Ilse J de Wijs

Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc), Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (24)104.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Variants in ABCA4 are responsible for autosomal recessive Stargardt disease and cone-rod dystrophy. Sequence analysis of ABCA4 exons previously revealed one causative variant in each of 45 probands. To identify the ‘missing’ variants in these cases we performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification-based deletion scanning of ABCA4. In addition, we sequenced the promoter region, fragments containing five deep-intronic splice variants and 15 deep-intronic regions containing weak splice sites. Heterozygous deletions spanning ABCA4 exon 5 or exons 20–22 were found in two probands, heterozygous deep-intronic variants were identified in six probands, and a deep-intronic variant was found together with an exon 20–22 deletion in one proband. Based on ophthalmologic findings and characteristics of the identified exonic variants present in trans, the deep intronic variants V1 and V4 were predicted to be relatively mild and severe, respectively. These findings are important for proper genetic counseling and for the development of variant-specific therapies.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Human Mutation 11/2014; · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Despite tremendous knowledge about the genes involved in RP, little is known about the genetic causes of RP in Indonesia. Here, we aim to identify the molecular genetic causes underlying RP in a small cohort of Indonesian patients, using genome-wide homozygosity mapping. DNA samples from affected and healthy individuals from 14 Indonesian families segregating autosomal recessive, X-linked, or isolated RP were collected. Homozygosity mapping was conducted using Illumina 6k or Affymetrix 5.0 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Known autosomal recessive RP (arRP) genes residing in homozygous regions and X-linked RP genes were sequenced for mutations. In ten out of the 14 families, homozygous regions were identified that contained genes known to be involved in the pathogenesis of RP. Sequence analysis of these genes revealed seven novel homozygous mutations in ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A, member 4 (ABCA4), crumbs homolog 1 (CRB1), eyes shut homolog (Drosophila) (EYS), c-mer proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK), nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group E, member 3 (NR2E3) and phosphodiesterase 6A, cGMP-specific, rod, alpha (PDE6A), all segregating in the respective families. No mutations were identified in the X-linked genes retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) and retinitis pigmentosa 2 (X-linked recessive; RP2). Homozygosity mapping is a powerful tool to identify the genetic defects underlying RP in the Indonesian population. Compared to studies involving patients from other populations, the same genes appear to be implicated in the etiology of recessive RP in Indonesia, although all mutations that were discovered are novel and as such may be unique for this population.
    Molecular vision 01/2011; 17:3013-24. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wnt signaling is a crucial component of the cell machinery orchestrating a series of physiological processes such as cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Among the plethora of roles that Wnt signaling plays, its canonical branch regulates eye organogenesis and angiogenesis. Mutations in the genes encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor protein 5 (LRP5) and frizzled 4 (FZD4), acting as coreceptors for Wnt ligands, cause familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). Moreover, mutations in the gene encoding NDP, a ligand for these Wnt receptors, cause Norrie disease and FEVR. Both FEVR and Norrie disease share similar phenotypic characteristics, including abnormal vascularization of the peripheral retina and formation of fibrovascular masses in the eye that can lead to blindness. In this mutation update, we report 21 novel variants for FZD4, LRP5, and NDP, and discuss the putative functional consequences of missense mutations. In addition, we provide a comprehensive overview of all previously published variants in the aforementioned genes and summarize the phenotypic characteristics in mouse models carrying mutations in the orthologous genes. The increasing molecular understanding of Wnt signaling, related to ocular development and blood supply, offers more tools for accurate disease diagnosis that may be important in the development of therapeutic interventions.
    Human Mutation 03/2010; 31(6):656-66. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the ophthalmic characteristics and to identify the molecular cause of FEVR in a cohort of Dutch probands and their family members. Twenty families with familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) comprising 83 affected and nonaffected individuals were studied. Based on the presence of an avascular zone, the clinical diagnosis was made and biometric data of the posterior pole of 57 patients and family members were obtained by the analysis of fundus photographs and compared with the data of 40 controls. The FZD4, LRP5, and NDP genes were screened for mutations in one affected individual per family. The segregation of the gene variants was studied in the corresponding families. Forty of 83 individuals showed an avascular zone, the most evident clinical sign of FEVR, five showed major signs of FEVR, and 38 persons were not clinically affected. Compared with the control subjects the patients with FEVR had a significantly larger disc-to-macula distance and a significantly smaller optic disc. In 8 of 20 families, a FZD4 mutation was identified, in 2 a mutation in the LRP5 gene, and in 2 a mutation in the NDP gene. Three known and five novel mutations were identified. Nonpenetrance was observed in 26% of the mutation carriers. Significant anatomic differences were identified between the eyes of patients with FEVR with an avascular zone, when compared with those of the control subjects. In patients with an avascular zone, the optic disc was smaller and the disc-to-macula distance larger than in the control subjects. In 60% of the probands, mutations were identified in one of the three known FEVR genes.
