(-1); twice daily, i.p.) blocked the effects of CMS on TST, sucrose intake, CB(2) receptor gene, BDNF gene and protein expression in WT mice. Taken together, these results suggest that increased CB(2) receptor expression significantly reduced depressive-related behaviours and that the CB(2) receptor could be a new potential therapeutic target for depressive-related disorders.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 08/2010; 160(7):1773-84. · 5.07 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

256 Citations
120.41 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Instituto de Neurociencias
      Alicante, Valencia, Spain
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos III
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • University of Castilla-La Mancha
      Toledo, Castille-La Mancha, Spain
  • 2010–2013
    • Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Badajoz
      Ara Pacis Augustalis, Extremadura, Spain
    • Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
      • Departamento de Farmacología
      Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain
  • 2009–2013
    • Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche
      • Instituto de Neurociencias
      Elche, Valencia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Hospital Universitario San Juan De Alicante
      Alicante, Valencia, Spain