Cynthia Aristei

Università degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia, Umbria, Italy

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Publications (93)381.13 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer offers a better quality of life than mastectomy. As 80-85% of breast relapses develop close to the tumour bed, partial breast irradiation was developed to overcome drawbacks with standard radiotherapy. This study compares quality of life and cosmesis after partial breast multi-catheter high-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy or standard radiotherapy. A questionnaire, exploring body image, fear of recurrence, satisfaction with treatment and cosmesis, was administered to 39 partial and 78 whole breast patients at a median of 20 and 80 months after radiotherapy. Patients' and physicians' cosmetic assessments were compared. Groups were well-matched, except for: a higher percentage of chemotherapy-treated patients in the whole breast group and a older median age and a higher percentage of infiltrating ductal carcinoma G1 in partial breast group. At first and second analysis no significant inter-group difference emerged on body image and fear of recurrence, while partial breast patients were more satisfied with cosmetic outcome and at first analysis with treatment. Comparing results from first and second analysis into each treatment group, body image was significantly better at the first analysis in both groups. Fear of recurrence was unchanged. No differences were found in cosmesis as assessed by patients. At first and second analyses physicians' assessment of cosmesis was significantly better in the partial breast group. Even at longer follow-up, quality of life is similar after partial or whole breast irradiation. Cosmesis is better after partial breast irradiation.
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    ABSTRACT: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging detected an isolated adrenal lesion in an elderly man with high-risk prostate cancer who was undergoing radiotherapy (RT) and hormonal therapy (HT). When prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was 31.66 ng/mL, the lesion was not identified as a metastasis by 18F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-choline-PET/CT). When PSA was over 100 ng/mL, 18F-choline-PET/CT diagnosed the malignancy. After adrenalectomy, PSA returned to normal, and stable disease remission was obtained. This case suggests that atypical metastasis may be underdiagnosed.
    Tumori 02/2015; DOI:10.5301/tj.5000260 · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NACT-RT). The study was funded by the Italian National Research Council (CNR).Methods From September 1992 to January 2001, 655 patients with LARC (clinically T3–4, any N) treated with NACT-RT and surgery, were randomized in two arms: follow-up (Arm A) or 6 cycles of ACT with 5 fluorouracil (5FU)-Folinic Acid (Arm B). NACT-RT consisted of 45 Gy/28/ff concurrent with 5FU (350 mg/sqm) and Folinic Acid (20 mg/sqm) on days 1–5 and 29–33; surgery was performed after 4–6 weeks. Median follow up was 63·7 months. Primary end point was overall survival (OS).Results634/655 patients were evaluable (Arm A 310, Arm B 324); 92·5% of Arm A and 91% of Arm B patients received the preoperative treatment as in the protocol; 294 patients of Arm A (94·8%) and 296 of Arm B (91·3%) underwent a radical resection; complete pathologic response and overall downstaging rates did not show any significant difference in the two arms. 83/297 (28%) patients in Arm B, never started ACT. Five year OS and DFS did not show any significant difference in the two treatment arms. Distant metastases occurred in 62 patients (21%) in Arm A and in 58 (19·6%) in Arm B.Conclusions In patients with LARC treated with NACT-RT, the addition of ACT did not improve 5 year OS and DFS and had no impact on the distant metastasis rate.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 11/2014; 113(2). DOI:10.1016/j.radonc.2014.10.006 · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with suspected recurrence of prostate cancer undergoing 18Fluoromethylcholine (18FCH) PET/CT were retrospectively evaluated to investigate the influence of hormonal therapy (HT) in 18FCH uptake.
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Glyoxalase I (GI) is a cellular defence enzyme involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG), a cytotoxic byproduct of glycolysis, and MG-derived advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Argpyrimidine (AP), one of the major AGEs coming from MG modifications of proteins arginines, is a pro-apoptotic agent. Radiotherapy is an important modality widely used in cancer treatment. Exposure of cells to ionising radiation (IR) results in a number of complex biological responses, including apoptosis. The present study was aimed at investigating whether, and through which mechanism, GI was involved in IR-induced apoptosis.Methods:Apoptosis, by TUNEL assay, transcript and protein levels or enzymatic activity, by RT-PCR, western blot and spectrophotometric methods, respectively, were evaluated in irradiated MCF-7 breast cancer cells, also in experiments with appropriate inhibitors or using small interfering RNA.Results:Ionising radiation induced a dramatic reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated inhibition of GI, leading to AP-modified Hsp27 protein accumulation that, in a mechanism involving p53 and NF-κB, triggered an apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Inhibition of GI occurred at both functional and transcriptional levels, the latter occurring via ERK1/2 MAPK and ERα modulation.Conclusions:Glyoxalase I is involved in the IR-induced MCF-7 cell mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via a novel mechanism involving Hsp27, p53 and NF-κB.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 10 June 2014; doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.280 www.bjcancer.com.
    British Journal of Cancer 06/2014; DOI:10.1038/bjc.2014.280 · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13-36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard treatment is fluoropyrimidine alone since alternative agents and regimens have not been shown to be more active, only more toxic. The EURECCA panel summarized available evidence in an attempt to reduce variance in rectal cancer management. This is expected to benefit patients. Results from ongoing randomized trials will help clarify some of the issues that are still under debate.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 11/2013; 110(1). DOI:10.1016/j.radonc.2013.10.024 · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. For the Delphi process, multidisciplinary experts were invited to comment and vote three web-based online voting rounds and to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. This manuscript covers all sentences of the consensus document with the result of the voting. The consensus document represents sections on diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical oncology, radiotherapy, and follow-up where applicable for treatment of colon cancer, rectal cancer and metastatic colorectal disease separately. Moreover, evidence based algorithms for diagnostics and treatment were composed which were also submitted to the Delphi process. The total number of the voted sentences was 465. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the experts. Of the 465 sentences, 84% achieved large consensus, 6% achieved moderate consensus, and 7% resulted in minimum consensus. Only 3% was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. Multidisciplinary consensus on key diagnostic and treatment issues for colon and rectal cancer management using the Delphi method was successful. This consensus document embodies the expertise of professionals from all disciplines involved in the care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms were developed to implement the current evidence and to define core treatment guidance for multidisciplinary team management of colon and rectal cancer throughout Europe.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 10/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.ejca.2013.06.048 · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To evaluate survival outcomes of patients in pStage II-III rectal cancer treated with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based radiochemotherapy and toretrospectively analyzethe impact of prognostic variables on local control, metastasis-free survival and cause-specific survival. A total of 1,338 patients, treated between 1985-2005 for locally advanced rectal cancer, who underwent surgery and postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation, were selected. The actuarial 5- and 10-year outcomes were: local control 87.0%-84.1%, disease-free survival 61.6%-52.1%, metastasis-free survival 72.0%-67.2%, cause-specific survival 70.4%-57.5%, and overall survival 63.8%-53.4%. Better outcomes were observed in patients with IIA, IIIA stage. Multivariate analyses showed that variables significantly affecting metastasis-free survival were pT4 and pN2, while for cancer-specific survival those variables were age >65 years, pT4, pN1, pN2, distal tumors and number of lymph nodes removed ≤12. This study confirmed that among stage II-III rectal cancer patients there are subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes.
    Anticancer research 10/2013; 33(10):4557-4566. · 1.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an alternative to whole-breast irradiation after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. Until the results of randomized phase III studies are available, phase II studies inform about PBI. We report the 5year results of a phase II prospective study with PBI using interstitial multi-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00499057). Hundred patients received PBI (4Gy, twice a day for 4days, until 32Gy). Inclusion criteria were: age ⩾40years, infiltrating carcinoma without lobular histology, ductal in situ carcinoma, tumor size ⩽2.5cm, negative surgical margins and axillary lymph nodes. At a median follow-up of 60months late toxicity occurred in 25 patients; the 5-year probability of freedom from late toxicity was 72.6% (95% CI: 63.7-81.7). Tamoxifen was the only significant risk factor for late toxicity. Cosmetic results, judged by physicians and patients, were good/excellent in 98 patients. Three local relapses (1 true, 2 elsewhere) and 1 regional relapse occurred. The 5-year probability of local or regional relapse-free survival was 97.7% (95% CI: 91.1-99.4) and 99.0% (95% CI: 92.9-99.8), respectively. PBI with interstitial multi-catheter brachytherapy is associated with low relapse and late toxicity rates.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 09/2013; 108(2). DOI:10.1016/j.radonc.2013.08.005 · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a phase I/II trial, patients with locally advanced rectal cancer received preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and gefitinib. Results were promising. To elucidate the molecular and biological effects, we replicated the schedule in the LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line. RT (2 Gy daily for 3 days), 5-FU (0.3, 0.6, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10 μM) and gefitinib (0.2, 0.4, 0.8 μM) were administered alone, in double combinations and all together. We assessed viable cells, cell cycle, cyclin, p53 and p21 expression, signalling pathways by means of phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR), p-AKT and p-ERK 1-2 and clonogenic capacity. RT and 5-FU were cytotoxic. Gefitinib was cytostatic. RT reduced clonogenic capacity more than 5-FU. 5-FU induced more cell death than RT, but surviving cells were proliferative (cyclins and p-EGFR increased). 5-FU + RT had a synergistic effect. Gefitinib, enhancing G1 accumulation, reduced proliferation of cells surviving 5-FU and 5-FU + RT. It slightly increased the cytotoxicity of RT and 5-FU. As gefitinib limited the proliferation rate of cells surviving 5-FU and 5-FU + RT in the LoVo cell line, it may be a useful addition to chemotherapy and RT in rectal cancer patients.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 08/2013; 29(1). DOI:10.1007/s00384-013-1754-1 · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last twenty years however still considerable variation exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of cancer care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012 the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about colon and rectum was held looking for multidisciplinary consensus. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. METHODS: The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Experts commented and voted on the two web-based online voting rounds before the meeting (between 4th and 25th October and between the 20th November and 3rd December 2012) as well as one online round after the meeting (4th-20th March 2013) and were invited to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. All sentences that were voted on are available on the EURECCA website www.canceraudit.eu. The consensus document was divided in sections describing evidence based algorithms of diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical oncology, radiotherapy, and follow-up where applicable for treatment of colon cancer, rectal cancer and stage IV separately. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. RESULTS: The total number of the voted sentences was 465. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the experts. Of the 465 sentences, 84% achieved large consensus, 6% achieved moderate consensus, and 7% resulted in minimum consensus. Only 3% was disagreed by more than 50% of the members. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to achieve European Consensus on key diagnostic and treatment issues using the Delphi method. This consensus embodies the expertise of professionals from all disciplines involved in the care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. Diagnostic and treatment algorithms were developed to implement the current evidence and to define core treatment guidance for multidisciplinary team management of colon and rectal cancer throughout Europe.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 06/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.ejca.2013.04.032 · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine whether parameters related to TBI impacted upon OS and relapse in patients with acute leukemia in CR who underwent haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) in 11 Italian Radiation Oncology Centres. Data were analysed from 507 patients (313 males; 194 females; median age 15 years; 318 with ALL; 188 with AML; 1 case not recorded). Besides 128 autologous transplants, donors included 192 matched siblings, 74 mismatched family members and 113 unrelated individuals. Autologous and allogeneic transplants were analysed separately. Median follow-up was 40.1 months. TBI schedules and HSCT type were closely related. Uni- and multi-variate analyses showed no parameter was significant for OS or relapse in autologous transplantation. Multivariate analysis showed type of transplant and disease impacted significantly on OS in allogeneic transplantation. Disease, GVHD and TBI dose were risk factors for relapse. This analysis illustrates that Italian Transplant Centre use of TBI is in line with international practice. Most Centres adopted a hyperfractionated schedule that is used worldwide (12 Gy in six fractions over 3 days), which appears to have become standard. TBI doses impacted significantly upon relapse rates.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 27 May 2013; doi:10.1038/bmt.2013.66.
    Bone marrow transplantation 05/2013; 48(7). DOI:10.1038/bmt.2013.66 · 3.47 Impact Factor
  • Value in Health 05/2013; 16(3):A155. DOI:10.1016/j.jval.2013.03.768 · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has increased markedly in recent decades. In the past, mastectomy was the primary treatment for patients with DCIS, but as with invasive cancer, breast-conserving surgery followed by radiation therapy (RT) has become the standard approach. We present the final results of a multi-institutional retrospective study of an Italian Radiation Oncology Group for the study of conservative treatment of DCIS, characterized by a very long period of accrual, from February 1985 to March 2000, and a median follow-up longer than 11 years. Methods A collaborative multi-institutional study was conducted in Italy in 10 Radiation Oncology Departments. A consecutive series of 586 women with DCIS histologically confirmed, treated between February 1985 and March 2000, was retrospectively evaluated. Median age at diagnosis was 55 years (range: 29–84); 32 patients were 40 years old or younger. All women underwent conservative surgery followed by whole breast RT. Irradiation was delivered to the entire breast, for a median total dose of 50 Gy; the tumour bed was boosted in 295 cases (50%) at a median dose of 10 Gy. Results After a median follow-up of 136 months (range: 16–292 months), 59/586 patients (10%) experienced a local recurrence: invasive in 37 cases, intraductal in 20 and not specified in two. Salvage mastectomy was the treatment of choice in 46 recurrent patients; conservative surgery in 10 and it was unknown in three patients. The incidence of local recurrence was significantly higher in women younger than 40 years (31.3%) (p= 0.0009). Five patients developed distant metastases. Furthermore 40 patients developed a contralateral breast cancer and 31 a second primary tumour in a different site. The 10-year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 95.5% and the 10-year actuarial disease-specific survival (DSS) was 99%. Conclusions Our results are consistent with those reported in the literature. In particular it has been defined the importance of young age (40 years or less) as a relevant risk factor for local recurrence. This retrospective multi-institutional Italian study confirms the long term efficacy of breast conserving surgery with RT in women with DCIS.
    Radiation Oncology 10/2012; 7(1):177. DOI:10.1186/1748-717X-7-177 · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values ≥10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 05/2012; 84(3):e299-304. DOI:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2012.04.002 · 4.18 Impact Factor
  • Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2011; 99. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8140(11)71492-X · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2011; 99. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8140(11)71182-3 · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2011; 99. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8140(11)71500-6 · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2011; 99. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8140(11)71011-8 · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2011; 99. DOI:10.1016/S0167-8140(11)70884-2 · 4.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
381.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1989–2014
    • Università degli Studi di Perugia
      • Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
      Perugia, Umbria, Italy
  • 2013
    • Università degli Studi G. d'Annunzio Chieti e Pescara
      Chieta, Abruzzo, Italy
    • Azienda Ospedaliera Santa Maria della Misericordia
      Udine, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      • Department of Surgery
      Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2011
    • Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde de Coimbra
      Coímbra, Coimbra, Portugal
  • 2008
    • Azienda Ospedaliera di Perugia
      Perugia, Umbria, Italy
  • 1999
    • Santa Chiara Hospital
      Trient, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy