Manuel Ramos-Casals

IDIBAPS August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (225)1019.27 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the etiopathogenic role of genetic polymorphisms and serum levels of surfactant protein-D (SP-D) in primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS).
    The Journal of rheumatology. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: IgG4-RD (IgG4-RD) is an emerging immune-mediated disease with the capability of involving essentially any organ. The epidemiology of this disease has not been explored in detail. A majority of patients reported in the literature to date are from Japan, but the condition has been described all across the world and there is no strong evidence to suggest a predilection for Asian populations. The mean age at diagnosis is approximately 60years and there is a decided male predominance for many clinical features, with an overall male: female ratio of 8:3. A cardinal feature of IgG4-RD is single or multiple organ swelling that often raises concern for malignancy. IgG4-RD should be suspected in patients presenting with unexplained enlargement or swelling of one or more organs. Presenting features vary substantially according to the specialty to which patients present first; in addition, the disease can be diagnosed unexpectedly in pathological specimens or identified incidentally on radiology studies. Involvement of major organs is common and IgG4-RD may lead to organ failure, particularly in the pancreas, liver and biliary tree, kidneys, thyroid gland, lungs, and aorta. The diagnosis of IgG4-RD relies on the coexistence of various clinical, laboratory and histopathological findings, although none is pathognomonic by itself.
    Autoimmunity reviews. 08/2014;
  • Pilar Brito-Zerón, Manuel Ramos-Casals
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    ABSTRACT: Primary Sjögren syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease whose clinical spectrum extends from sicca syndrome to systemic involvement (extraglandular manifestations). Recent reports have focused on expanding the clinical characterization and improving the diagnostic and therapeutic management of systemic Sjögren.
    Current opinion in rheumatology. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to validate the classification criteria for cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV). METHODS: Twenty-three centres were involved. New patients with CV (group A) and controls, i.e. subjects with serum cryoglobulins but lacking CV based on the gold standard of clinical judgment (group B) and subjects without cryoglobulins but with clinical features that can be observed in the course of CV (group C), were studied. Positivity of serum cryoglobulins was necessary for CV classification. Sensitivity and specificity of the criteria were calculated by comparing group A vs group B. The group A vs group C comparison was done to demonstrate the possible diagnostic utility of the criteria. RESULTS: The study included 268 patients in group A, 182 controls in group B and 193 controls in group C (small vessel vasculitis, 51.8%). The questionnaire (at least 2/3 positive answers) showed 89.0% sensitivity and 93.4% specificity; the clinical item (at least 3/4 clinical involvement) showed 75.7% sensitivity and 89.0% specificity and the laboratory item (at least 2/3 laboratory data) showed 80.2% sensitivity and 62.4% specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of the classification criteria (at least 2/3 positive items) were 89.9% and 93.5%, respectively. The comparison of group A with group C demonstrated the clinical utility of the criteria in differentiating CV from CV mimickers. CONCLUSION: Classification criteria for CV were validated in a second, large, international study confirming good sensitivity and specificity in a complex systemic disease.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 07/2014; · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate health-related quality of life in a large series of primary SS patients using the recently-proposed ESSPRI questionnaire and to evaluate the relationship between the intensity of oral dryness and other signs and symptoms frequently found in these patients. Methods: We evaluated 90 primary SS patients seen consecutively; all fulfilled the current classification criteria. All patients completed the ESSPRI questionnaire. We compared the mean values of the ESSPRI-dry mouth item with other ESSPRI items related to sicca features, general symptoms, quality of life, quality of sleep, psychological and psychiatric features, extraglandular involvement, laboratory features and immunological markers and cardiovascular risk factors. Multivariate regression analysis with a backwards stepwise selection method was performed to identify those variables that were independently associated with dry mouth. Results: Mean intensity of oral dryness measured by the corresponding ESSPRI item was 7.17 ± 0.23. Oral dryness correlated with age both at diagnosis and at study inclusion (p=0.013), but not with gender or with time of disease evolution. No significant correlation was found with the SF-36, HAQ and FIQ questionnaires. We found a significant correlation between the intensity of oral dryness and the quality of sleep (p=0.001), anxiety and depression measured by the GH28 (p=0.004 and 0.024, respectively), and a statistically-significant trend for anxiety and depression measured by the HADS (p=0.08 and 0.07, respectively). No significant correlation was found with the main extraglandular and immunological features; however, a significant correlation between oral dryness and hypertension (p=0.019), type II diabetes mellitus (p=0.005) and hypercholesterolemia (p=0.011) was found. Multivariate regression analysis shows that fatigue measured by ESSPRI (p=0.049), sleep quality (p=0.008) and hypercholesterolemia (p=0.008) were independently associated with dry mouth. Conclusion: We report on the usefulness of the ESSPRI index in evaluating HRQOL associated with oral dryness in primary SS patients. Oral dryness correlated with age and the other sicca symptoms measured by ESSPRI, but not with the main systemic and immunological SS features. In contrast, oral dryness was strongly correlated with fatigue, pain, psychological distress, poor sleep and vascular risk factors. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach may be the best way of minimizing oral dryness and its consequences in primary SS patients.
    Oral health and dental management. 06/2014; 13(2):402-7.
  • Soledad Retamozo, Pilar Brito-Zerón, Manuel Ramos-Casals
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    ABSTRACT: Cryoglobulinemia is a heterogeneous systemic autoimmune disease with a wide variety of causes, symptoms and outcomes, and different etiopathogenic pathways involved in the vasculitic organ damage. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 changed radically the focus of research of the so-called «essential» cryoglobulinemia. Cryoglobulins can be detected in 25-30% of patients with HCV, overwhelmingly representing mixed cryoglobulins. However, only 10-15% of patients present with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, with a broad spectrum of symptoms including mild or life-threatening manifestations. Consequently, not all patients can be uniformly treated. The key therapeutic points in HCV+ patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis cover different aspects. The first is to treat the underlying cause of cryoglobulinemia whenever possible, hence the use of antiviral therapies must always be considered in these patients. An individualized diagnostic approach to assess the number of organs involved and the severity of organ involvement is also essential in the therapeutic planning. This complex clinical scenario leads to an equally complex therapeutic scenario. There are three main treatment strategies for HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: conventional immunosuppression, antiviral treatment and biological therapies. The most recent studies are suggesting a change from the classical therapeutic approach (monotherapeutic regimens) to combination/sequential regimens, including treatments targeting the virus and those directed against the induced autoimmune disease, with the aim of blocking the various etiopathogenic pathways involved.
    Medicina Clínica 04/2014; · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the frequency of each American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criterion met at time of enrollment, and the increase in each of the criteria over 5 years. In 2000 the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) recruited an international inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; ≥ 4 ACR criteria) who were followed at yearly intervals according to a standard protocol. Descriptive statistics were used to assess the total and cumulative number of ACR criteria met at each visit. Regression models were done to compare the increase of individual and cumulative criteria as a function of race/ethnicity group, and sex. In all, 768 patients have been followed for a minimum of 5 years. Overall, 59.1% of the patients had an increase in the number of ACR criteria they met over the 5-year period. The mean number of ACR criteria met at enrollment was 5.04 ± 1.13 and at year 5 was 6.03 ± 1.42. At enrollment, nonwhite patients had a higher number of ACR criteria (5.19 ± 1.23) than white patients. The total number of criteria increased in both white and nonwhite ethnicities, but increased more among whites. Males had a slightly lower number of criteria at enrollment compared to females and males accrued fewer criteria at 5 years. In this international inception cohort of SLE patients with at least 4 ACR criteria at entry, there was an accumulation of ACR criteria over the following 5 years. The distribution of criteria both at inception and over 5 years is affected by sex and ethnicity.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 04/2014; · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We examined the association between MetS and disease activity, disease phenotype and corticosteroid exposure over time in patients with SLE. Recently diagnosed (<15 months) patients with SLE from 30 centres across 11 countries were enrolled into the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Inception Cohort from 2000 onwards. Baseline and annual assessments recorded clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data. A longitudinal analysis of factors associated with MetS in the first 2 years of follow-up was performed using random effects logistic regression. We studied 1150 patients with a mean (SD) age of 34.9 (13.6) years and disease duration at enrolment of 24.2 (18.0) weeks. In those with complete data, MetS prevalence was 38.2% at enrolment, 34.8% at year 1 and 35.4% at year 2. In a multivariable random effects model that included data from all visits, prior MetS status, baseline renal disease, SLICC Damage Index >1, higher disease activity, increasing age and Hispanic or Black African race/ethnicity were independently associated with MetS over the first 2 years of follow-up in the cohort. MetS is a persistent phenotype in a significant proportion of patients with SLE. Renal lupus, active inflammatory disease and damage are SLE-related factors that drive MetS development while antimalarial agents appear to be protective from early in the disease course.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 04/2014; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. To evaluate systemic involvement in primary SS in a large cohort of Spanish patients using the EULAR-SS disease activity index (ESSDAI) definitions.Methods. Systemic involvement was characterized using ESSDAI definitions for the 10 clinical domains (constitutional, lymphadenopathy, glandular, articular, cutaneous, pulmonary, renal, peripheral nervous system, central nervous system and muscular). ESSDAI scores at diagnosis, during follow-up and cumulated at the last visit were calculated.Results. The cohort consisted of 921 patients. After a mean follow-up of 75 months, 77 (8%) patients still had an ESSDAI score of zero at the last visit. Organ by organ, the percentage of patients who developed activity during the follow-up (ESSDAI score ≥ 1 at any time) ranged between 1.4% and 56%, with articular, pulmonary and peripheral neurological involvement being the most common. Logistic multivariate regression analysis showed the following features at diagnosis and had the closest association with
    Rheumatology. 02/2014; 53(2):321-331.
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    ABSTRACT: To validate the two recently developed disease activity indexes for assessment of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) SS Patient Reported Index (ESSPRI) and the EULAR SS Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). A prospective international 6-month duration validation study was conducted in 15 countries. At each visit, physicians completed ESSDAI, SS disease activity index (SSDAI), Sjögren's Systemic Clinical Activity Index (SCAI) and physician global assessment (PhGA); and patients completed ESSPRI, Sicca Symptoms Inventory (SSI), Profile of Fatigue and Discomfort (PROFAD) and patient global assessment (PGA). Psychometric properties (construct validity, responsiveness and reliability) were evaluated and compared between scores. Of the 395 patients included, 145 (37%) and 251 (64%) had currently active or current or past systemic manifestations, respectively. EULAR scores had higher correlation with the gold standard than other scores (ESSDAI with PhGA: r=0.59; ESSRPI with PGA: r=0.70). Correlations between patient and systemic scores were very low (ranging from 0.07 to 0.29). All systemic scores had similar large responsiveness in improved patients. Responsiveness of patient scores was low but was significantly higher for ESSPRI compared with SSI and PROFAD. Reliability was very good for all scores. ESSDAI and ESSPRI had good construct validity. All scores were reliable. Systemic scores had a large sensitivity to change in patients whose disease activity improves. Patient scores had a small sensitivity to change, however, significantly better for ESSPRI. Systemic and patient scores poorly correlated, suggesting that they are 2 complementary components that should be both evaluated, but separately.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 01/2014; · 9.11 Impact Factor
  • Soledad Retamozo, Pilar Brito-Zerón, Manuel Ramos-Casals
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    ABSTRACT: Cryoglobulinemia is a heterogeneous systemic autoimmune disease with a wide variety of causes, symptoms and outcomes, and different etiopathogenic pathways involved in the vasculitic organ damage. The discovery of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 1989 changed radically the focus of research of the so-called «essential» cryoglobulinemia. Cryoglobulins can be detected in 25-30% of patients with HCV, overwhelmingly representing mixed cryoglobulins. However, only 10-15% of patients present with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, with a broad spectrum of symptoms including mild or life-threatening manifestations. Consequently, not all patients can be uniformly treated. The key therapeutic points in HCV+ patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis cover different aspects. The first is to treat the underlying cause of cryoglobulinemia whenever possible, hence the use of antiviral therapies must always be considered in these patients. An individualized diagnostic approach to assess the number of organs involved and the severity of organ involvement is also essential in the therapeutic planning. This complex clinical scenario leads to an equally complex therapeutic scenario. There are three main treatment strategies for HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: conventional immunosuppression, antiviral treatment and biological therapies. The most recent studies are suggesting a change from the classical therapeutic approach (monotherapeutic regimens) to combination/sequential regimens, including treatments targeting the virus and those directed against the induced autoimmune disease, with the aim of blocking the various etiopathogenic pathways involved.
    Medicina Clínica. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The objective of this paper is to evaluate the prevalence and characterize the main epidemiological, clinical and immunological features of annular erythema (AE) in non-Asian patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS).Methods We carried out a retrospective study searching for AE in 377 Spanish patients with primary SS fulfilling the 2002 American-European criteria. In addition, we searched PubMed (1994-2012) using the MeSH terms "annular erythema" and "primary Sjögren's syndrome" for additional cases. All cases with AE reported in patients with SS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus were excluded.ResultsIn our Spanish cohort, we found 35 (9%) patients diagnosed with AE. All were white females, with a mean age of 47 years at diagnosis of AE. AE preceded diagnosis of SS in 27 (77%) patients. Cutaneous AE lesions involved principally the face and upper extremities. All patients reported photosensitivity, with cutaneous flares being reported during the warmest months in 93% of patients. Immunological markers consisted of anti-Ro/La antibodies in 31 (89%) patients. In the literature search, we identified eight additional non-Asian patients with primary SS diagnosed with AE. In comparison with 52 Asian patients, the 43 non-Asian patients with AE related to primary SS were more frequently women (100% vs 78%, p = 0.008), and cutaneous lesions were less frequently reported in the face (55% vs 81%, p = 0.045) and more frequently in the neck (40% vs 14%, p = 0.041). Immunologically, non-Asian patients had a lower frequency of anti-Ro antibodies and a higher frequency of negative Ro/La antibodies, although the differences were not statistically significant.ConclusionAE is not an exclusive cutaneous feature of Asian patients with primary SS. In addition to the characteristic cutaneous expression, AE has a very specific clinical and immunological profile: often presenting before the fulfillment of SS criteria, overwhelmingly associated with anti-Ro antibodies but weakly associated with other immunological markers and the main systemic SS-related features.
    Lupus 12/2013; · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Haemophagocytic syndromes (haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis) have a wide range of causes, symptoms, and outcomes, but all lead to a hyperinflammatory response and organ damage-mainly reported in paediatric patients, but reports of adult presentation are increasing. Analysis of the genetic and molecular pathophysiology of these syndromes have improved the understanding of the crosstalk between lymphocytes and histiocytes and their regulatoty mechanisms. Clinical presentations with a broad differential diagnosis, and often life-threatening outcome, complicate the management, which might include supportive intensive care, immunosuppressive and biological treatments, or haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. Insufficient knowledge of these syndromes could contribute to poor prognosis. Early diagnosis is essential to initiate appropriate treatment and improve the quality of life and survival of patients with this challenging disorder.
    The Lancet 11/2013; · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the frequency and characteristics of headaches and their association with global disease activity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A disease inception cohort was assessed annually for headache (5 types) and 18 other neuropsychiatric (NP) events. Global disease activity scores (SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 [SLEDAI-2K]), damage scores (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI]), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) mental and physical component summary scores were collected. Time to first headache and associations with SF-36 scores were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards and linear regression models with generalized estimating equations. Among the 1,732 SLE patients enrolled, 89.3% were female and 48.3% were white. The mean ± SD age was 34.6 ± 13.4 years, duration of disease was 5.6 ± 5.2 months, and length of followup was 3.8 ± 3.1 years. At enrollment, 17.8% of patients had headache (migraine [60.7%], tension [38.6%], intractable nonspecific [7.1%], cluster [2.6%], and intracranial hypertension [1.0%]). The prevalence of headache increased to 58% after 10 years. Only 1.5% of patients had lupus headache, as identified in the SLEDAI-2K. In addition, headache was associated with other NP events attributed to either SLE or non-SLE causes. There was no association of headache with SLEDAI-2K scores (without the lupus headache variable), SDI scores, use of corticosteroids, use of antimalarials, use of immunosuppressive medications, or specific autoantibodies. SF-36 mental component scores were lower in patients with headache compared with those without headache (mean ± SD 42.5 ± 12.2 versus 47.8 ± 11.3; P < 0.001), and similar differences in physical component scores were seen (38.0 ± 11.0 in those with headache versus 42.6 ± 11.4 in those without headache; P < 0.001). In 56.1% of patients, the headaches resolved over followup. Headache is frequent in SLE, but overall, it is not associated with global disease activity or specific autoantibodies. Although headaches are associated with a lower HRQOL, the majority of headaches resolve over time, independent of lupus-specific therapies.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 11/2013; 65(11):2887-97. · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: "Cryoglobulinemia" refers to the presence of cryoglobulins (immunoglobulins that precipitate at variable temperatures < 37 degrees C [98.6 degrees F]) in serum. Monoclonal cryoglobulinemia (type I) involves a single type of monoclonal immunoglobulin, while mixed cryoglobulinemia involves a mixture either of polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G and monoclonal IgM (type II), or of polyclonal IgG and polyclonal IgM (type Ill); both monoclonal and polyclonal IgM have rheumatoid factor activity. Cryoglobulinemia is a unique model of human disease for several reasons: (1) cryoglobulins are detected using a simple technical approach that is based on in vitro laboratory observation of cold precipitation in serum; (2) cryoglobulinemic organ damage may be produced by two different etiopathogenic mechanisms (accumulation of cryoglobulins and autoimmune-mediated vasculitic damage); and (3) cryoglobulinemia is associated with a wide range of etiologies, symptoms, and outcomes, and is considered a disease that combines elements of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative diseases. There are three main broad treatment strategies in cryoglobulinemia-conventional immunosuppression, antiviral treatment, and biologic therapy. Some agents, such as corticosteroids and rituximab, have been successfully used in all types of cryoglobulinemia; however, treatment should be modulated according to the underlying associated disease (chronic viral infections, autoimmune diseases, or cancer), the predominant etiopathogenic damage (vasculitis vs. hyperviscosity), and the severity of internal organ involvement.
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 11/2013; 27(11):1098-1105, 1110-6. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cryoglobulinemia is characterized by a wide range of causes, symptoms, and outcomes. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is detected in 30%-100% of patients with cryoglobulins. Although more than half the patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis present a relatively benign clinical course, some may present with potentially life-threatening situations. We conducted the current study to analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of HCV patients presenting with life-threatening cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. We evaluated 181 admissions from 89 HCV patients diagnosed with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis consecutively admitted to our department between 1995 and 2010. In addition, we performed a systematic analysis of cases reported to date through a MEDLINE search.The following organ involvements were considered to be potentially life-threatening in HCV patients with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis: cryoglobulinemic, biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis presenting with renal failure; gastrointestinal vasculitis; pulmonary hemorrhage; central nervous system (CNS) involvement; and myocardial involvement. A total of 279 patients (30 from our department and 249 from the literature search) fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 205 presented with renal failure, 45 with gastrointestinal vasculitis, 38 with CNS involvement, 18 with pulmonary hemorrhage, and 3 with myocardial involvement; 30 patients presented with more than 1 life-threatening cryoglobulinemic manifestation. There were 146 (52%) women and 133 (48%) men, with a mean age at diagnosis of cryoglobulinemia of 54 years (range, 25-87 yr) and a mean age at life-threatening involvement of 55 years (range, 25-87 yr). In 232 (83%) patients, life-threatening involvement was the first clinical manifestation of cryoglobulinemia. Severe involvement appeared a mean of 1.2 years (range, 1-11 yr) after the diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Patients were followed for a mean of 14 months (range, 3-120 mo) after the diagnosis of life-threatening cryoglobulinemia. Sixty-three patients (22%) died. The main cause of death was sepsis (42%) in patients with glomerulonephritis, and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis itself in patients with gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and CNS involvement (60%, 57%, and 62%, respectively). In conclusion, HCV-related cryoglobulinemia may result in progressive (renal involvement) or acute (pulmonary hemorrhage, gastrointestinal ischemia, CNS involvement) life-threatening organ damage. The mortality rate of these manifestations ranges between 20% and 80%. Unfortunately, this may be the first cryoglobulinemic involvement in almost two-thirds of cases, highlighting the complex management and very elevated mortality of these cases.
    Medicine 08/2013; · 4.35 Impact Factor
  • Autoimmunity reviews 03/2013; · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Primary Sjögren syndrome (SS) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by sicca features and systemic manifestations, and requires a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Areas covered: Treatment of sicca manifestations is symptomatic and is based on the administration of topical therapies (saliva substitutes and preservative-free artificial tears). In severe cases of keratoconjunctivitis sicca, topical cyclosporine A may be used. For patients with residual salivary gland function, stimulation of salivary flow with a sialogogue (pilocarpine or cevimeline) is the treatment of choice. The management of extraglandular features must be tailored to the specific organ(s) involved. Hydroxychloroquine may be appropriate for patients with fatigue, arthralgia and myalgia, while glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents should be reserved for severe systemic involvement (although no controlled trials in primary SS guide their use). RCTs have demonstrated the lack of efficacy of antitumor necrosis factor agents and promising results for B-cell depleting agents. Expert opinion: The overall low level of evidence in therapeutic studies in primary SS suggests that much larger trials of the most promising therapies are necessary. The use of drugs targeting molecules and receptors involved in the etiopathogenesis of primary SS may open up a new era in the therapeutic management of the disease, but the potential risks and benefits of these agents must be weighed carefully.
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 01/2013; · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biological therapies are based on the administration of various types of synthetic molecules related to the immune response. Their use has spread in recent years to the field of systemic autoimmune diseases, particularly to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Until 2011, these diseases were not included in the therapeutic indications approved by international regulatory agencies. Therefore, the use of biological therapies was restricted to clinical trials and to compassionate use for cases refractory to standard treatments (off-label use), which require the approval of the Health Ministry. In 2011, belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to the soluble form of the protein human B lymphocyte stimulator BlyS, was approved for use in patients with SLE. Because the clinical information on the use of this new drug in patients with SLE has only been obtained from the results of randomized trials, the Study Group of Autoimmune Diseases (GEAS) of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has developed therapeutic guidelines. These guidelines are based on the current scientific evidence on the use of belimumab in SLE patients in the clinical practice.
    Revista Clínica Española 01/2013; 213(1):42–58. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new approach for the classification of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS) has been recently proposed. Although these new criteria substantially differ from the American European Consensus Group criteria, which have represented the gold standard for the last decade, when compared with each other the two sets show a high statistical degree of agreement. However, the fact that two different criteria to classify patient with SS could be available may introduce some additional difficulties in the scientific communication, making cohorts of patients selected by using different methods less than completely equivalent, and the results of epidemiological studies and therapeutic trials not entirely comparable. Consequently, to reach a consensus agreement on universally accepted classification criteria for SS seems to be a very desirable objective.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 12/2012; · 8.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
1,019.27 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2014
    • IDIBAPS August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2013
    • Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1998–2013
    • Hospital Clínic de Barcelona
      • Servicio de Enfermedades Autoinmunes y Sistémicas
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2011–2012
    • Hospital do Meixoeiro
      Vigo, Galicia, Spain
  • 1998–2012
    • University of Barcelona
      • Departament de Medicina
      Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2009
    • Universidad del País Vasco / Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
      Leioa, Basque Country, Spain
  • 2005
    • Southern Medical Clinic
      San Fernando, City of San Fernando, Trinidad and Tobago
  • 2002
    • Hospital Egas Moniz
      Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
  • 2001
    • University of Cape Town
      • Department of Medicine
      Cape Town, Province of the Western Cape, South Africa