Daniel Gale

University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, United States

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Publications (33)247.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee is often performed in patients who have knee symptoms of unclear cause. When meniscal tears are found, it is commonly assumed that the symptoms are attributable to them. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of meniscal damage in the general population and the association of meniscal tears with knee symptoms and with radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. We studied persons from Framingham, Massachusetts, who were drawn from census-tract data and random-digit telephone dialing. Subjects were 50 to 90 years of age and ambulatory; selection was not made on the basis of knee or other joint problems. We assessed the integrity of the menisci in the right knee on 1.5-tesla MRI scans obtained from 991 subjects (57% of whom were women). Symptoms involving the right knee were evaluated by questionnaire. The prevalence of a meniscal tear or of meniscal destruction in the right knee as detected on MRI ranged from 19% (95% confidence interval [CI], 15 to 24) among women 50 to 59 years of age to 56% (95% CI, 46 to 66) among men 70 to 90 years of age; prevalences were not materially lower when subjects who had had previous knee surgery were excluded. Among persons with radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence grade 2 or higher, on a scale of 0 to 4, with higher numbers indicating more definite signs of osteoarthritis), the prevalence of a meniscal tear was 63% among those with knee pain, aching, or stiffness on most days and 60% among those without these symptoms. The corresponding prevalences among persons without radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis were 32% and 23%. Sixty-one percent of the subjects who had meniscal tears in their knees had not had any pain, aching, or stiffness during the previous month. Incidental meniscal findings on MRI of the knee are common in the general population and increase with increasing age.
    New England Journal of Medicine 10/2008; 359(11):1108-15. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to determine whether markers of bone resorption and formation could serve as markers for the presence of bone marrow lesions (BMLs). We conducted an analysis of data from the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). Knee magnetic resonance images were scored for BMLs using a semiquantitative grading scheme. In addition, a subset of persons with BMLs underwent quantitative volume measurement of their BML, using a proprietary software method. Within the BOKS population, 80 people with BMLs and 80 without BMLs were selected for the purposes of this case-control study. Bone biomarkers assayed included type I collagen N-telopeptide (NTx) corrected for urinary creatinine, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin. The same methods were used and applied to a nested case-control sample from the Framingham study, in which BMD assessments allowed evaluation of this as a covariate. Logistic regression models were fit using BML as the outcome and biomarkers, age, sex, and body mass index as predictors. An receiver operating characteristic curve was generated for each model and the area under the curve assessed. A total of 151 subjects from BOKS with knee OA were assessed. The mean (standard deviation) age was 67 (9) years and 60% were male. Sixty-nine per cent had maximum BML score above 0, and 48% had maximum BML score above 1. The only model that reached statistical significance used maximum score of BML above 0 as the outcome. Ln-NTx (Ln is the natural log) exhibited a significant association with BMLs, with the odds of a BML being present increasing by 1.4-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.0-fold to 2.0-fold) per 1 standard deviation increase in the LnNTx, and with a small partial R2 of 3.05. We also evaluated 144 participants in the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study, whose mean age was 68 years and body mass index was 29 kg/m2, and of whom 40% were male. Of these participants 55% had a maximum BML score above 0. The relationship between NTx and maximum score of BML above 0 revealed a significant association, with an odds ratio fo 1.7 (95% confidence interval = 1.1 to 2.7) after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index. Serum NTx was weakly associated with the presence of BMLs in both study samples. This relationship was not strong and we would not advocate the use of NTx as a marker of the presence of BMLs.
    Arthritis research & therapy 09/2008; 10(4):R102. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: MRI provides unparalleled visualisation of all the anatomical structures involved in the osteoarthritis (OA) process. There is a need for reliable methods of quantifying abnormalities of these structures. The aim of this work was to assess the reliability of a novel MRI scoring system for evaluating OA of the knee and explore the validity of the bone marrow lesion (BML) scoring component of this new tool. After review of the relevant literature, a collaborative group of rheumatologists and radiologists from centres in the UK and USA established preliminary anatomical divisions, items (necessarily broadly inclusive) and scaling for a novel semi-quantitative knee score. A series of iterative reliability exercises were performed to reduce the initial items, and the reliability of the resultant Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) was examined. A further sample had both the BLOKS and WORMS (Whole Organ MRI Score) bone marrow lesion (BML) score performed to assess the construct validity (relation to knee pain) and longitudinal validity (prediction of cartilage loss) of each scoring method. The BLOKS scoring method assesses nine intra-articular regions and contains eight items, including features of bone marrow lesions, cartilage, osteophytes, synovitis, effusions and ligaments. The scaling for each feature ranges from 0-3. The inter-reader reliability for the final BLOKS items ranged from 0.51 for meniscal extrusion up to 0.79 for meniscal tear. The reliability for other key features was 0.72 for BML grade, 0.72 for cartilage morphology, and 0.62 for synovitis. Maximal BML size on the BLOKS scale had a positive linear relation with visual analogue scale (VAS) pain, however the WORMS scale did not. Baseline BML was associated with cartilage loss on both BLOKS and WORMS scale. This association was stronger for BLOKS than WORMS. We have designed a novel scoring system for MRI OA knee, BLOKS, that demonstrates good reliability. Preliminary inspection of the validity of one of the components of this new tool supports the validity of the BLOKS BML scoring method over an existing instrument. Further iterative development will include validation for use in both clinical trials and epidemiological studies.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 03/2008; 67(2):206-11. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medial and lateral compartment bone marrow lesions (BMLs) have been tied to cartilage loss. We undertook this study to assess 2 types of BMLs in the central region of the knee (type 1 BMLs, which are related anatomically to anterior cruciate ligament [ACL]/posterior cruciate ligament [PCL] insertions, and type 2 BMLs, which encompass both the central region and either the medial or the lateral compartment) and determine their relationship to cartilage loss and ACL tears. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee was performed at baseline and at followup (15 and/or 30 months) in 258 subjects with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA). At baseline, we assessed ACL tears and central BMLs located at or between the tibial spines or adjacent to the femoral notch. Cartilage loss was present if the score in any region of the tibiofemoral joint increased by >or= 1 units at the last available followup, using a modified Whole-Organ MRI Score. We used logistic regression adjusted for alignment, body mass index, Kellgren/Lawrence score, sex, and age. One hundred thirty-nine knees (53.8%) had central BMLs, of which 129 had type 1 BMLs (96 abutted the ACL and had no coexistent type 2 features) and 25 had type 2 BMLs (often overlapped with type 1). Type 1 lesions were associated with ACL tears (odds ratio [OR] 5.9, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.2-16.2) but not with cartilage loss (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.8-3.1), while medial type 2 BMLs were related to medial cartilage loss (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.0-35.2). Central BMLs that abutted the ACL were highly prevalent and strongly related to ACL pathology, suggesting a role of enthesopathy in OA. Only BMLs with medial extension were related to ipsilateral cartilage loss.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 01/2008; 58(1):130-6. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationship between longitudinal fluctuations in synovitis with change in pain and cartilage in knee osteoarthritis. Study subjects were patients 45 years of age and older with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis from the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study. Baseline and follow-up assessments at 15 and 30 months included knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), BMI and pain assessment (VAS) over the last week. Synovitis was scored at 3 locations (infrapatellar fat pad, suprapatellar and intercondylar regions) using a semiquantitative scale (0-3) at all 3 time points on MRI. Scores at each site were added to give a summary synovitis score (0-9). We assessed 270 subjects whose mean (SD) age was 66.7 (9.2) years, BMI 31.5 (5.7) kg/m(2); 42% were female. There was no correlation of baseline synovitis with baseline pain score (r = 0.09, p = 0.17). The change in summary synovitis score was correlated with the change in pain (r = 0.21, p = 0.0003). An increase of one unit in summary synovitis score resulted in a 3.15-mm increase in VAS pain score (0-100 scale). Effusion change was not associated with pain change. Of the 3 locations for synovitis, changes in the infrapatellar fat pad were most strongly related to pain change. Despite cartilage loss occurring in over 50% of knees, synovitis was not associated with cartilage loss in either tibiofemoral or patellofemoral compartment. Change in synovitis was correlated with change in knee pain, but not loss of cartilage. Treatment of pain in knee osteoarthritis (OA) needs to consider treatment of synovitis.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 01/2008; 66(12):1599-603. · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to examine the association between patellofemoral (PF) alignment (using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images of extended knees) and knee pain and function. Subjects were recruited to participate in a natural history study of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis, called the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). The association of predictive variable (patellar alignment in sagittal and transverse planes) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function were examined using a linear regression model while adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score and Kellgren and Lawrence score. Increasing trochlear angle (TA) was associated with both WOMAC (P=0.06) pain and WOMAC function subscale (P=0.04). Increasing lateral patellar title angle (LPTA) and decreasing bisect offset (increasing lateral subluxation) appeared to be associated with increasing WOMAC pain. However, no such an association was observed for other predictors. The findings of the present study suggest that increasing TA is associated with increased functional impairment. Other measures of PF malalignment were not significantly associated with either knee pain or functional impairment.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 12/2007; 15(11):1235-40. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between patellar alignment (using standard MRI images of extended knees) and MRI indices of patellofemoral (PF) osteoarthritis (OA) features. In this cross-sectional observational study, subjects were recruited to participate in the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS). The association of patellar alignment [patellar length ratio (PLR), sulcus angle (SA), lateral patellar tilt angle (LPTA) and bisect offset (BO)] with measures of PF OA [cartilage morphology and bone marrow lesion (BML) in the medial and lateral PF compartment] were examined using a logistic regression model while adjusting for age, sex and BMI. Study sample comprised 126 males (mean age 68.0, BMI 31.2) and 87 females (mean age 64.7, BMI 31.6). All measurements of patellar alignment were statistically significantly associated with cartilage morphology and BML in the lateral compartment of PF joint. PLR and SA were significantly associated with medial cartilage loss. With increasing PLR there was an increased prevalence of lateral and medial cartilage loss as well as of lateral BML. Increasing SA was positively associated with increased lateral and medial cartilage loss and lateral BML. LPTA range was negatively associated with lateral cartilage loss and BML. More laterally displaced patella (higher BO) was associated with increased lateral cartilage loss and BML. The results of our study clearly indicated that patellar alignment is associated with manifestations of PF OA such as cartilage thickness loss and BML.
    Rheumatology 09/2007; 46(8):1303-8. · 4.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uncertainty exists regarding the optimal workup of patients with suspected osteomyelitis of the foot, many of whom have diabetes mellitus. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the diagnostic test performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for osteomyelitis of the foot and compared this performance with that of technetium Tc 99m bone scanning, plain radiography, and white blood cell studies. We searched MEDLINE (from 1966 to week 3 of June 2006) and EMBASE (from 1980 to week 3 of June 2006) for English-language studies in which adults suspected of having osteomyelitis of the foot or ankle were evaluated by MRI. We then extracted data using a standard form derived from the Cochrane Methods Group. To summarize the performance of diagnostic tests, we used the summary receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, which relies on the calculation of the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). We also examined subsets of studies defined by the presence or absence of particular design flaws or populations. Sixteen studies met inclusion criteria. In all studies combined, the DOR for MRI was 42.1 (95% confidence interval, 14.8-119.9), and the specificity at a 90% sensitivity cut point was 82.5%. The DOR did not vary greatly among subsets of studies. In studies in which a direct comparison could be made with other technologies, the DOR for MRI was consistently better than that for bone scanning (7 studies-149.9 vs 3.6), plain radiography (9 studies-81.5 vs 3.3), and white blood cell studies (3 studies-120.3 vs 3.4). We found that MRI performs well in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot and ankle and can be used to rule in or rule out the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging performance was markedly superior to that of technetium Tc 99m bone scanning, plain radiography, and white blood cell studies.
    Archives of Internal Medicine 02/2007; 167(2):125-32. · 11.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mammalian endothelial cells (ECs) display marked phenotypic heterogeneity. Little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms underlying EC heterogeneity. The last common ancestor of hagfish and gnathostomes was also the last common ancestor of all extant vertebrates, which lived some time more than 500 million years ago. Features of ECs that are shared between hagfish and gnathostomes can be inferred to have already been present in this ancestral vertebrate. The goal of this study was to determine whether the hagfish endothelium displays phenotypic heterogeneity. Electron microscopy of the aorta, dermis, heart, and liver revealed ultrastructural heterogeneity of the endothelium. Immunofluorescent studies demonstrated marked differences in lectin binding between vascular beds. Intravital microscopy of the dermis revealed histamine-induced adhesion of leukocytes in capillaries and postcapillary venules, but no such adhesion in arterioles. Together, these data suggest that structural, molecular, and functional heterogeneity of the endothelium evolved as an early feature of this cell lineage.
    Blood 02/2007; 109(2):613-5. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between patellar alignment by using magnetic resonance imaging images and radiographic manifestations of patello-femoral osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects were recruited to participate in a natural history study of symptomatic knee OA. We examined the relation of patellar alignment in the sagittal plane (patellar length ratio (PLR)) and the transverse plane (sulcus angle (SA), lateral patellar tilt angle (LPTA), and bisect offset (BO)) to radiographic features of patello-femoral OA, namely joint space narrowing and patellar osteophytes, using a proportional odds logistic regression model while adjusting for age, sex, and bone mass index (BMI). The study sample consisted of 126 males (average age 68.0 years, BMI 31.2) and 87 females (average age 64.7 years, BMI 31.6), 75% of whom had tibiofemoral OA (a Kellgren-Lawrence score of 2 or more). PLR showed a statistically significant association with joint space narrowing and osteophytosis in the lateral compartment. SA showed significant association with medial joint space narrowing and with lateral and medial patellar osteophytosis. LPTA and BO showed significant association with both radiographic indices of the lateral compartment. Clear linear trends were found in association between PLR, LPTA and BO, and with outcomes associated with lateral patello-femoral OA. SA, LPTA, and BO showed linear trends of association with medial joint space narrowing. Results of our study clearly suggest the association between indices of patellar alignment and such features of patello-femoral OA as osteophytosis and joint space narrowing. Additional studies will be required to establish the normal and abnormal ranges of patellar alignment indices and their longitudinal relation to patello-femoral OA.
    Arthritis research & therapy 02/2007; 9(2):R26. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age-related changes in articular cartilage are likely to play a role in the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA). One of the major changes in the extracellular matrix of cartilage is the age-related accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Pentosidine, an AGE crosslink, is one of the few characterized AGEs and is considered an adequate marker for the many AGEs that are formed in vivo. We used data from a longitudinal observation study to determine if urinary pentosidine could serve as a marker to predict cartilage loss. We conducted a prospective analysis of data from the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study (BOKS); a completed natural history study of knee OA. All subjects in the study met American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for knee OA. Knee magnetic resonance (MR) images were scored for cartilage in 14 plates of the knee using the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) semiquantitative grading scheme. Within the BOKS population, a nested sample of 127 subjects (39% of the whole sample) who had both baseline pentosidine and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements (MRIs performed at baseline and 30 months later) was assessed. Urinary pentosidine was assayed and normalized to creatinine to account for differences in urine concentrations. We analyzed the data using three different methods to assess if baseline measures of pentosidine predicted subsequent cartilage loss on MRI. These were (1) analysis 1: logistic regression with the outcome cartilage loss in any plate; (2) analysis 2: proportional odds model where the outcome was defined as 0=no cartilage loss, 1=cartilage loss in one plate, 2=cartilage loss in two plates, and 3=cartilage loss in at least three plates; and (3) analysis 3: Poisson regression with the outcome the number of plates with cartilage loss. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI). At baseline the mean (standard deviation) age was 67 (9) years and 54% were male. The results for the three analytic steps are as follows: Analysis 1: the odds ratio for cartilage loss is 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.09) with 1 unit increase in pentosidine. Analysis 2: the odds ratio for more cartilage loss is 0.99 (95% CI 0.92-1.06) with 1 unit increase in pentosidine. Analysis 3: the relative number of plates with cartilage loss decreased was 1.00 (95% CI 0.95-1.03) with a 1 unit increase in pentosidine. Urinary pentosidine does not predict knee cartilage loss. Previous studies have suggested that local content within cartilage of AGEs is elevated in persons at high risk for progression. Our data suggest that these changes are not measurable systemically. Alternatively, urinary pentosidine levels reflect cartilage degradation in all joints (thus whole body cartilage breakdown) and may therefore not relate to OA severity in a single knee joint.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 02/2007; 15(1):93-7. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the relative contribution of hyaline cartilage morphologic features and the meniscus to the radiographic joint space. The Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study is a natural history study of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). Baseline and 30-month followup assessments included knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluoroscopically positioned weight-bearing knee radiographs. Cartilage and meniscal degeneration were scored on MRI in the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints using a semiquantitative grading system. Meniscal position was measured to the nearest millimeter. The dependent variable was joint space narrowing (JSN) on the plain radiograph (possible range 0-3). The predictor variables were MRI cartilage score, meniscal degeneration, and meniscal position measures. We first conducted a cross-sectional analysis using multivariate regression to determine the relative contribution of meniscal factors and cartilage morphologic features to JSN, adjusting for body mass index (BMI), age, and sex. The same approach was used for change in JSN and change in predictor variables. We evaluated 264 study participants with knee OA (mean age 66.7 years, 59% men, mean BMI 31.4 kg/m(2)). The results from the models demonstrated that meniscal position and meniscal degeneration each contributed to prediction of JSN, in addition to the contribution by cartilage morphologic features. For change in medial joint space, both change in meniscal position and change in articular cartilage score contributed substantially to narrowing of the joint space. The meniscus (both its position and degeneration) accounts for a substantial proportion of the variance explained in JSN, and the change in meniscal position accounts for a substantial proportion of change in JSN.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 09/2006; 54(8):2488-95. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although bone marrow lesions (BMLs) are powerful predictors of joint space loss as visualized on radiographs, the natural history of these lesions, their relationship to cartilage loss, and the association between change in these lesions and cartilage loss are unknown. These questions were tested using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in a natural history study of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). MRI of the knee was performed at baseline, 15 months, and 30 months in 217 patients with primary knee OA (122 men, 95 women; mean +/- SD age 66.4 +/- 9.4 years). To assess mechanical alignment, long-limb films were obtained at 15 months. Subchondral bone marrow abnormalities, graded in the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints, were defined as poorly marginated areas of increased signal intensity in the marrow on fat-suppressed, T2-weighted images. Cartilage morphologic features in the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints were scored at all time points using a semiquantitative scale. For each of the medial and lateral compartments, generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the longitudinal relationship of tibiofemoral BMLs to the tibiofemoral cartilage score, with adjustment for malalignment. Fifty-seven percent of knees had BMLs at baseline, of which 99% remained the same or increased in size at followup. Knee compartments with a higher baseline BML score had greater cartilage loss. An increase in BMLs was strongly associated with further worsening of the cartilage score. Enlarging or new BMLs occurred mostly in malaligned limbs, on the side of the malalignment (e.g., new medial BMLs in varus-aligned knees). The association of BML change with medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss was not significant after adjusting for alignment. Lesions of the bone marrow are unlikely to resolve and often get larger over time. Compared with BMLs that stay the same, enlarging BMLs are strongly associated with more cartilage loss. Furthermore, any change in BML is mediated by limb alignment.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 06/2006; 54(5):1529-35. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our understanding of the local source of pain in osteoarthritis (OA) remains unclear. We undertook this study to determine if the presence of high-signal osteophytes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was associated with pain presence, location or severity. Subjects were chosen from the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study, a natural history study of symptomatic knee OA. Assessments included knee MRI, pain assessments and information on weight and height. Osteophyte signal was defined as areas of increased signal intensity in the osteophyte on fat-suppressed T2 weighted images, and graded in the joint margins where osteophyte size is graded. All patients were evaluated with the frequent knee symptoms question for pain presence, the Western Ontario McMasters Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) for pain severity, and location of self-reported pain was recorded as present or absent based on locations identified on a standardized diagram. The osteophyte signal measures anywhere within one given knee were summed, creating an osteophyte signal aggregate. Logistic regression was conducted with quartile of osteophyte signal aggregate as the independent predictor and frequent knee symptom question as the dependent outcome. Association between quartile of osteophyte signal aggregate and pain severity on WOMAC was assessed using a linear regression. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between compartment-specific high-signal osteophytes aggregates (independent variable) and compartment-specific knee pain (dependent variable). Analyses were adjusted for gender, body mass index (BMI), and age. Two hundred and seventeen subjects were included in this analysis. They were predominantly male and 75% of subjects had radiographic tibio-femoral (TF) OA, and the remainder had patello-femoral (PF) radiographic OA. We did not find any association of high-signal osteophytes with presence of pain, pain severity or self-reported pain location. High-signal osteophytes detected on MRI are not associated with the presence of pain, pain severity or the self-reported location of pain.
    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 06/2006; 14(5):413-7. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To explore the role of meniscal tears and meniscal malposition as risk factors for subsequent cartilage loss in subjects with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA). Study subjects were patients with symptomatic knee OA from the Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study. Baseline assessments included knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with followup MRI at 15 and 30 months. Cartilage and meniscal damage were scored on MRI in the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joints using the semiquantitative whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score. Tibiofemoral cartilage was scored on MR images of all 5 plates of each tibiofemoral joint, and the meniscal position was measured using eFilm Workstation software. A proportional odds logistic regression model with generalized estimating equations was used to assess the effect of each predictor (meniscal position factor and meniscal damage as dichotomous predictors in each model) on cartilage loss in each of the 5 plates within a compartment. Models were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), tibial width, and sex. We assessed 257 subjects whose mean +/- SD age was 66.6 +/- 9.2 years and BMI was 31.5 +/- 5.7 kg/m2; 42% of subjects were female, and 77% of knees had a Kellgren/Lawrence radiographic severity grade > or = 2. In the medial tibiofemoral joint, each measure of meniscal malposition was associated with an increased risk of cartilage loss. There was also a strong association between meniscal damage and cartilage loss. Since meniscal coverage and meniscal height diminished with subluxation, less coverage and reduced height also increased the risk of cartilage loss. This study highlights the importance of an intact and functioning meniscus in patients with symptomatic knee OA, since the findings demonstrate that loss of this function has important consequences for cartilage loss.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 04/2006; 54(3):795-801. · 7.48 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 01/2006; 14. · 4.26 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 01/2006; 14. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of tibiofemoral (TF) narrowing on lateral radiographic views. In a natural history study of symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), both lateral view and fluoroscopically positioned posteroanterior (PA) semiflexed view radiographs of the knee in 30 degrees of flexion and with weight bearing were obtained at baseline and at 30 months. Test-retest reliability was evaluated using repeat radiographs, with joint space width measured using electronic calipers. All radiographs were scored on a 0-3 scale, and progression of joint space loss was defined as narrowing of the joint space by 1 grade. We evaluated sensitivity to change compared with the PA view. We evaluated validity by examining whether knees with progression showed expected malalignment on full-limb films. Test-retest reliability of the TF joint space using the lateral view had a root mean square error of 0.303 mm, with 92.5% of repeats within 1 mm. More knees showed progression on the lateral view alone (n = 41) than on the PA view alone (n = 27). Compared with knees without joint space loss, knees with medial compartment loss on the lateral view only were more varus malaligned (P < 0.001), while those with lateral compartment loss were more valgus malaligned (P = 0.008). In the assessment of TF joint space loss, lateral view radiographs are reliable, valid, and more sensitive to change than fluoroscopically positioned PA radiographs.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 12/2005; 52(11):3542-7. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial condition. The progression of knee OA is determined in part by mechanical effects on local structures. One of the mechanical influences on cartilage loss is limb alignment. We explored the structural factors associated with malalignment in subjects with symptomatic OA. We conducted a cross-sectional assessment using The Boston Osteoarthritis of the Knee Study, a natural history study of symptomatic knee OA. Baseline assessments included knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and information on weight and height. Long-limb radiographs to assess mechanical alignment were obtained at 15 months. Subarticular bone attrition, meniscal degeneration, anterior and posterior cruciate ligament integrity, medial and lateral collateral ligament integrity, marginal osteophytes, and cartilage morphology were assessed on MRI using a semiquantitative, multi-feature scoring method (Whole-Organ MRI Score) for whole-organ evaluation of the knee that is applicable to conventional MRI techniques. We also quantified the following meniscal position measures on coronal MRI images in both medial and lateral compartments: subluxation, meniscal height, and meniscal covering of the tibial plateau. Using the long-limb radiographs, mechanical alignment was measured in degrees on a continuous scale. The purpose of this cross-sectional analysis was to determine the individual and relative contribution of various structural factors to alignment of the lower extremity. We assessed the cross-sectional association between various structural factors and alignment of the lower extremity using a linear regression model. The 162 subjects with all measures acquired had a mean age of 67.0 years (SD 9.2), body mass index 31.4 (SD 5.6); 30% were female and 77% of knees had a Kellgren-Lawrence grade > or = 2. The main univariate determinants of varus alignment in decreasing order of influence were medial bone attrition, medial meniscal degeneration, medial meniscal subluxation, and medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss. Multivariable analysis revealed that medial bone attrition and medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss explained more of the variance in varus malalignment than other variables. The main univariate determinants of valgus malalignment in decreasing order of influence were lateral tibiofemoral cartilage loss, lateral osteophyte score, and lateral meniscal degeneration. Cartilage loss has been thought to be the major determinant of alignment. We found that other factors including meniscal degeneration and position, bone attrition, osteophytes, and ligament damage contribute to the variance of malalignment. Further longitudinal analysis is required to determine cause and effect relationships. This should assist researchers in determining strategies to ameliorate the potent effects of this mechanical disturbance.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 11/2005; 32(11):2192-9. · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the relationship between radiographic progression of joint space narrowing and cartilage loss on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), and to investigate the location of MRI-based cartilage loss in the knee and its relation to radiographic progression. Two hundred twenty-four men and women (mean age 66 years) were studied. Radiographs and MRI of the more symptomatic knee were obtained at baseline and at 15- and 30-month followup. Radiographs of the knee (with weight-bearing) were read for joint space narrowing (scale 0-3), with progression defined as any worsening in score. We used a semiquantitative method to score cartilage morphology in all 5 regions of the tibiofemoral joint, and defined cartilage loss as an increase in score (scale 0-4) at any region. We examined the relationship between progression of joint space narrowing on radiographic images and cartilage loss on MRI, using a generalized estimating equation proportional odds logistic regression, adjusted for baseline cartilage score, age, body mass index, and sex. The medial and lateral compartments were analyzed separately. In the medial compartment, 104 knees (46%) had cartilage loss detected by MRI. The adjusted odds ratio was 3.7 (95% confidence interval 2.2-6.3) for radiographic progression being predictive of cartilage loss on MRI. However, there was still a substantial proportion of knees (80 of 189 [42%]) with cartilage loss visible on MRI when no radiographic progression was apparent. Cartilage loss occurred frequently in the central regions of the femur and tibia as well as the posterior femur region, but radiographic progression was less likely to be observed when posterior femur regions showed cartilage loss. Radiographic progression appeared specific (91%) but not sensitive (23%) for cartilage loss. Overall findings were similar for the lateral compartment. While our results provide longitudinal evidence that radiographic progression of joint space narrowing is predictive of cartilage loss assessed on MRI, radiography is not a sensitive measure, and if used alone, will miss a substantial proportion of knees with cartilage loss.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 11/2005; 52(10):3152-9. · 7.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
247.26 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2008
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      • Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 2006
    • Boston Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Karl Jaspers Society of North America
      United States
  • 2005–2006
    • VA Long Beach Healthcare System
      Long Beach, California, United States
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Division of Rheumatology
      Scottsdale, AZ, United States
    • Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Hospital
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • 1999–2006
    • Boston University
      • • Arthritis Center
      • • Department of Radiology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States