Lynette A Fouser

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

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Publications (24)255.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Intestinal homeostasis requires a complex balance of interactions between diverse resident microbial communities, the intestinal epithelium, and the underlying immune system. We show that the Lyn tyrosine kinase, a critical regulator of immune cell function and pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) responses, has a key role in controlling gastrointestinal inflammation. Lyn(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, whereas Lyn gain-of-function (Lyn(up)) mice exhibited attenuated colitis during acute and chronic models of disease. Lyn(up) mice were hypersensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), driving enhanced production of cytokines and factors associated with intestinal barrier function, including interleukin (IL)-22. Oral administration of LPS was sufficient to protect antibiotic-treated Lyn(up) but not wild-type mice from DSS, highlighting how Lyn-dependent changes in the nature/magnitude of PRR responses can impact intestinal health. Furthermore, protection from DSS-induced colitis and increased IL-22 production in response to LPS did not depend on the adaptive immune system, with increased innate lymphoid cell-derived IL-22 correlating with Lyn activity in dendritic cells. These data reveal a key role for Lyn in the regulation of innate immune responses and control of intestinal inflammation.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 18 September 2013; doi:10.1038/mi.2013.60.
    Mucosal Immunology 09/2013; · 7.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background In Type 1 diabetes, the insulin-producing β-cells within the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are destroyed. We showed previously that immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can prevent disease process and pancreatic β-cell loss. This was associated with increased islet Regenerating (Reg) genes expression, and elevated IL-22-producing Th17 T-cells in the pancreas. Results We hypothesized that IL-22 was responsible for the increased Reg gene expression in the pancreas. We therefore quantified the Reg1, Reg2, and Reg3δ (INGAP) mRNA expression in isolated pre-diabetic NOD islets treated with IL-22. We measured IL-22, and IL-22 receptor(R)-α mRNA expression in the pancreas and spleen of pre-diabetic and diabetic NOD mice. Our results showed: 1) Reg1 and Reg2 mRNA abundance to be significantly increased in IL-22-treated islets in vitro; 2) IL-22 mRNA expression in the pre-diabetic mouse pancreas increased with time following CFA treatment; 3) a reduced expression of IL-22Rα following CFA treatment; 4) a down-regulation in Reg1 and Reg2 mRNA expression in the pancreas of pre-diabetic mice injected with an IL-22 neutralizing antibody following CFA adjuvant therapy; and 5) an increased islet β- cell DNA synthesis in vitro in the presence of IL-22. Conclusions We conclude that IL-22 may contribute to the regeneration of β-cells by up-regulating Regenerating Reg1 and Reg2 genes in the islets.
    Cell Regeneration. 04/2013; 2(2):1-11.
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial-induced intestinal inflammation is crucially dependent on interleukin (IL)-23 and is associated with CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 responses. However, the relative contributions of these subsets during the induction and resolution of colitis in T-cell-sufficient hosts remain unknown. We report that Helicobacter hepaticus-induced typhlocolitis in specific pathogen-free IL-10-/- mice is associated with elevated frequencies and numbers of large intestinal interferon (IFN)-γ+ and IFN-γ+IL-17A+ CD4+ T cells. By assessing histone modifications and transcript levels in IFN-γ+, IFN-γ+IL-17A+, and IL-17A+ CD4+ T cells isolated from the inflamed intestine, we show that Th17 cells are predisposed to upregulate the Th1 program and that they express IL-23R but not IL-12R. Using IL-17A fate-reporter mice, we further demonstrate that H. hepaticus infection gives rise to Th17 cells that extinguish IL-17A secretion and turn on IFN-γ within 10 days post bacterial inoculation. Together, our results suggest that bacterial-induced Th17 cells arising in disease-susceptible hosts contribute to intestinal pathology by switching phenotype, transitioning via an IFN-γ+IL-17A+ stage, to become IFN-γ+ ex-Th17 cells.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 6 March 2013; doi:10.1038/mi.2013.11.
    Mucosal Immunology 03/2013; · 7.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is central to host protection against bacterial infections at barrier sites. Both innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and T cells produce IL-22. However, the specific contributions of CD4(+) T cells and their developmental origins are unclear. We found that the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium induced sequential waves of IL-22-producing ILCs and CD4(+) T cells that were each critical to host defense during a primary infection. Whereas IL-22 production by ILCs was strictly IL-23 dependent, development of IL-22-producing CD4(+) T cells occurred via an IL-6-dependent mechanism that was augmented by, but not dependent on, IL-23 and was dependent on both transcription factors T-bet and AhR. Transfer of CD4(+) T cells differentiated with IL-6 in the absence of TGF-β ("Th22" cells) conferred complete protection of infected IL-22-deficient mice whereas transferred Th17 cells did not. These findings establish Th22 cells as an important component of mucosal antimicrobial host defense.
    Immunity 11/2012; · 19.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent discovery of a new CD4(+) T cell subset, Th17, has transformed our understanding of the pathogenetic basis of an increasing number of chronic immune-mediated diseases. Particularly in tissues that interface with the microbial environment-such as the intestinal and respiratory tracts and the skin-where most of the Th17 cells in the body reside, dysregulated immunity to self (or the extended self, the diverse microbiota that normally colonize these tissues) can result in chronic inflammatory disease. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the biology of the Th17 pathway and on genome-wide association studies that implicate this immune pathway in human disease involving these tissues. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease Volume 8 is January 24, 2013. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.
    Annual Review of Pathology Mechanisms of Disease 11/2012; · 25.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known about the maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and progenitors during immune-mediated tissue damage or about the susceptibility of transplant recipients to tissue damage mediated by the donor immune system during graft versus host disease (GVHD). We demonstrate here that deficiency of recipient-derived IL-22 increased acute GVHD tissue damage and mortality, that ISCs were eliminated during GVHD, and that ISCs as well as their downstream progenitors expressed the IL-22 receptor. Intestinal IL-22 was produced after bone marrow transplant by IL-23-responsive innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) from the transplant recipients, and intestinal IL-22 increased in response to pretransplant conditioning. However, ILC frequency and IL-22 amounts were decreased by GVHD. Recipient IL-22 deficiency led to increased crypt apoptosis, depletion of ISCs, and loss of epithelial integrity. Our findings reveal IL-22 as a critical regulator of tissue sensitivity to GVHD and a protective factor for ISCs during inflammatory intestinal damage.
    Immunity 08/2012; 37(2):339-50. · 19.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian intestinal tract is colonized by trillions of beneficial commensal bacteria that are anatomically restricted to specific niches. However, the mechanisms that regulate anatomical containment remain unclear. Here, we show that interleukin-22 (IL-22)-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are present in intestinal tissues of healthy mammals. Depletion of ILCs resulted in peripheral dissemination of commensal bacteria and systemic inflammation, which was prevented by administration of IL-22. Disseminating bacteria were identified as Alcaligenes species originating from host lymphoid tissues. Alcaligenes was sufficient to promote systemic inflammation after ILC depletion in mice, and Alcaligenes-specific systemic immune responses were associated with Crohn's disease and progressive hepatitis C virus infection in patients. Collectively, these data indicate that ILCs regulate selective containment of lymphoid-resident bacteria to prevent systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases.
    Science 06/2012; 336(6086):1321-5. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common chronic autoimmune skin disease of unknown cause that involves dysregulated interplay between immune cells and keratinocytes. IL-22 is a cytokine produced by the TH1, TH17, and TH22 subsets that are functionally implicated in the psoriatic pathology. We assessed the role of IL-22 in a mouse model where psoriasiform skin inflammation is triggered by topical application of the TLR7/8 agonist imiquimod. At the macroscopic level, scaly skin lesions induced by daily applications of imiquimod in wild-type mice were almost totally absent in IL-22-deficient mice or in mice treated with a blocking anti-IL-22 Ab. At the microscopic level, IL-22-deficient mice showed a dramatic decrease in the development of pustules and a partial decrease in acanthosis. At the molecular level, the absence or inhibition of IL-22 strongly decreased the expression of chemotactic factors such as CCL3 and CXCL3 and of biomarkers such as S100A8, S100A7, and keratin 14, which reflect the antimicrobial and hyperproliferative responses of keratinocytes. IL-22 also played a major role in neutrophil infiltration after imiquimod treatment. IL-23 was required for IL-22 production, and γδ TCR lymphocytes represented the major source of IL-22 in lymph nodes from imiquimod-treated mice. However, T cells were not absolutely required for IL-22 production because imiquimod-induced IL-22 expression in the skin is still preserved in Rag2(-/-) mice. Taken together, our data show that IL-22 is required for psoriasis-like lesions in the mouse imiquimod model and is produced by both T cells and innate immune cells.
    The Journal of Immunology 11/2011; 188(1):462-9. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Cytokine 10/2011; 56(1):75-75. · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence indicates that IL-1 family members and Th17 cytokines have a pathogenic role in psoriasis. We investigated the regulatory interactions of the IL-1-like IL-36 cytokine family and the Th17 cytokines in the context of skin inflammation. We observed increased gene expression of all three IL-36 cytokines in a Th17-dominant psoriasis-like animal model. The induction was downregulated by neutralizing IL-22. Expression of the IL-36s was also induced in cultured primary human keratinocytes (KC) by IL-17A and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-22 synergized with IL-17A and TNF-α. Furthermore, the IL-36s directly induced their own expression and the production of proinflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8) in KC. These functions were markedly enhanced with the addition of IL-17A or TNF-α to the cultures. Similarly, IL-36α and IL-36β augmented IL-17A-mediated induction of antibacterial peptides. Finally, we show that the increased gene expression of IL-36 correlated with Th17 cytokines in the lesions of psoriatic patients. Our results indicate that the IL-36 cytokines are not only regulated by Th17 cytokines, but that they themselves can regulate the expression and enhance the function of Th17 cytokines. We propose that a feedback loop between the IL-36 and Th17 cytokines is involved in driving cytokine expression in psoriatic tissues.
    Journal of Investigative Dermatology 09/2011; 131(12):2428-37. · 6.19 Impact Factor
  • Gregory F Sonnenberg, Lynette A Fouser, David Artis
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    ABSTRACT: The maintenance of barrier function at exposed surfaces of the mammalian body is essential for limiting exposure to environmental stimuli, preventing systemic dissemination of commensal and pathogenic microbes and retaining normal homeostasis of the entire body. Indeed, dysregulated barrier function is associated with many infectious and inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, influenza, inflammatory bowel disease and human immunodeficiency virus, which collectively afflict millions of people worldwide. Studies have shown that interleukin 22 (IL-22) is expressed at barrier surfaces and that its expression is dysregulated in certain human diseases, which suggests a critical role in the maintenance of normal barrier homeostasis. Consistent with that, studies of mouse model systems have identified a critical role for signaling by IL-22 through its receptor (IL-22R) in the promotion of antimicrobial immunity, inflammation and tissue repair at barrier surfaces. In this review we will discuss how the expression of IL-22 and IL-22R is regulated, the functions of the IL-22-IL-22R pathway in regulating immunity, inflammation and tissue homeostasis, and the therapeutic potential of targeting this pathway in human disease.
    Nature Immunology 05/2011; 12(5):383-90. · 26.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fetal CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells play a critical role in the development of lymphoid tissues. Recent studies identified that LTi cells persist in adults and are related to a heterogeneous population of innate lymphoid cells that have been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, whether LTi cells contribute to protective immunity remains poorly defined. We demonstrate that after infection with Citrobacter rodentium, CD4(+) LTi cells were a dominant source of interleukin-22 (IL-22) early during infection. Infection-induced CD4(+) LTi cell responses were IL-23 dependent, and ablation of IL-23 impaired innate immunity. Further, depletion of CD4(+) LTi cells abrogated infection-induced expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides, resulting in exacerbated host mortality. LTi cells were also found to be essential for host protective immunity in lymphocyte-replete hosts. Collectively these data demonstrate that adult CD4(+) LTi cells are a critical source of IL-22 and identify a previously unrecognized function for CD4(+) LTi cells in promoting innate immunity in the intestine.
    Immunity 01/2011; 34(1):122-34. · 19.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IL-22 is made by a unique set of innate and adaptive immune cells, including the recently identified noncytolytic NK, lymphoid tissue-inducer, Th17, and Th22 cells. The direct effects of IL-22 are restricted to nonhematopoietic cells, its receptor expressed on the surface of only epithelial cells and some fibroblasts in various organs, including parenchymal tissue of the gut, lung, skin, and liver. Despite this cellular restriction on IL-22 activity, we demonstrate that IL-22 induces effects on systemic biochemical, cellular, and physiological parameters. By utilizing adenoviral-mediated delivery of IL-22 and systemic administration of IL-22 protein, we observed that IL-22 modulates factors involved in coagulation, including fibrinogen levels and platelet numbers, and cellular constituents of blood, such as neutrophil and RBC counts. Furthermore, we observed that IL-22 induces thymic atrophy, body weight loss, and renal proximal tubule metabolic activity. These cellular and physiological parameters are indicative of a systemic inflammatory state. We observed that IL-22 induces biochemical changes in the liver including induction of fibrinogen, CXCL1, and serum amyloid A that likely contribute to the reported cellular and physiological effects of IL-22. Based on these findings, we propose that downstream of its expression and impact in local tissue inflammation, circulating IL-22 can further induce changes in systemic physiology that is indicative of an acute-phase response.
    The Journal of Immunology 11/2010; 185(9):5531-8. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IL-22 has both proinflammatory and tissue-protective properties depending on the context in which it is expressed. However, the factors that influence the functional outcomes of IL-22 expression remain poorly defined. We demonstrate that after administration of a high dose of bleomycin that induces acute tissue damage and airway inflammation and is lethal to wild-type (WT) mice, Th17 cell-derived IL-22 and IL-17A are expressed in the lung. Bleomycin-induced disease was ameliorated in Il22-/- mice or after anti-IL-22 monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment of WT mice, indicating a proinflammatory/pathological role for IL-22 in airway inflammation. However, despite increased bleomycin-induced IL-22 production, Il17a-/- mice were protected from airway inflammation, suggesting that IL-17A may regulate the expression and/or proinflammatory properties of IL-22. Consistent with this, IL-17A inhibited IL-22 production by Th17 cells, and exogenous administration of IL-22 could only promote airway inflammation in vivo by acting in synergy with IL-17A. Anti-IL-22 mAb was delivered to Il17a-/- mice and was found to exacerbate bleomycin-induced airway inflammation, indicating that IL-22 is tissue protective in the absence of IL-17A. Finally, in an in vitro culture system, IL-22 administration protected airway epithelial cells from bleomycin-induced apoptosis, and this protection was reversed after coadministration of IL-17A. These data identify that IL-17A can regulate the expression, proinflammatory properties, and tissue-protective functions of IL-22, and indicate that the presence or absence of IL-17A governs the proinflammatory versus tissue-protective properties of IL-22 in a model of airway damage and inflammation.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 06/2010; 207(6):1293-305. · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IL-22 is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family and signals through a heterodimeric receptor composed of the common IL-10R2 subunit and the IL-22R subunit. IL-10 and IL-22 both activate the STAT3 signaling pathway; however, in contrast to IL-10, relatively little is known about IL-22 in the host response to infection. In this study, using IL-22(-/-) mice, neutralizing Abs to IL-22, or both, we show that IL-22 is dispensable for the development of immunity to the opportunistic pathogens Toxoplasma gondii and Mycobacterium avium when administered via the i.p. or i.v. route, respectively. IL-22 also played little to no role in aerosol infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in granuloma formation and hepatic fibrosis following chronic percutaneous infections with the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. A marked pathogenic role for IL-22 was, however, identified in toxoplasmosis when infections were established by the natural oral route. Anti-IL-22 Ab-treated mice developed significantly less intestinal pathology than control Ab-treated mice even though both groups displayed similar parasite burdens. The decreased gut pathology was associated with reduced IL-17A, IL-17F, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma expression. In contrast to the prior observations of IL-22 protective effects in the gut, these distinct findings with oral T. gondii infection demonstrate that IL-22 also has the potential to contribute to pathogenic inflammation in the intestine. The IL-22 pathway has emerged as a possible target for control of inflammation in certain autoimmune diseases. Our findings suggest that few if any infectious complications would be expected with the suppression of IL-22 signaling.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2010; 184(8):4378-90. · 5.52 Impact Factor
  • Gregory F Sonnenberg, Lynette A Fouser, David Artis
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    ABSTRACT: Expression of interleukin (IL)-22, a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, has recently been reported in a number of human diseases, including mucosal-associated infections and inflammatory disorders of the intestine, skin, and joints. Both T cells and an emerging category of innate lymphoid cells are sources of IL-22, while the IL-22 receptor complex is reported to be restricted to cells of nonhematopoietic origin. The ligand-receptor distribution of IL-22-IL-22R permits immune cells to regulate responses of epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and other tissue-resident stromal cells. This pathway appears to be critically important at barrier surfaces where epithelial cells play an active role in the initiation, regulation, and resolution of immune responses. Functional studies in murine model systems indicate that IL-22 has immunoregulatory properties in infection, inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. In these models, the functional consequences of IL-22 expression can be either pathologic or protective, depending on the context in which it is expressed. Therefore, advancing our understanding of the biology of IL-22-IL-22R may yield novel therapeutic targets in multiple human diseases. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the expression, regulation, and function of IL-22 at barrier surfaces, and offer insights into the next frontiers to be studied in this complex cytokine pathway.
    Advances in Immunology 01/2010; 107:1-29. · 7.26 Impact Factor
  • Cytokine 10/2009; 135:S28. · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T-helper 17 (Th17) cells are a new lineage of CD4(+) T cells that are characterized by their production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recent studies show that these cells can also express IL-17F, IL-22, and IL-21. IL-17A and IL-17F can form a heterodimeric cytokine, which mediates biological activities, at least in part, through shared receptors with IL-17A and IL-17F homodimers. The cytokines made by Th17 cells represent three distinct gene families, highlighting the unique biology of these cells. Accumulating data support a role for Th17 cells and these cytokines in inflammatory processes and in animal models of autoimmunity or inflammation. Emerging data in clinical trials support our understanding of the importance of Th17 cells in inflammatory disease. Future clinical studies will allow us to evaluate the role of each cytokine independently in contributing to human diseases with immune-mediated pathologies and to design optimal cytokine-targeted therapies for these diseases.
    Immunological Reviews 01/2009; 226:87-102. · 12.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL) 22 is a type II cytokine that is produced by immune cells and acts on nonimmune cells to regulate local tissue inflammation. As a product of the recently identified T helper 17 lineage of CD4(+) effector lymphocytes, IL-22 plays a critical role in mucosal immunity as well as in dysregulated inflammation observed in autoimmune diseases. We used comprehensive mutagenesis combined with mammalian cell expression, ELISA cell-based, and structural methods to evaluate how IL-22 interacts with its cell surface receptor, IL-22R/IL-10R2, and with secreted IL-22 binding protein. This study identifies those amino acid side chains of IL-22 that are individually important for optimal binding to IL-22R, considerably expands the definition of IL-22 surface required for binding to IL-10R2, and demonstrates how IL-22 binding protein prevents IL-22R from binding to IL-22. The IL-22R and IL-10R2 binding sites are juxtaposed on adjacent IL-22 surfaces contributed mostly by helices A, D, and F and loop AB. Our results also provide a model for how IL-19, IL-20, IL-24, and IL-26 which are other IL-10-like cytokines, interact with their respective cell surface receptors.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 08/2008; 382(5):1168-83. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease resulting from the dysregulated interplay between keratinocytes and infiltrating immune cells. We report on a psoriasis-like disease model, which is induced by the transfer of CD4(+)CD45RB(hi)CD25(-) cells to pathogen-free scid/scid mice. Psoriasis-like lesions had elevated levels of antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA. Also, similar to psoriasis, disease progression in this model was dependent on the p40 common to IL-12 and IL-23. To investigate the role of IL-22, a Th17 cytokine, in disease progression, mice were treated with IL-22-neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization of IL-22 prevented the development of disease, reducing acanthosis (thickening of the skin), inflammatory infiltrates, and expression of Th17 cytokines. Direct administration of IL-22 into the skin of normal mice induced both antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression. Our data suggest that IL-22, which acts on keratinocytes and other nonhematopoietic cells, is required for development of the autoreactive Th17 cell-dependent disease in this model of skin inflammation. We propose that IL-22 antagonism might be a promising therapy for the treatment of human psoriasis.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 03/2008; 118(2):597-607. · 12.81 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
255.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2012
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • • Perelman School of Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pathobiology
      Philadelphia, PA, United States