C E Salazar

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Michigan, United States

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Publications (3)8.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of a serine protease (AgSp24D) from the human malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, is presented. The gene product is a 271 amino acid protein that contains the conserved serine, histidine and aspartic acid residues found in serine proteases, and has the highest identity to a serine protease of unknown function from Drosophila melanogaster. In situ hybridization to the polytene chromosomes detects a single band at 24D. Northern analysis reveals only low levels of transcripts in larvae and pupae, but more abundant transcription products occur in adults. Interestingly, this analysis also shows that adult males express much higher levels of AgSp24D mRNA than females. In addition, Plasmodium-refractory mosquitoes express higher levels of AgSp24D mRNA than susceptible mosquitoes although the biological significance of this remains to be examined. The thorax is the primary site for expression in the adults. The lack of a dramatic increase in AgSp24D mRNA levels following blood feeding suggests that this protease is not involved in digestive processes. Transcriptional induction does not follow cold shock, septic wounding, bacterial injection, laminarin injection or CM-Sephadex bead injection.
    Insect Molecular Biology 12/1997; 6(4):385-95. DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2583.1997.00193.x · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Five actin genes have been identified in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, and a constitutively expressed actin gene has been chosen for detailed analysis. We have physically mapped and sequenced this gene and six associated cDNAs, including translated coding regions, as well as the 5' and 3' flanking sequences. Analysis of stage-specific RNA shows this gene to be present in all stages of mosquito development and in an established A. gambiae cell line, thus indicating a cytoskeletal actin. In the sequence of the translated coding region and in pattern of expression, this gene is very similar to the cytoskeletal actin genes of Drosophila melanogaster, and in sequence, equally similar to the Artemia cytoskeletal actin gene 403 (99.2% identity among the three amino acid sequences). Sequencing of this A. gambiae actin gene (designated act1D for its location in chromosome division 1D) and selected cDNAs shows that it possesses three alternative leader sequences; thus the gene appears to have three alternative promoters. These promoters should ultimately prove useful in the production of transgenic constructs for constitutive expression.
    Insect Molecular Biology 03/1994; 3(1):1-13. · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Five actin genes have been identified in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, and a constitutively expressed actin gene has been chosen for detailed analysis. We have physically mapped and sequenced this gene and six associated cDNAs, including translated coding regions, as well as the 5 and 3 flanking sequences. Analysis of stage-specific RNA shows this gene to be present in all stages of mosquito development and in an established A. gambiae cell line, thus indicating a cytoskeietal actin. In the sequence of the translated coding region and in pattern of expression, this gene is very similar to the cytoskeietal actin genes of Droso-phila melanogaster, and in sequence, equally similar to the Artemia cytoskeietal actin gene 403 (99.2% identity among the three amino acid sequences). Sequencing of this A. gambiae actin gene (designated actWior its location in chromosome division 1D) and selected cDNAs shows that it possesses three alternative leader sequences; thus the gene appears to have three alternative promoters. These promoters should ultimately prove useful in the production of transgenic constructs for constitutive expression.
    Insect Molecular Biology 01/1994; 3(1):1 - 13. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2583.1994.tb00145.x · 2.98 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

50 Citations
8.93 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria
      Atlanta, Michigan, United States
  • 1994
    • Emory University
      • Department of Biology
      Atlanta, GA, United States