    Investigative ophthalmology & visual science 04/2009; 50(9):4379-85. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CHARGE syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. Mutations in this gene are found in 60-70% of patients suspected of having CHARGE syndrome. However, if only typical CHARGE patients are taken into account, mutations in the CHD7 gene are found in over 90% of cases. The remaining 10% might be caused by hitherto undetected alterations of the CHD7 gene, including whole exon duplications and deletions that are missed by the currently used diagnostic procedures. Therefore we looked for these kinds of alterations by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in 54 patients suspected of having CHARGE syndrome without a CHD7 mutation. In one patient a partial deletion of the CHD7 gene (exons 13-38) was identified, while in the other patients no abnormalities were found. The frequency of exon deletions in our cohort was 1.9% (1/54) and 5.6% (1/18) in all patients and in typical CHARGE patients, respectively. We conclude that exon copy number alterations of the CHD7 gene are not a major cause of CHARGE and CHARGE-like syndrome.
    European Journal of Medical Genetics 05/2008; 51(5):417-25. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heterozygous mutations in the LMX1B gene cause nail patella syndrome (NPS) that is associated with nail and skeletal malformations, nephropathy, and glaucoma. Previous phenotype studies of Lmx1b null mice revealed dorsal limb and renal anomalies similar to human NPS, which contributed to the identification of heterozygous mutations in this LIM-homeodomain protein LMX1B as the genetic defect responsible for NPS. Despite advanced insight into the role of the Lmx1b transcription factor in a broad range of animal developmental programs, the pathogenic mechanism underlying dominant inheritance of NPS in man remained unclear. Here, we describe for the first time the detection of two entire LMX1B gene deletions and one smaller exonic LMX1B deletion by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in a series of eight unrelated families with classical features of NPS in whom no pathogenic LMX1B mutation was found by sequence analysis. The identification of entire LMX1B deletions strongly confirms that haploinsufficiency is the principal pathogenetic mechanism of NPS and suggests a difference in dosage sensitivity for this gene between mice and man.
    European Journal of HumanGenetics 05/2008; 16(10):1240-4. · 4.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: L1 elements are autonomous retrotransposons that can cause hereditary diseases. We have previously identified a full-length L1 insertion in the CHM (choroideremia) gene of a patient with choroideremia, an X-linked progressive eye disease. Because this L1 element, designated L1(CHM), contains two 3'-transductions, we were able to delineate a retrotransposition path in which a precursor L1 on chromosome 10p15 or 18p11 retrotransposed to chromosome 6p21 and subsequently to the CHM gene on chromosome Xq21. A cell culture retrotransposition assay showed that L1(CHM) is one of the most active L1 elements in the human genome. Most importantly, analysis of genomic DNA from the CHM patient's relatives indicated somatic and germ-line mosaicism for the L1 insertion in his mother. These findings provide evidence that L1 retrotransposition can occur very early in human embryonic development.
    Human Molecular Genetics 08/2007; 16(13):1587-92. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the identification of mutations in the connexin 26 (GJB2) gene as the most common cause of recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss, the pattern of hearing impairment with these mutations remains inconsistent. Recently a deletion encompassing the GJB6 gene was identified and hypothesized to also contribute to hearing loss. We hereby describe the hearing impairment in Dutch patients with biallelic connexin 26 (GJB2) and GJB2+connexin 30 (GJB6) mutations. The audiograms of patients who were screened for GJB2 and GJB6 mutations were analysed retrospectively. Standard statistical testing was done for symmetry and shape, while repeated measurement analysis was used to assess the relation between mutation and severity. Progression was also studied via linear regression analysis. Of 222 hearing-impaired individuals, 35 exhibited sequence variations; of these 19 had audiograms for study. Hearing loss in patients with biallelic "radical" (i.e. deletions, nonsense and splice site) mutations was significantly worse than in the wild type and heterozygotes (SAS proc GENMOD, p=0.013). The presence of at least one missense mutation in compound heterozygotes tends to lead to better hearing thresholds compared to biallelic radical mutations (p=0.08). One patient with the [35delG]+[del(GJB6-D13S1830)] genotype was severely impaired. Non-progressive hearing impairment was demonstrated in five 35delG homozygotes in individual longitudinal analyses. However a patient with the [299A>C]+[416G>A] genotype showed significant threshold progression in the lower frequencies. Findings on asymmetry and shape were inconclusive. Our data support the hypothesis that severity is a function of genotype and its effect on the amino acid sequence. A bigger cohort is required to establish non-progressivity more definitively.
    International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology 03/2005; 69(2):165-74. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the frequencies of CYP21 mutations and to study genotype-phenotype correlation in a large population of Dutch 21-hydroxylase deficient patients. From 198 patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, 370 unrelated alleles were studied. Gene deletion/conversion was present in 118 of the 370 alleles (31.9%). The most frequent point mutations were I2G (28.1%) and I172N (12.4%). Clustering of pseudogene-derived mutations in exons 7 and 8 (V281L-F306 + 1nt-Q318X-R356W) on a single allele was found in seven unrelated alleles (1.9%). This cluster had been reported before in two other Dutch patients and in two patients in a study from New York, but not in other series worldwide. Six novel mutations were found: 995-996insA, 1123delC, G291R, S301Y, Y376X, and R483Q. Genotype-phenotype correlation (in 87 well documented patients) showed that 28 of 29 (97%) patients with two null mutations and 23 of 24 (96%) patients with mutation I2G (homozygous or heterozygous with a null mutation) had classic salt wasting. Patients with mutation I172N (homozygous or heterozygous with a null or I2G mutation) had salt wasting (2 of 17, 12%), simple virilizing (10 of 17, 59%), or nonclassic CAH (5 of 17, 29%). All six patients with mutation P30L, V281L, or P453S (homozygous or compound heterozygous) had nonclassic CAH. The frequency of CYP21 mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlation in 21-hydroxylase deficient patients in The Netherlands show in general high concordance with previous reports from other Western European countries. However, a cluster of four pseudogene-derived point mutations on exons 7 and 8 on a single allele, observed in almost 2% of the unrelated alleles, seems to be particular for the Dutch population and six novel CYP21 gene mutations were found.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 09/2003; 88(8):3852-9. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Choroideremia (CHM) is a progressive chorioretinal degeneration caused by mutations in the widely expressed CHM gene on chromosome Xq21. The product of this gene, Rab escort protein (REP)-1, is involved in the posttranslational lipid modification and subsequent membrane targeting of Rab proteins, small GTPases that play a key role in intracellular trafficking. We have searched for mutations of the CHM gene in patients with choroideremia by analysis of individual CHM exons and adjacent intronic sequences PCR-amplified from genomic DNA and by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis of the coding region of the CHM mRNA. In 35 patients, at least 21 different causative CHM defects were identified. These included two partial CHM gene deletions and an insertion of a full-length L1 retrotransposon into the coding region of the CHM gene, a type of mutation that has not been previously reported as a cause of CHM. We also detected nine different nonsense mutations, five of which are recurrent, a small deletion, a small insertion, and at least five distinct splice site mutations, one of which has been described previously. Moreover, we report for the first time the identification of an intronic mutation remote from the exon-intron junctions that creates a strong acceptor splice site and leads to the inclusion of a cryptic exon into the CHM mRNA. Finally, in an affected male who did not have a mutation in any of the CHM exons or their splice sites, the deletion of a complete exon from the CHM mRNA was observed.
    Human Genetics 09/2003; 113(3):268-75. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Medical Genetics 06/2003; 40(5):e53. · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • H H Lee, I J de Wijs, E A Sistermans
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a common autosomal recessive disorder mainly caused by defects in the steroid 21-hydroxylase (CYP21) gene. For reliable and accurate mutation detection in the CYP21 gene it is important to separate the CYP21 gene from the highly homologous CYP21P pseudogene. For this, several different strategies have been developed. In the analysis of the common eight nucleotide deletion at codon 110-112, a strategy using the TaqI restriction enzyme was first applied. In one family, the results showed discordance between parents and offspring. The use of microsatellite markers flanking the genuine CYP21 gene did not lead to a correct assignment. The problem was finally resolved by using differential PCR amplification for generating a CYP21-specific template. It was concluded that incomplete TaqI digestion, although not visible on an agarose gel, allowed the amplification of the CYP21P pseudogene, thus leading to a false positive diagnosis. Therefore, we recommend the use of direct gene-specific primers for the essential step in the molecular diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 09/2000; 70(4):322-4. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), an X-linked recessive dysmyelination disorder, is caused by mutations in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene. However, missense mutations were only found in a fraction of PMD patients, even in families that showed linkage with the PLP locus on Xq22. Here we describe the use of an extended protocol that includes screening for both missense mutations and duplications. Two groups of patients were analyzed, one group with 10 independent PMD families and one group with 24 sporadic patients suspected of PMD. Missense mutations in the PLP gene were identified by sequencing. PLP gene duplications were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and/or Southern blot analysis. Sequencing of the PLP gene revealed four mutations in group 1 and one mutation in group 2. However, inclusion of duplication analysis in the screening protocol raised the amount of mutations found in group 1 from 40 to 90%, and in group 2 from 4 to 25%. These results demonstrate that duplications of the PLP gene are the major cause of PMD. Furthermore, it appears that the phenotype resulting from PLP duplications is relatively mild, and that many probands are nontypical PMD patients.
    Neurology 07/1998; 50(6):1749-54. · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied a patient with the diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) for mitochondrial DNA mutations in muscle. Established MELAS mutations were excluded. Mitochondrial DNA was further analyzed for mutations in the 22 tRNA genes by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis; a tRNA(Val) mutation (G1642A) was found. The structure of the altered tRNA, the heteroplasmy, and the absence of the mutation in the mother and in 100 control subjects suggests that the tRNA(Val) mutation is associated with the MELAS syndrome.
    Neurology 02/1998; 50(1):293-5. · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the Neurological Sciences 05/1997; 147(2):215-6. · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Linkage analysis is described in a family with X-linked mental retardation, ataxia, weakness, floppiness, delayed motor development, absence of deep tendon reflexes, hearing impairment and loss of vision (MIM no. 301835). The disease has a fatal course due to the susceptibility of the patients to infections, especially of the respiratory tract. Clinical signs indicate impairment of the posterior columns, peripheral motor and sensory neurons and the second and eighth cranial nerves and/or their nuclei. The involvement of the posterior columns of the spinal cord is further suggested by the almost complete absence of myelinated fibers therein. We localized the responsible gene(s) to Xq21.33-q24 between DXS1231 and DXS1001 with a maximum lod score of 6.97. The proteolipid protein gene, which codes for two myelin proteins of the central nervous system and is located in this region, was considered as a candidate gene for this disorder. However, no mutations were found in the protein-coding part of this gene.
    Human Genetics 12/1996; 98(5):513-7. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Yeast vectors suitable for high-level expression of heterologous proteins should combine a high copy number with high mitotic stability. The pMIRY integrative vector system, based upon targeted integration into the yeast rDNA locus, developed in our laboratory satisfies these criteria. However, insertion of a (foreign) gene drastically reduced its mitotic stability of the resulting vector in comparison to its parent. In this paper we have investigated a number of possible reasons for this reduction in stability. The results demonstrate that plasmid size is an important, but not the only, determinant of mitotic stability. Stable maintenance is only observed when the complete plasmid has a size no larger than that of the rDNA unit (9.1 kb). In addition stability depends upon the nature of the rDNA fragment present in the plasmid, required for targeting its integration. On the other hand, it turned out to be irrelevant for mitotic stability whether the heterologous gene was expressed or not. These findings will be important in the design of a pMIRY vector suitable for industrial production of heterologous proteins.
    Yeast 05/1996; 12(5):467-77. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder that is characterized by dysmyelination of the central nervous system resulting from mutations in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene. Mutations causing either overexpression or expression of a truncated form of PLP result in oligodendrocyte cell death because of accumulation of PLP in the endoplasmic reticulum. It has therefore been hypothesized that absence of the protein should result in a less severe phenotype. However, until now, only one patient has been described with a complete deletion of the PLP gene. We report a Dutch family with a relatively mild form of PMD, in which the disease cosegregates with a (G-to-A) mutation in the initiation codon of the PLP gene. This mutation should cause the total absence of PLP and is therefore in agreement with the hypothesis that absence of PLP leads to a mild form of PMD.
    Human Genetics 04/1996; 97(3):337-9. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microscopically detectable deletions and X;autosome translocations have previously facilitated the construction of a high-resolution interval map of the Xq21 region. Here, we have generated three yeast artificial chromosome contigs spanning approximately 7 megabases of the Xq13.3-q21.31 region. In addition, a novel deletion associated with choroideremia and mental retardation was identified and mapped in detail. The proximal deletion endpoint was positioned between the loci DXS995 and DXS232, which enabled us to confirm the critical region for a locus involved in mental retardation. The distal deletion endpoint is situated in the Xq21.33 band, which allowed us to refine the order of several markers in this region.
    European Journal of HumanGenetics 02/1995; 3(4):207-18. · 4.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a family with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes with extremely varying clinical expression, we have identified the A3243G heteroplasmic point mutation in mitochondrial DNA. The degree of severity of the clinical symptoms in the various family members was reflected in the relative quantity of mutated mitochondrial DNA in different tissues. The biochemical activity of complex I of the respiratory chain in muscle was decreased in some members of this family.
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences 07/1994; 124(1):77-82. · 2.24 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

483 Citations
104.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2014
    • Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc)
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2007–2010
    • Radboud University Nijmegen
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands